Has Television Become Bigger and More Important than Cinema ?

BAYLOR

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There is no question that the pandemic has put the damper on the movie theaters but , in the scheme of things , has television become bigger and more important than cinema? What we are seeing is that even Hollywood A list actors have started in a big way ,to lend their talents to the small screen. Them doing television projects has not become not only respectable but even desirable. In fact one ague that it gives them an even better means of showcasing their acting talents .Even A List Hollywood producers ,directors and writer and getting into the act.

How do you. think this bodes for the future of Television and Cinema?
 

Vince W

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Television has been a thorn in the side of cinema for a long time. The pandemic has exacerbated this greatly as we can't go to the cinema safely at the moment. I think the cinema will have to adapt to survive, but while there is a vast amount of television programming available, much of it is pure drek.

I find shows and films by streaming services such as Netflix, Amazon and Apple are bereft of any real value. They are lacking in well edited scripts and film editing. These services seem to think that they should put every inch of film shot onto the screen. They couldn't be more wrong.

I have yet to subscribe to Apple+ but what I've seen of their free episodes I'm not missing much. I know people are raving about the Mandalorian on Disney+ but I'm suspicious of that. I wonder if they are liking because they feel they must like it.

I can count on one hand the number of Netflix originals I've finished.

Television is certainly on top at the moment, but they could learn a lot from the film producers of cinema.
 

TomMazanec

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I cut the cable a few years ago.
But I love Amazon Prime Video!
Haven't gone to the cinema in almost a year.
 

Foxbat

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I think there will be a lot of consolidation both in cinema and TV in the next few years. It’s happening now but it will go much further. Some streamers will gobble up other streamers but keep the brand names associated. The same will happen to film studios. Punters will keep on paying their cash for their favourite streamer or studio, blissfully unaware that their choices are much more limited than they think.
 

Droflet

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I foresee a day when cable networks will drive cinemas out of business. Since HBO burst on the scene cable networks have drawn big stars to their side. Superior scripts are what actors crave. Studios continue to pump out the same old same old then wonder why movie attendance is down. I am, of course, talking about pre covid conditions. If cable keeps going the way it is, and studios keep doing what they do, I don't see cinemas lasting for long. Just my two bobs worth.
 

Judderman

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I think cinemas will keep going strong for another couple of decades, presuming can get full capacity allowed. But you consider how many hours of television are watched a day, and it has always been more important in a way. Since mass market tv ownership. Obviously cinema needs to keep ahead of tvs on tech standards.

I was sad to see a local cinema close down in Calgary. One of those old ones that mainly show either arty/international or old movies. Only so long places can run at low capacity without a big bank account behind them.
 

paeng

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The movie industry has been facing internal problems because too many movies are made every year, with major studios relying on tent-poles that are becoming more risky. That's also why more movies are being released straight to video, including for TV and streaming.

Meanwhile, there are also too many TV movies made, with some of them operating like tent-poles, e.g., millions of dollars per episode, with one season costing almost as much as a Hollywood movie.

Even streaming services are competing with each other, such that in order to watch one favorite show or movie shown exclusively in that platform, viewers tend to subscribe to watch them, then unsubscribe. Or else they wait for the shows to show up on regular TV or even in bargain bins.
 

Robert Zwilling

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Movie actors had to migrate to TV several times over the past 60 years ago, so its not a new deal.

In the last 10 years I have gone to maybe 5 movies at a theater, with more years between each time.

The cable channels started making their own in house programs quite a while ago. Most were not noteworthy for me. One of the first ones I remember was Showtimes Sherman Oaks, a comedy. Big digital companies like Amazon have recreated the Hollywood movie studio atmosphere. The productions range like the Hollywood studios did in their hey day, from A list, to B, C, D, And F, for time fillers, paying actors to practice acting.

I have Acorn and Amazon and an outdoor antenna. On Amazon I watch The Expanse and Bosch, that's it for their home grown continuing series, watch old stuff as I think of it. Have watched some of their shows that only were made for one season. For the antenna, the public broadcasting channels have new stuff, the bulk of the rest of the outdoor antenna is 10 years or older. Its hard for me to think of the small screen as small every time I see someone lugging a 5 foot tall TV out of Walmart. 2 feet tall is the biggest I got, 1 from a yard sale, the other, an old picture tube model.

Dvds, no Blu Rays.

I noticed that the same way book trilogies are marketed, Amazon has started running the first season free for some programs with multiple seasons, then you have to pay one way or another to see the rest of the seasons. I don't pay, I just find another one to watch for free.

I use a Roku box. I sold the Apple TV on eBay.

Digital entertainment is advancing on multiple fronts, but the next big thing, like maybe virtual reality home theater movies is still a ways off, so it seems like the only draw for now are the ever increasing screen sizes.
 

CupofJoe

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Something has been the "death of cinema" since about 1927. It still seems to find a way to carry on.
 

REBerg

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Those with the means can nearly duplicate the cinema experience in a dedicated home theater. The missing element that has kept theaters in business despite the technological challenges it has faced is the communal experience of reacting to a film in a large audience.
(That, and the enormous cost of popcorn. :))
 

Judderman

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Sometimes watching movies at home I find the music is loud and clear but the speech is too quiet like a whisper.
Cinemas have an advantage that you can hear the whispering bit and then get deafened during the loud bits.
 

Parson

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Sometimes watching movies at home I find the music is loud and clear but the speech is too quiet like a whisper.
Cinemas have an advantage that you can hear the whispering bit and then get deafened during the loud bits.

Perfectly true. I find myself wincing at the volume in theaters and have the remote in my hand for parts of Amazon Prime. I'm currently watching "The Amazing Mrs. Maisel." and occaisionally can't hear the quiet parts at all. --- Pretty good series though, But way too many F bombs for me.
 

Judderman

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I find Mrs Maisel is great and funny, except for the comedy routines. Bizarrely the least funny part.
 
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Parson

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Isn't that the truth! A lot of the comedy bits are barely smile worthy, while her life is hilarious. --- I wonder if that's what the message of the show really is?
 

TomMazanec

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Why did 3D cinema fizzle? I liked it, even with the glasses.
Same with TV (though I never had that...too expensive).
 

BAYLOR

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Why did 3D cinema fizzle? I liked it, even with the glasses.
Same with TV (though I never had that...too expensive).

It just didn't catch on, too gimmicky for most consumers.
 

BAYLOR

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It wasn't good enough to warrant the extra price of admission to me.

I found 3D to be aggravating. t\The movies looked dark and subdued and that drove me nuts.
 

farntfar

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The thing with 3D is that there are generally 1 or 2 short scenes where the effect is magnificent (Usually something zooms out of the screen straight at you) and that's it.
Mind you, I wasn't really that bowled over by the arrival of colour tv, apart from the odd "for those of you watching in black and white the green's behind the pink" moments or a bit of Animal Magic or something. So maybe I'm just an old grump.
And I was fairly young the time.
 

TomMazanec

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Does 4K or 8K UHD make any difference vis-a-vis HDTV? I mean, if you don't press your nose to the screen?
 

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