Early Magazines in Your Collection (Astounding, Galaxy, etc.)

M. Robert Gibson

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#41
covers02.jpg


Here's my contribution, all just sneaking into the time-frame

Science Fantasy 1961
Featuring the first appearance of some bloke called Elric in The Dreaming City by Michael Moorcock
Also
The Veil of Isis by John Rackham
Blood Offering by John Kippax
Valley of the Rainbirds by W. T. Webb
Article: Studies in Science Fiction by Sam Moskowitz

Fantasy and Science Fiction November 1961
Something Strange .. Kingsley Amis
The Cat Lover .. Nicholas Breckenridge
Night Piece .. Poul Anderson
Article: Recipe For A Planet .. Isaac Asimov
Closing Time .. Kris Neville
Undergrowth .. Brian W. Aldiss

Fantasy and Science Fiction August 1962
Gift Of The Gods .. Jay Williams
The Kit-Katt Klub .. John Shepley
To Lift A Ship .. Kit Reed
Article: Isaac Asimov
Moon Fishers .. Charles Henneberg
Shards .. Brian W. Aldiss
Jonathan And The Space Whale .. Robert F. Young

Fantasy and Science Fiction July 1963
Seven Days' Wonder .. Edward Wellen
The Day After Saturation .. D. K. Findlay
The Question .. Larry M. Harris & Donald E. Westlake
The Importance of Being Important .. Calvin W. Demmon
The Journey of Ten Thousand Miles .. Will Mohler
Article: You, Too, Can Speak Gaelic .. Isaac Asimov
Captain Honario Harpplayer, R.N. .. Harry Harrison
Game for Motel Room .. Fritz Leiber
Hunter, Come Home .. Richard McKenna


Apart from Moorcock's Elric, I don't know if any of the other stories are significant, so maybe someone can enlighten me...
 

Extollager

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#42
Here are two magazines with 1968 cover dates, Analog (Feb.) and Galaxy (June). I bought a copy of that Analog back then because of the Star Trek article by G. Harry Stine -- whose name appears in the spread on sf people and the Vietnam involvement in the Galaxy issue.
68 mags.JPG
vn yes.JPG
vn no.JPG
 
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Bick

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#43
Thanks for posting Robert; some nice issues there.

Science Fantasy 1961
Featuring the first appearance of some bloke called Elric in The Dreaming City by Michael Moorcock

That is very cool, and doubtless makes it relatively 'valuable'. (though I tend to look at the 'value' as being more related to how much I would want it, than dollar cost in a free market, which interests me rather less :) )

Something Strange .. Kingsley Amis
Night Piece .. Poul Anderson
Undergrowth .. Brian W. Aldiss
Shards .. Brian W. Aldiss
Captain Honario Harpplayer, R.N. .. Harry Harrison
Game for Motel Room .. Fritz Leiber
These stand out as stories by big names - the Amis and the early Aldiss's attract me especially. Not sure any of them are famous stories exactly, but others may correct me.
 

Bick

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#44
...in the spread on sf people and the Vietnam involvement in the Galaxy issue.
No surprises Heinlein was pro US involvement in the war and Asimov was against :)
In fact most of my favoured authors listed here are in the 'against' column, which is mildly interesting.
 

Bick

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#45
I've dug up another from my own collection. This is a British SF magazine from the 1950's. Britain had a fair few magazines toward the latter part of the 'Golden Age', and published big names, particularly by British authors. This is the July 1954 issue of Science Fantasy:

scan0004.jpg


And the reason its not just a random fairly old magazine is that it includes Criminal Record, the first ever SF publication by Brian Aldiss. It also contains a Bertram Chandler and an E. C. Tubb, but its the Aldiss story that makes it special for me.

scan aldiss.jpg
 

hitmouse

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#46
I think Science Fantasy was edited, at least for some of its life, by Kyril Bonfiglioli, who wrote the remarkable Mortdecai trilogy. I am curious to get a flavour of his editorship.
 

Bick

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#47
It was hitmouse, but only in the last 2 years, 1964-66. It was edited by John Carnell (who edited the New Writings in SF series also) from 1950-64.
 

Victoria Silverwolf

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#48
No surprises Heinlein was pro US involvement in the war and Asimov was against :)
In fact most of my favoured authors listed here are in the 'against' column, which is mildly interesting.
The two lists are fascinating. There are authors I like on both sides, as well as lots of names with which I am not familiar. Since I became a rabid reader of science fiction and fantasy at the dawn of the New Wave, I have more favorites on the anti side than the pro side. This is not to say anything against Anderson, Clement, Heinlein, Lafferty, or Niven as writers, to name a few.

(I am slightly surprised to see Lafferty's name on the pro side, as I think of him as an experimentalist, if not quite New Wave, and Silverberg's name on the anti side, as what little I know about his politics suggests that he is moderately conservative.)
 

Bick

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#49
The two lists are fascinating.
I am slightly surprised to see ... Silverberg's name on the anti side, as what little I know about his politics suggests that he is moderately conservative.
That's interesting - I always got the impression from his work that he's quite liberal. But perhaps that comes from knowing he wrote a lot of 'anything goes' kinda pulp, including soft porn!
 

