• Published a book you want to tell us about? Uploaded a YouTube video you want to share?

    Normally you'll need 100 posts to self-promote, but with an upgraded membership you can do so with your first post.

    Find out more here: Become a Supporting Member

Book Hauls!

Extollager

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 21, 2010
Messages
6,080
Yeah -- I don't think I will keep all of these (already have a copy of City, for one thing), but that Norton looks like a keeper.
 

Victoria Silverwolf

Vegetarian Werewolf
Joined
Dec 9, 2012
Messages
5,772
Location
Chattanooga, Tennessee, USA
Picked up a couple of volumes by Patricia Highsmith at a used book store.

The Blunderer (1954) -- Psychological suspense novel.

Tales of Natural and Unnatural Catastrophes (1987) -- Collection of what seem to be darkly satiric fables.

Should be an interesting look at the very early and very late stages of her career.
 

Randy M.

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2012
Messages
1,337
Victoria, FYI, Sarah Weinman, who appears to be leading the charge to bring back the works of 20th century women crime writers, included The Blunderer in her Library of America collection, Women Crime Writers: Four Suspense Novels of the 1950s.

I'm a little surprised Highsmith hasn't been given her own volume of collected novels/short stories, but who knows, it may yet happen.

Randy M.
 

Victoria Silverwolf

Vegetarian Werewolf
Joined
Dec 9, 2012
Messages
5,772
Location
Chattanooga, Tennessee, USA
Victoria, FYI, Sarah Weinman, who appears to be leading the charge to bring back the works of 20th century women crime writers, included The Blunderer in her Library of America collection, Women Crime Writers: Four Suspense Novels of the 1950s.

That collection looks like a fine one. (There's also a companion volume for the 1940s.)

Her classic novel The Talented Mr. Ripley is included in the Library of America's Crime Novels: American Noir of the 1950s. I've read that collection, as well as the companion volume for the 1930s and 1940s.
 

dask

dark and stormy knight
Joined
Nov 1, 2008
Messages
3,395
Location
Pacific Northwest
Found these on the last day of the library book sale:
Image (264).jpg
Image (265).jpg

Fifty cents each. The Michener looks unread. The cover's banged up a little from ignorant handling but the pages don't look like they've ever been thumbed.
 

Anthoney

Bearded Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2018
Messages
599
Location
South Florida
I think I was 11 when I read Podkayne of Mars. Not long after that I read Beyond this Horizon but I don't remember it as well as I do Podkayne.
 

dask

dark and stormy knight
Joined
Nov 1, 2008
Messages
3,395
Location
Pacific Northwest
Remember this?
TheArsenalOutOfTime.jpeg

When Extollager posted this in a recent Book Hauls I knew I had to have it. I know you can't judge a book by its cover but you can use it as a guide to the kind of story you want to read. Few things are greater than when the sense of wonder of a story matches the sense of wonder of a beautifully rendered cover. If this scene exists somewhere in the universe then I want to be the first to go there. Not likely of course, but a vicarious visit will suffice for now. Wish me luck. (And thank goodness for Amazon.)
 

Rodders

|-O-| (-O-) |-O-|
Supporter
Joined
Nov 6, 2008
Messages
4,027
Shadow Captain by Alistair Reynolds.

I adore the Revelation Space books and I'm hoping that this series harks back to that.
 

dask

dark and stormy knight
Joined
Nov 1, 2008
Messages
3,395
Location
Pacific Northwest
Finally landed a copy. Arrived today:
Image (267).jpg

I've had Seekers Of Tomorrow for decades but this has been most elusive. Until now. It's hauls like this that proves the digital age has promise.
 

Extollager

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 21, 2010
Messages
6,080
Received the two-volume edition of Prescott's Conquest of Mexico (1843), a book I've been interested in for some time. Rider Haggard acknowledged its importance for one of his best romances, Montezuma's Daughter, & Leo Tolstoy said it made a great impression on him.
mex 1.JPG
 

Extollager

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 21, 2010
Messages
6,080
This 1922 Chatto & Windus edition is copiously illustrated by the artist who illustrated E. R. Eddison's The Worm Ouroboros (a book I mean to reread this year...).

mex 2.JPG
 
Top