Best and Worst Adaptation(s) of Book(s) To Cinema and Television

Ruby

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Blood & Chocolate -one of my favourite books about a teenage werewolf -totally and criminally butchered by the movie.
 

Nerds_feather

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I'm enjoying the TV adaptation of The Expanse. I was lukewarm on Leviathan Wakes, but think the show solves a lot of the issues I had with the book. I have heard that the later books are really good, but I haven't read them, so I can't judge in comparison to the show. I'll probably read them after finishing S2 of the series, though.
 

BAYLOR

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I'm enjoying the TV adaptation of The Expanse. I was lukewarm on Leviathan Wakes, but think the show solves a lot of the issues I had with the book. I have heard that the later books are really good, but I haven't read them, so I can't judge in comparison to the show. I'll probably read them after finishing S2 of the series, though.
Its a great tv show.:)
 

Evan Purl

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Blade Runner drops many of the characters, plot developments and themes of Dick's book.
I would have to agree with you. Every time a movie comes out which is based off a book, I tend to read the book first to make sure I enjoy it before watching the movie. Blade Runner did in fact drop many of the characters and themes that made the book feel more complete. The movie was still fun to watch, but it would have been nice if we had more of the book in the movie.
 

Evan Purl

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My overall favorite movie adaptation of a book to a movie would definitely have to be The Martian. When I read the book I really did feel like I was pulled into Mark Watney's world. I enjoyed the book to the point I read it a second time before seeing the movie just to make sure I had all of the details. When I saw the movie, I was astonished by how much of the book they kept in the movie. Most adaptations they use some details from the book, but the director changes it. In The Martian they kept almost every detail between the book and the movie. I recommend reading it to anybody who is interested in a good book to read.
 

Bick

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Ive never had a burning desire to red that book.
It seems to split opinion but I really liked it. I think it’s whats known as a marmite book, and McCarthy is himself a marmite author.

(For correlational purposes it might be interesting to hear McCarthy’s thoughts on marmite itself.)
 

BAYLOR

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It seems to split opinion but I really liked it. I think it’s whats known as a marmite book, and McCarthy is himself a marmite author.

(For correlational purposes it might be interesting to hear McCarthy’s thoughts on marmite itself.)
My favoite end of cilcization novel is Earth Abides by George R Stewart. I would love to see this one adapted.
 

BAYLOR

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Never read it (and feel slightly shameful saying it). Should I?
It took me years to get around to reading it. It's beautifully written, vibrant and powerful ,disturbing in places and poignant and sad. George R Stewart wrote a number of other books but Earth Abides is his only Science Fiction novel . Its a book im glad I read. :)
 

Robert Zwilling

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I never heard of the story but from what I can see it was certainly famous when it came out in 1949. In 1951 it got the fiction component (one fiction, one non fiction) of the International Fantasy Award (1951 to 1957), interesting people on that list. Earth Abides is not in the library as such, I will have to request it. Sneaker Net will retrieve it, that's when people walk from there to here to deliver the product to a waiting courier. Kind of like old times. When I looked up the name, I didn't recognize it but I did recognize one of his titles, Pickett's Charge. I read history from time to time, that was one of my earlier ones.

Amidst all the euphoria of after the war and approaching the next 50 years of progress, it seems like some people weren't too sure of where we were going. The Earth keeps going though maybe not with all the people you started out with. It sounds like a sad book. Having read Pickett's Charge, I am familiar with a piece of his historical writing, an extremely well detailed accounting of scores of
people dying on purpose and by accident over a time span of 15 hours. I have been reading Prey out of order. Its like turning over rocks to see what is under them. It's a mechanical plague, nothing to worry about. Sometimes a surprise sometimes not.

Stories that have a big calamity, such as a death dealing plague, that's done to set the stage so humanity can then slide backwards. Some people see humanity going forward and backwards at the same time. I looked at an overview of Earth Abides, it said as the story progressed more people became superstitious, like it used to be when people had a god for everything. Should I say when we had a god for everything, as part of a collective consciousness that never really leaves us.

As the world becomes more technologically advanced and the technology is spread to everyone, the percentage of the population that understands how the technology really works is declining. You get the phone, you push the virtual button and it works. You have absolutely no idea what pushing the dimensionless button even does, what circuits are activated, what internal apps the phone puts into play. We have been told for a long time we don't need to know how it works to use it, just use it. I would call our understanding of how it works akin to superstition. Looking at it that way, superstition is not only alive but growing stronger everyday. No calamity was needed to bring back superstition, only the willingness of everyone to use something, maybe even believe in it, without having the faintest idea of how it works.
 

Cathbad

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Murder on the Orient Express (1974)

I've just watched this wonderful film again.

I'm sure everyone here knows the Agatha Christie story, so I'll only say this: Do you really want to know what's missing from more recent films? If you haven't yet seen this film, I urge you to do so now (it's available for free on Amazon Prime).

Discover what real acting is like, devoid of Special Effects and CGI. And know what you've been missing.
 

Cathbad

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Murder on the Orient Express (1974)

I've just watched this wonderful film again.

I'm sure everyone here knows the Agatha Christie story, so I'll only say this: Do you really want to know what's missing from more recent films? If you haven't yet seen this film, I urge you to do so now (it's available for free on Amazon Prime).

Discover what real acting is like, devoid of Special Effects and CGI. And know what you've been missing.
Wrong dam thread!!
 

BAYLOR

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Murder on the Orient Express (1974)

I've just watched this wonderful film again.

I'm sure everyone here knows the Agatha Christie story, so I'll only say this: Do you really want to know what's missing from more recent films? If you haven't yet seen this film, I urge you to do so now (it's available for free on Amazon Prime).

Discover what real acting is like, devoid of Special Effects and CGI. And know what you've been missing.
Ive seen that version. Its a terrific film .(y):cool:
 

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