Bick

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#51
Now that’s a collectable magazine! Great stuff, dask. Air Wonder Stories only ran from July 1929 through May 1930.

ISFDB tells me your April 1930 features a good deal of Frank R. Paul artwork (terrific cover!) and an Edmund Hamilton short story.

This magazine started up immediately after Gernsback left Amazing. Basically, Amazing went bankrupt under Gernsback at the start of 1929, was sold by the receiver and Gernsback was forced out as a Director. However he immediately went on to set up Air Wonder Stories, Science Wonder Stories, and Science Wonder Quarterly.

Air Wonder Stories and Science Wonder Stories merged in June 1930 to form the more famous Wonder Stories. In 1936 Gernsback sold Wonder Stories and it was retitled Thrilling Wonder Stories.
 

2DaveWixon

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#52
1a Red Sun 2.jpg


Above is a poor reproduction of the cover of WONDER STORIES (later to become "Thrilling Wonder Stories"), v. 3, no. 7, of December, 1931.
I show it here with some trepidation, since this thread is about Magazines from "Your" Collection -- but while this issue lives with me, it is not mine; it belongs to the Estate of Clifford D. Simak. It was Cliff's, and I hold it in my position as representative of his estate.
(Somehow, I don't think anyone will hold this deviation against me...)

The issue is in poor shape, but there's no cure for that.
And the reason Bick and I brought this up, last month, lies in the fact that (as mentioned in the bottom right corner of the cover), this magazine was Cliff Simak's first appearance in science fiction. (It was not his first story sold, but it was his first story to see print...it's a convoluted story, sorry.)
 

Bick

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#53
That’s a cracker Dave - and is indeed the magazine I was referring to, for that very reason. To have access to (or to store) CDS’s personal stuff is very cool :) .

I think you can be forgiven for posting this one!
 

BAYLOR

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#54
View attachment 49918

Above is a poor reproduction of the cover of WONDER STORIES (later to become "Thrilling Wonder Stories"), v. 3, no. 7, of December, 1931.
I show it here with some trepidation, since this thread is about Magazines from "Your" Collection -- but while this issue lives with me, it is not mine; it belongs to the Estate of Clifford D. Simak. It was Cliff's, and I hold it in my position as representative of his estate.
(Somehow, I don't think anyone will hold this deviation against me...)

The issue is in poor shape, but there's no cure for that.
And the reason Bick and I brought this up, last month, lies in the fact that (as mentioned in the bottom right corner of the cover), this magazine was Cliff Simak's first appearance in science fiction. (It was not his first story sold, but it was his first story to see print...it's a convoluted story, sorry.)
Wonderful cover Dave ! :cool:(y)

By the way who is is Arthur Barnes ?:confused:
 

2DaveWixon

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#57
Wonderful cover Dave ! :cool:(y)

By the way who is is Arthur Barnes ?:confused:
Arthur Kelvin Barnes, 1911-69. He was born in Washington State but spent most of his life in L.A. He wrote in many genres, but -- nice coincidence -- his story "Lord of the Lightning," which appeared in that same issue of WONDER STORIES that Cliff Simak's first published story appeared in (the cover of which is shown above) was also Barnes' first sf story.
I don't think Barnes wrote a lot of sf, and that book you showed -- INTERPLANETARY HUNTER -- seems to have been the work he was best known for. (It is, in fact, a compilation or novelization of five short stories he wrote in the thirties.)

You will note that having been born in 1911, and that first sf story published in 1931 -- it's likely he wrote it as a teen-ager.
I recognize that cover; I'm pretty sure I brought that book. But I don't remember a thing about it, and I don't know which box it's in...
 

2DaveWixon

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#58
That’s a cracker Dave - and is indeed the magazine I was referring to, for that very reason. To have access to (or to store) CDS’s personal stuff is very cool :) .

I think you can be forgiven for posting this one!
The magazine does not identify who did the artwork (which includes line-drawing portraits of each of the authors) for that issue -- but it does identify Frank R. Paul as the Art Director (and my hunch would be that Paul did that cover -- which, by the way, is an illo from the Ed Hamilton story in that issue).
Size: the magazine is larger, but thin -- maybe about the size of those "bedsheet" format magazines that sf experimented with now and then...
I wonder what it must have been like for Cliff Simak (and Barnes, too, for that matter): seeing his first published fiction, not only in print, but with an illustration of himself to go with it -- and all that arranged by the legendary Hugo Gernsback.

(An aside: the also-legendary sf bookstore in Minneapolis, Uncle Hugo's, founded by one of my law school classmates, and which I worked in for a while, was named for Gernsback.)
 

BAYLOR

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#59

BAYLOR

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#60
The various magazines that have catered to science fiction and fantasy readers is one area of which I know so little about. I know bits and pieces of things ive picked up over the years. Writers ive never even heard of heard of and so many of those. :unsure:
 
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