Strange names for characters.

Peppa

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When I read the Of Blood and Bone trilogy by John Gwynne, I often giggled at the beginning, even though these books are officially dark fantasy. The reason was that one of the main characters was called Bleda (like Attila the Hun's brother). His bodyguard was called Ellac (like the eldest son and heir of the aforementioned Attila the Hun). Another character's name was Uldin, and the real Uldin was also a Hun ruler.

I know that the author was honestly trying to show the readers that the imaginary nation to which these characters belonged was very similar to the ancient nomads of the Eurasian steppes, because he did this in other ways too. For example, other characters' names are similar to Mongolian or Turkic names. Bleda's mother is called Erdene, and that is indeed a Mongolian name. They wear deels (a traditional Mongolian garment, like a kimono for the Japanese), are great horsemen and archers, and live in tents.

All in all, it could have been done without the very odd choice of name for one of the main characters, which made me giggle while reading dark fantasy.

Has anyone else giggled while reading a book because the author gave the characters a very strange name?
 
When I saw that name, I realised that naming protagonists after historical figures (or their family members) wasn't such a bad idea.:LOL:
 
I was always quite taken with the full names of Culture citizens, which seemed to act as a kind of biography or address. Jernau Gurgeh's full name is

Chiark-Gevantsa Jernau Morat Gurgeh dam Hassease

I think Chiark was the Orbital, Gevantsa the plate (perhaps), Morat was his designated title as a game player and i think Hassease was his birthplace (again, not too sure).
 
Slartibartfast made me chuckle

Yes and the names Zaphod Beeblebrox, and Poet Grunthos the Flaulent :D who sadly did get to read is 12 volumes epic poem My Favorite Bath Time Gurgles because his major intestine had no appreciation for poetry :(
 
When I read the Of Blood and Bone trilogy by John Gwynne, I often giggled at the beginning, even though these books are officially dark fantasy. The reason was that one of the main characters was called Bleda (like Attila the Hun's brother). His bodyguard was called Ellac (like the eldest son and heir of the aforementioned Attila the Hun). Another character's name was Uldin, and the real Uldin was also a Hun ruler.

I know that the author was honestly trying to show the readers that the imaginary nation to which these characters belonged was very similar to the ancient nomads of the Eurasian steppes, because he did this in other ways too. For example, other characters' names are similar to Mongolian or Turkic names. Bleda's mother is called Erdene, and that is indeed a Mongolian name. They wear deels (a traditional Mongolian garment, like a kimono for the Japanese), are great horsemen and archers, and live in tents.

All in all, it could have been done without the very odd choice of name for one of the main characters, which made me giggle while reading dark fantasy.

Has anyone else giggled while reading a book because the author gave the characters a very strange name?
I totally get it! Sometimes authors use names that unintentionally make us chuckle. I haven't giggled at names in dark fantasy, but I've definitely found some odd character names amusing in other genres.
 
When I read the Of Blood and Bone trilogy by John Gwynne, I often giggled at the beginning, even though these books are officially dark fantasy. The reason was that one of the main characters was called Bleda (like Attila the Hun's brother). His bodyguard was called Ellac (like the eldest son and heir of the aforementioned Attila the Hun). Another character's name was Uldin, and the real Uldin was also a Hun ruler.

I know that the author was honestly trying to show the readers that the imaginary nation to which these characters belonged was very similar to the ancient nomads of the Eurasian steppes, because he did this in other ways too. For example, other characters' names are similar to Mongolian or Turkic names. Bleda's mother is called Erdene, and that is indeed a Mongolian name. They wear deels (a traditional Mongolian garment, like a kimono for the Japanese), are great horsemen and archers, and live in tents.

All in all, it could have been done without the very odd choice of name for one of the main characters, which made me giggle while reading dark fantasy.

Has anyone else giggled while reading a book because the author gave the characters a very strange name?
I don't get it, to be honest - nothing about those names seems amusing or odd to me. I must be missing something.
 
I don't get it, to be honest - nothing about those names seems amusing or odd to me. I must be missing something.
These names struck me as strange and funny, not because they sounded stupid, but because they belonged only to real historical figures. It's as if the characters in a book were called Marie Antoinette or Ramses II.

Some Hunnish names - like Attila, Csaba or Ildiko - are still used in Hungary. But the author used the names of these historical figures that only these people had.

But of course, if you haven't read as much historical research on the Huns as I have, you wouldn't find these names so ridiculous.

By the way, the trilogy itself turned out quite well, despite the names.
 
If you know the context then yeah a bit. I have to consciously ignore "King Aileron" in one epic fantasy with a Celtic feel. Doesn't make me giggle, but do have an "oh what" moment.
I do get irritated when the writer has a character with an unusual name, who is insistent on people pronouncing it right, and that is through the whole book.
 
Not in a book but the Chinese and Japanese students who my wife taught would often adopt "western" names when coming to the UK because they were told their original names would be too hard for people to pronounce. Thus through a series of misunderstandings of Euorpean name conventions you got people called Strawberry and Twist (taken from Oliver Twist the musical).
 
Terry Brooks has some fantastic ones that I don't think were intentional. There's an Elvish politician called "Eton Shart", and a beautiful Rover rebel called "Rue Meridian."
 
If you know the context then yeah a bit. I have to consciously ignore "King Aileron" in one epic fantasy with a Celtic feel. Doesn't make me giggle, but do have an "oh what" moment.
I do get irritated when the writer has a character with an unusual name, who is insistent on people pronouncing it right, and that is through the whole book.
Many years ago, I read some Stargate: Atlantis fanfiction where there was a character called Gotobed. There were many hilarious comments because readers took it to mean "go to bed". In her defence, the author claimed it was an old Celtic name. But I don't know if that's true, as I'm not an expert on ancient Celtic names.
Not in a book but the Chinese and Japanese students who my wife taught would often adopt "western" names when coming to the UK because they were told their original names would be too hard for people to pronounce. Thus through a series of misunderstandings of Euorpean name conventions you got people called Strawberry and Twist (taken from Oliver Twist the musical).
In Mark Twain's books there was a character called Huckleberry Finn. Why is a strawberry worse than a huckleberry? It's even tastier. :lol:
 
Many years ago, I read some Stargate: Atlantis fanfiction where there was a character called Gotobed. There were many hilarious comments because readers took it to mean "go to bed". In her defence, the author claimed it was an old Celtic name. But I don't know if that's true, as I'm not an expert on ancient Celtic names.

In Mark Twain's books there was a character called Huckleberry Finn. Why is a strawberry worse than a huckleberry? It's even tastier. :lol:
Never tasted a Huckleberry so I can't compare.
However I was thinking of Ford Prefect from Hitchhikers
 
@Karapace Having grown them once here in the UK as weren't in shops, they are tomato family, look like a largeish blackcurrant but are not blackcurrant flavoured. Not as sharp as blackcurrants but you definitely want to cook before eating. Sort of fruity with hint of almost musty flavour. Didn't like them raw, weren't that impressed with eating them stewed, jam was nice but whether it was the batch or the fruit it came out reinforced, making huckleberry port was superb.
 
I also drank homemade juice from these berries (sweetened, of course) and had ice cream with toppings made from them. It was passable.
 

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