Is Terry Goodkind any good?

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Looking to start a new series after The Book of the New Sun, it's either between The Malazan Book of the Fallen by Erikson or The Sword of Truth by Goodkind

So, chrons, what would be the wiser choice

Is there a reason Goodkind doesn't have his own sub forum?
Is he a poor writer?
 

nixie

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Well, I'd opt for Erikson's, Malazan book of the Fallen for me the best series ever.

Goodkind I wouldn't recommend I don't like his preaching. You'll also find that a lot of people have strong feelings were Goodkind is concerned, doesn't seem to be a middle ground either they love or loathe him. The majority do seem to loathe.

As for a sub forum, there hasn't been enough interest in him to warrant one.
 

ratsy

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I have read all of the Sword of Truth and only have read the first Malazan....go with the Erikson series. Just Gardens of the Moon was 10 times better than the Goodkind series.

I only read the Goodkind as a kind of sick compulsive thing I think
 

Heather Myst

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I know I'm in the minority here but I enjoyed The Sword of Truth series way more than the Malazan series. The series does get preachy but it did not take away from my enjoyment of the books and the love story between Richard and Kahlan was awesome. I also loved the Mord-Sith characters.

As far as the Malazan series I think book one Gardens of the Moon was terrible and I did not enjoy how the main characters changed from book to book. I did read the entire series because a good friend bought them for me but it is not a series that I would recommend.

Have you read Martin, Abercrombie, or Michael Sullivan? Nixie is right that most people either love or hate Goodkind. I would suggest that you try a site like Amazon.Com that lets you read a sample of the books so that you can see whose style you enjoy.
 

Gumboot

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I quite enjoyed Goodkind's first book, and the second wasn't bad, but I never even finished the third, and I have it on good authority they rapidly degenerate into quasi-philosophical lectures after that.
 

Warren_Paul

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I liked Goodkind's books at first, but around the middle they started to run a bit off the rails. Although, the chainfire trilogy (last three books) was what I felt his best since the first book though. I don't really see the philosophical preaching more the sterotypical male explicitness of many scenes - borderline erotic, and not in a good way. Forced nudity, rape... bestiality.

I think Erikson is better, but harder to read.
 

Moggle

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Both writers have negatives with their writing and storytelling, but I personally found the sword of truth series very enjoyable. Individually, the books are not particularly strong, but I read them for the characters first and foremost.
 
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I think I am going with Erikson, I've read more about him and as someone who is aspiring to be an anthropological archaeologist I am very interested in seeing what Erikson, who has a background in just that very field, has to offer. Might give Goodkind a chance somewhere down the road, but I think I'll have my hands full for now
 

AndrewT

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I started SoT and Malazan both and did not get too far or lost interest. I may try again later. Two series that I recommend instead are Memory Sorrow Thorn by Tad Williams and Codex Alera by Jim Butcher. I didn't have any trouble sticking with those at all. Simpler and just plain better imo, without any rambling, preaching, and hard to follow storylines.
 

Timba

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Erikson is the only author I have ever started a book on and simply quit. How he became so popular is beyond me.
 

HareBrain

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as someone who is aspiring to be an anthropological archaeologist I am very interested in seeing what Erikson, who has a background in just that very field, has to offer.

I'm no expert in the field, but I do have a bit of an interest in it, and I can't say Erikson's background came across to me much in the three Malazan books I read. I found it much more, for example, in Le Guin's Earthsea series (especially in the second story, The Tombs of Atuan).

I didn't get on with the Malazan books myself, though I can see why many do. But at least I lasted three books, rather than the half-page of Goodkind I tried to read, so of the two I'd definitely go for Erikson.
 

biodroid

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I found the Wizards First Rule to be very good. I read the first 2 Malazan books and thought to myself, why would I carry on with this series? It just doesnt work for me. A multitude of characters to keep track of and a confusing story without much explanation as to why certain things have happened the way they did. I prefer more traditional fantasy anyway.
 

thaddeus6th

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After careful consideration I'd suggest reading something by Joe Abercrombie.

I read Gardens of the Moon but found it rather baffling. I can see why people like Erikson but there was too much tease and not enough show for me.

I started the first Sword of Thingummyjig book by Goodkind, but didn't get too far. I loved the description, but the plot was instantly too convenient and didn't grab me. Also, and this is probably UK-only, having a mystical land called the Midlands did make it somewhat hard to suspend disbelief.
 

Brian G Turner

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I started SoT and Malazan both and did not get too far or lost interest.

Same here - I was never convinced the world of Gardens Of The Moon could plausibly exist - there was so much war and carnage and the intervention of "gods" that I figured it would be impossible for any kind of advanced civilisation to exist. If Erikson has an education in anthropology, it doesn't really show in the books - far more focus on the fantasical than the realistic.

Joe Abercrombie and Scott Lynch are both decent epic fantasy writers worth touching on if not already.

Terry Goodkind - my impression so far is that most authors tend to be politically liberal, as might be expected of artistic people, whereas Goodkind can easily be imagined stood beside Sarah Palin. Still, for all the flak the man heaps on himself, he's finally made my reading list. Will probably be good to read him directly rather than second-hand opinion, though I will be genuinely disappointed if I don't encounter the scene with the evil chicken of doom. :)
 

Warren_Paul

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I found the Wizards First Rule to be very good. I read the first 2 Malazan books and thought to myself, why would I carry on with this series? It just doesnt work for me. A multitude of characters to keep track of and a confusing story without much explanation as to why certain things have happened the way they did. I prefer more traditional fantasy anyway.

Yeah, the number of characters is quite high. To the point that there became too many to satisfactorily wrap up plotlines. Some ended up with pointless cameo appearances at the end.

But it's sad you stopped after Deadhouse Gates, because once past those two it was much smoother sailing. Especially since Memories of Ice came next. The third book was his best book. The main reason being as he had to write it twice because of a HD failure. (That's how we ended up with the sidestory, Deadhouse Gates - Memories of Ice was supposed to be the second book originally).

I wouldn't get too put off by the comments, Stephen. I worry that sometimes we can get too difficult with our expectations to the point that we ruin any possible enjoyment we can get out of stories by critiquing them instead of just enjoying them for what they are. You could do far worse than either of these authors. I think they are both worth reading.

Joe Abercrombie has been mentioned several times in this thread. I give him a +1 as well. One of the best authors out there atm.
 

biodroid

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Warren Paul - I might get back into MOI but I can't really remember the plot of the first 2 so it will take me a while to re-read them. I prefer Joe Abercrombie anyway but still have to finish the first trilogy. I am currently going thru Magician by Feist and then will see if Terry Brooks Sword of Shannara is any good.
 

Warren_Paul

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Warren Paul - I might get back into MOI but I can't really remember the plot of the first 2 so it will take me a while to re-read them. I prefer Joe Abercrombie anyway but still have to finish the first trilogy. I am currently going thru Magician by Feist and then will see if Terry Brooks Sword of Shannara is any good.

Magician was the first fantasy book I ever read. Opened up the whole genre to me. Loved it.

Terry Brooks. Sword of Shannara was terrible, but the next book: Elfstones of Shannara was really good. I think the first trilogy is hit and miss. The second was okay. Voyage of the Jerle Shannara is where he actually started getting consistently good. But the books have a blatant YA Fantasy feel to them.
 

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