Question about the ending of the rigante series :Stormrider *spoiler*

theseus21

New Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2004
Messages
1
Heya. Could someone explain to me how Mulgrave managed to kill Gaise with the rifle, when he was impervious to "shot and shell and sword" according to the Seidh ? It was a pretty good book overall, but i did skim a few bits and i guess I missed a detail or something. Or maybe I'm just daft. Thanks.
 

Nicado

New Member
Joined
Sep 28, 2003
Messages
4
Good question...I've just finished that book and completely overlooked that. Maybe there he used the infamous golden shot of Tayb's?


Nic
 

Seth God Of Chaos

A God In My Own World
Joined
Sep 7, 2004
Messages
146
Location
Behind you with a knife
In the legend cenarius was killed and beheaded by a golden sword so when mulgrave shot gaise with taybard jaekels golden musket ball it had the same effect as a real bullet
 

clareabella

Lead guitar
Joined
Jan 16, 2003
Messages
39
Location
Enfield, North London
Seth God Of Chaos said:
In the legend cenarius was killed and beheaded by a golden sword so when mulgrave shot gaise with taybard jaekels golden musket ball it had the same effect as a real bullet
I was just about to say that....

I was ok with the ending...could have been better somehow, more of Kaylin (sp?) I think. I did like it how you got to know the Moidart a little more, although still not enough.

But still...I cried like a girl at the end anyhow!
 

Lacedaemonian

A Plume of Smoke
Joined
May 10, 2004
Messages
2,960
Location
The Road
***SPOILER****

Gemmell knows how open up the tear ducts. The death of Jaim Grymauch in Ravenheart still brings a lump to my throat.

Apparently Gemmell's next series will be a historical fantasy based around the events of Troy.
 

potato junkie

Member
Joined
Aug 10, 2005
Messages
5
hey guys. this is my first post.im a big gemmel fan, ive read most of the drenai and all 4 rigante books but after finishing stormrider it was the first time i actually felt i had to come online and find out just what the ending means. the epilogue with feargol in this new continent, what that all about? normally when i finish a gemmel book im full of adrenaline and im in such a good mood cause the ending are normally so amazin. but this one, to be honest, i was quite disapointed in. not only do i not get what the epilogues about, but it didnt really touch me when gaise died. i just didnt find him a loveable character at all. i thought kaelin was way better than him but theres barely any mention of him at the end. anyway, if anyone could shed some light on the epilogue for me i'd be grateful
 

Rahl Windsong

Last of the Windsong Clan
Joined
Mar 15, 2005
Messages
642
Location
Squamish, BC, Canada
Lacedaemonian said:
***SPOILER****

Gemmell knows how open up the tear ducts. The death of Jaim Grymauch in Ravenheart still brings a lump to my throat.

Apparently Gemmell's next series will be a historical fantasy based around the events of Troy.
Aye when Jaim was shot protecting Maev I never even realized but suddenly there was...well tears running down my face. The man knows how to tug at the heartstrings thats for sure!

Rahl
 
Joined
Mar 3, 2006
Messages
15
A very strong end, indeed.

2 potato junkie
Epilogue? A negation of Principle of Lesser Evil, as I uderstand.
 

Winters_Sorrow

Unreg. Mutant Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Feb 1, 2005
Messages
2,956
Location
Newcastle, UK
potato junkie said:
hey guys. this is my first post.im a big gemmel fan, ive read most of the drenai and all 4 rigante books but after finishing stormrider it was the first time i actually felt i had to come online and find out just what the ending means. the epilogue with feargol in this new continent, what that all about?
Hmm - I took it to mean that "magic" was dying out, even in Rigante lands, so Feargol would have 'lost' a lot of his power as it was drawn from the land.

So he went to a "New World" across the ocean with limited technology (which appeared to be one of the factor's 'killing magic') where magic was still powerful and he could do some good and help the "primitive natives"

or, putting it very bluntly, he left Europe and went to North America circa 16th Century.

One of the down sides about Gemmell's Stormrider series is he makes his source material far too obvious, which ruins it a little for me.
Rigante = Scots
Kaelin Ring = William Wallace
Moidart = Robert the Bruce
Jaem = Generic scots "Big Man" with a big heart - how about the ginger dude from Braveheart - he'd fit the bill :)
Varlish = English

You could even draw parallels for Coventers/Royalists being the Roundheads/Royalists from the English civil wars and the Redeemers being the Puritans which held power briefly afterwards.
Of course, that would make Winter Kay, Cromwell which isn't a fair comparison.

