And Seven Times Never Kill Man

Joined
Nov 2, 2018
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17
#1
Hey, I know most of the discussion here is on ASOIAF but it is a GRRM board so I figured this was the place to put this:

I just finished And Seven Times Never Kill Man, a 1974 SF short story about expansionist humans and religious wars against a local alien society and their tribal religion. It kind of blew my mind-- although I did get the sense in reading it that I would have a better idea of what had gone on if I'd read more of the Thousand Worlds setting (I'm reading through a collection that includes Night-flyers and a handful of other stories, so I've read some, but not nearly enough of George's SF).

That being said: Has anyone else read this story? The ending particularly threw me hard (but I'd hate to spoil for someone who hasn't read). Any thoughts on it, or on George's earlier stuff generally? Any recommendations for other stuff in Thousands Worlds?
 

Koopa

Old KiwiBird
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Jun 17, 2006
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1,863
#2
Haven't read much beyond stuff related to asoiaf.

i read a book about people who can attach mechanized wings, it was okay'ish. Looked up the name, it is called Windhaven. Collaboration with Lisa Tuttle.
 

Boaz

Thaphireth!
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Jul 14, 2005
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#3
Welcome to the Chrons, Jondo! Yes, this forum is heavy on ASOIAF, but it is for all of GRRM's works.

Nightflyers was alright... sci-fi and horror are not my favorite genres. Sandkings was interesting. A Song for Lya was also interesting.

Windhaven fell far short of my expectations.

I thought Hunter's Run was very good. If I recall correctly, Gardener Dozois started it, gave it to Martin who worked on it, and who then passed it on to Daniel Abraham who finished it. The themes of humanity, orginality, morality, change... i.e. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn updated... are all poked and prodded by the authors.

For me, it's the moral implications and familial machinations of the fantastic-medieval political intrigue of middle-aged men that intrigues me with ASOIAF.
 
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#4
. A Song for Lya was also interesting.
The collection I read Night-flyers and And Seven Times Never Kill Man ended with A Song for Lya. I agree with your diagnosis as interesting. SF and Horror are definitely my weaker genres as well-- I got into GRRM through ASOIAF, as, I think, did most people.

Honestly I agree with your thoughts on ASOIAF, as well. The dynamics between the families and the way the intrigue is all handled-- especially to the degree that we are still talking about events from the very first book twenty-odd years after it came out-- is just amazing. I wish I could capture narrative complexity of that scale in my own writing.
 

Boaz

Thaphireth!
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Jul 14, 2005
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5,711
#5
After reading ASOIAF, I found GRRM's shorter works lack the depth of his magnum opus.

Duh!

Okay... so I guess I so feel the same regarding Tolkien... the trilogy and the The Silmarillion compared to Farmer Giles, et al.
 
Joined
Nov 2, 2018
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#6
Yeah. I haven't read his Westeros novellas, but I'm thinking of picking them up soon-- only I'm afraid of exactly that, that they won't capture the same spirit the novels handle.

We'll see, though. In the end I'm sure I'll enjoy them.
 

Narkalui

Nerf Herder
Joined
Nov 10, 2007
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#7
The Dunk and Egg stories are very enjoyable, lighter and simpler in tone, perhaps because they are set in a lighter and simpler time.

I like them mostly because I find it interesting to see The Seven Kingdoms during a time of peace under the rule of the Targaryen dynasty...
 

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