History Dates, coincidences, and interesting juxtapositions

Cthulhu.Science

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I just happened upon a Documentary TV series about British history, Magna Carta: Unlocked

Episode 1 discusses the signing of the Magna Carta, 15 June 1215
Episode 5 (final) is about the Battle of Waterloo, 18 June 1815

Nearly exactly 600 years apart.

It doesn't mean anything in any way. I just found it worthy of remark.
 
I'm a fan of these comparative timelines as well.
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I just happened upon a Documentary TV series about British history, Magna Carta: Unlocked

Episode 1 discusses the signing of the Magna Carta, 15 June 1215
Episode 5 (final) is about the Battle of Waterloo, 18 June 1815

Nearly exactly 600 years apart.

It doesn't mean anything in any way. I just found it worthy of remark.
<Pedantic Mode ON/>

Unfortunately you have to take into account the fact that the Gregorian Calendar was adopted by the UK on September 2 1752 (the very next day was September 14) Also note that this alteration was required to correct the total drift that the Julian calendar had caused since its adoption, hence if you went back 600 years just using the Gregorian definition the drift is another different number of days - 4.5 given the average lengths of the years* (Gregorian years are a tiny tad shorter than Julian years)



* Okay, it's more complicated than that, we have 600 years where some are Julian, some are Gregorian....

<Pedantic Mode OFF/> :giggle: ;)
 
Last edited:
<Pedantic Mode ON/>

Unfortunately you have to take into account the fact that the Gregorian Calendar was adopted by the UK on September 2 1752 (the very next day was September 14) Also note that this alteration was required to correct the total drift that the Julian calendar had caused since its adoption, hence if you went back 600 years just using the Gregorian definition the drift is another different number of days - 4.5 given the average lengths of the years* (Gregorian years are a tiny tad shorter than Julian years)



* Okay, it's more complicated than that, we have 600 years where some are Julian, some are Gregorian....

<Pedantic Mode OFF/> :giggle: ;)
Interesting point. That fits in with the question of some famous people's birthdays -- George Washington was known to have personally changed his birthday when the British switched calendars.
 
Interesting point. That fits in with the question of some famous people's birthdays -- George Washington was known to have personally changed his birthday when the British switched calendars.
The most well-known change was for the British government to move the tax year from the traditional 25th March start date to the 5th of April. So rather than take 11 days off that particular tax year and take a small temporary revenue hit, the government lengthened the tax year for 1752/53.

They did this again in 1800 and moved it to the 6th of April, because the Gregorian calendar did not have a leap day that year, compared to the Julian calendar.

Seems a bit pointless to me, but that's tax and governments for ya!

However if you want to see even bigger calendar shenanigans, then look up 'the longest year in human history', namely 46 BCE. It lasted 446 days, was nicknamed 'year of confusion' and was when the Julian calendar was initially implemented. Plenty of videos on YouTube going through that one.
 
The most well-known change was for the British government to move the tax year from the traditional 25th March start date to the 5th of April. So rather than take 11 days off that particular tax year and take a small temporary revenue hit, the government lengthened the tax year for 1752/53.

They did this again in 1800 and moved it to the 6th of April, because the Gregorian calendar did not have a leap day that year, compared to the Julian calendar.

Seems a bit pointless to me, but that's tax and governments for ya!
They probably feared the taxpayers would otherwise rebel. There were already enough angry people who felt that by skipping 11 days* of the calendar their lives were shortened by as much days.

On dates and coincidences - and on a smaller scale - while delving into my genealogical ancestry I found that both my parents and my parental great grandparents married on the exact same date; 18 august (both Gregorian dates, just to be clear ;) .)

* This varies between 10 and 14 days depending on where you lived and when the calendar-change was implemented locally In the Dutch Republic and the (so called) United Provinces there were 6 different dates on which the 7 Provinces went Gregorian, between 1582 and 1701.
 
They probably feared the taxpayers would otherwise rebel. There were already enough angry people who felt that by skipping 11 days* of the calendar their lives were shortened by as much days.
A nice story, but...

...this apparently is an urban myth and there were no riots or angry people.
 

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