I liked his one-offs, like "Echoes of the Great Song", as they have a slice of originality about them, although to be honest, as much as I like David Gemmell's books, he's ripped off History to provide base material from day one.
Sippstrassi (sp?) is probably his "unique" invention, but even that can be traced back to the myth of the Philosopher's Stone.
 

Senta23

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2007
Messages
59
I always wondered that myself, however I was talking to my brother about it the other day and he said it was to do with Mulgrave being like a dad to Gaise. That only someone who oved him could kill him, pretty much like the son killing the dad centuries before.
 

Connavar

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 1, 2007
Messages
8,411
Hmm - I took it to mean that "magic" was dying out, even in Rigante lands, so Feargol would have 'lost' a lot of his power as it was drawn from the land.

So he went to a "New World" across the ocean with limited technology (which appeared to be one of the factor's 'killing magic') where magic was still powerful and he could do some good and help the "primitive natives"

or, putting it very bluntly, he left Europe and went to North America circa 16th Century.

One of the down sides about Gemmell's Stormrider series is he makes his source material far too obvious, which ruins it a little for me.
Rigante = Scots
Kaelin Ring = William Wallace
Moidart = Robert the Bruce
Jaem = Generic scots "Big Man" with a big heart - how about the ginger dude from Braveheart - he'd fit the bill :)
Varlish = English

You could even draw parallels for Coventers/Royalists being the Roundheads/Royalists from the English civil wars and the Redeemers being the Puritans which held power briefly afterwards.
Of course, that would make Winter Kay, Cromwell which isn't a fair comparison.

I liked his one-offs, like "Echoes of the Great Song", as they have a slice of originality about them, although to be honest, as much as I like David Gemmell's books, he's ripped off History to provide base material from day one.
Sippstrassi (sp?) is probably his "unique" invention, but even that can be traced back to the myth of the Philosopher's Stone.
Its also his strenght cause earlier in this series with the stone people source material being so clear, i mean there was even a Gladius. Still you didnt care cause he pulls you into his world and you forget about thier source material.
 

drosdelnoch

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 15, 2006
Messages
131
OK coming into this one a bit on the late side. The only metal that could injure or kill Cernunnos was gold hence why it was used to "slay" his return to the flesh. The son Rigantis, was the one who's own bloodline became the Rigante.

As to whom was who, I would disagree with the Varlish being the English, the Varlish were decended from the Vars who originally were the equivalent of the scandinavians with the Sea Wolves being the Vikings. I suppose you could take a long way round and say for example that the Vars took over what would be normandy and hence the people became the northmen (hence the translation of that area of france. Land of the North Men) who took over and eventually became the rulers of England and then into Scotland. So its possible but albeit from a very diluted way.
 

Connavar28

The sender
Joined
Oct 17, 2007
Messages
17
Mulgrave used taybard jaekels golden musket ball that he won in the shooting comp
 

Connavar

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 1, 2007
Messages
8,411
Well Connavar, its good to see another Connavar :)


I was so awed by Rigante series that i made this nick when i joined these forums. Doesnt the nick look alittle fanboyish :p
 

Connavar28

The sender
Joined
Oct 17, 2007
Messages
17
nothing fanboyish about it youve just got respect a 16 year old boy that takes a f*£$+ing great big bear on with just a dagger :D . at least that the way i feel :p
 

Connavar

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 1, 2007
Messages
8,411
I admired Conn in every page he was in. After Rigante series couldnt help myself.

If i could remake the nick, i would call it simply Connavar. Cooler that way.
 

waltonsmiff

Member
Joined
Jul 9, 2006
Messages
5
I know this is a really late reply, but I just finished Stormrider and I have a few musings.

With regards to places in it, I think Shelding must be chesterfield. This is because it says the church there has a bent spire, just like in the real life chesterfield.

Also, I didn't get it at the end with Feargol in Uzamatte (America). He wanted to stop that native guy from giving the varlish the food, but when the native guy said he was going to give it to them, Feargols 'unease' about the varlish disappears. Why? I thought he was trying to stop them from doing to America what they did to europe.
 
Top