What Fantasy Short Stories Would You Make Required Reading ?

BAYLOR

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Well, we have a thread topic on Science Fiction, so, why not a topic on fantasy? However , Im going include fantasy short stories too .:)


Which ones do you think should be required reading in School?:)
 
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nixie

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I'm not a fan of required reading. Never liked it when I was at school, being set a specific numbers of chapters to read before next lesson, I really detested it. Could never stick to it, I'd read the whole book before the next lesson and had moved on to another. When I did force myself to stick to the set amount I lost interest.
 

alexvss

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I'm not a fan of required reading. Never liked it when I was at school, being set a specific numbers of chapters to read before next lesson, I really detested it. Could never stick to it, I'd read the whole book before the next lesson and had moved on to another. When I did force myself to stick to the set amount I lost interest.
Me neither. Turning something into mandatory takes all the magic from it.

But, considering we don't take "required" too literally, The Lord of the Rings would be my first pick.
 

Teresa Edgerton

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Yes we can--you will notice that I didn't lock this thread-- but I expect it won' t go far, as it is rather redundant.

On the other hand, if you want a thread specifically about fantasy short fiction that should be required reading, we could slightly alter the title of this one.
 

Teresa Edgerton

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OK, it's done. I also fixed some typos in the original post, per your request.

The topic is now short fiction (short stories, novelettes, novellas) in the fantasy genre, that we think ought to be read in the schools.

The other thread was limited to books written after a certain date. Since you say nothing about that in your original post, shall we assume that authors like Nathaniel Hawthorne (some of whose stories I would like to recommend) would fit in this thread?
 

BAYLOR

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OK, it's done. I also fixed some typos in the original post, per your request.

The topic is now short fiction (short stories, novelettes, novellas) in the fantasy genre, that we think ought to be read in the schools.

The other thread was limited to books written after a certain date. Since you say nothing about that in your original post, shall we assume that authors like Nathaniel Hawthorne (some of whose stories I would like to recommend) would fit in this thread?

Old classics stories ? Yes , but topicwise this would, no cutoff date. Does that help ? :)
 

Teresa Edgerton

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Then I would nominate Hawthorne's "Feathertop"—for reading in the schools, and perhaps "Young Goodman Brown."

I think his "Rappaccini's Daughter" is an excellent story, as is "The Birthmark," but whether they are fantasy or science fiction may be up for debate. So-called scientists drive the stories, but they really appear to be more like magicians, so they could be either, really.

"The Lost Room," by Fitz-James O-Brien, and any one of a great number of stories by Algernon Blackwood.
 

BAYLOR

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Then I would nominate Hawthorne's "Feathertop"—for reading in the schools, and perhaps "Young Goodman Brown."

I think his "Rappaccini's Daughter" is an excellent story, as is "The Birthmark," but whether they are fantasy or science fiction may be up for debate. So-called scientists drive the stories, but they really appear to be more like magicians, so they could be either, really.

"The Lost Room," by Fitz-James O-Brien, and any one of a great number of stories by Algernon Blackwood.

Ive a number of Hawthorns stores including Young Goodman Brown which I a great story ! that reread a number of time, I would of this other stories but have not read thembut know of them .

Two that I would love to see on the required reading list

The City of The Singing Flame by Clark Ashton Smith in terms prose and story telling , Smith is one the greats and this story one the finest he ever wrote.

The Sombrus Tower By Tanith Lee A young knight on quest to mysterious Tower that will be his doom. Lee was an amazing writer of novels and short stories and this is story by her that I would pick.
 

alexvss

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OK, it's done. I also fixed some typos in the original post, per your request.

The topic is now short fiction (short stories, novelettes, novellas) in the fantasy genre, that we think ought to be read in the schools.

The other thread was limited to books written after a certain date. Since you say nothing about that in your original post, shall we assume that authors like Nathaniel Hawthorne (some of whose stories I would like to recommend) would fit in this thread?
When it comes to short-stories, I'd recommend Conan. My favorites are Xuthal of the Dusk and A Witch Shall be Born.
 

BAYLOR

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When it comes to short-stories, I'd recommend Conan. My favorites are Xuthal of the Dusk and A Witch Shall be Born.

Both terrific reads

Kings of the Night by Robert E Howard , Its a excited tales with an epic battle and his there of Howard's heroes in one story, Bran Mak Morn king of the Picts, King Kull of Valusia , and Cormac Art , the Reiver.
 

paranoid marvin

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Unless things have changed in the intervening period, fantasy (specifically Dahl) had a place in primary school, but none at all in secondary. And absolutely not a chance of science fiction or horror appearing on the curriculum in secondary school.

Sometimes required, or compulsory, reading can have its benefits. We had to read Jane Eyre when I was about 14 years old. What possible interest could a teenage boy, whose sole reading literature consisted of Tintin, Asterix, and science fiction and fantasy novels, have in a story about a 19th century girl?

Well actually quite a lot. In spite of my preconceptions, I was fascinated by the story, and had completed the novel well in advance of the required date.

Then in higher education we studied William Blake and WWI poets. Poetry! Which to that time (based on what we'd been given to read in secondary school) was dull and uninteresting. Yet now that I had read 'Songs of Innocence and of Experience' and been introduced to the caustic wit of Sassoon, I found that poetry could resonate with me.
 

Randy M.

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Then I would nominate Hawthorne's "Feathertop"—for reading in the schools, and perhaps "Young Goodman Brown."

I think his "Rappaccini's Daughter" is an excellent story, as is "The Birthmark," but whether they are fantasy or science fiction may be up for debate. So-called scientists drive the stories, but they really appear to be more like magicians, so they could be either, really.

"The Lost Room," by Fitz-James O-Brien, and any one of a great number of stories by Algernon Blackwood.
I'd add Hawthorne's "The Artist of the Beautiful." And I'd at least consider Blackwood's "The Willows".

Some required reading I hated, like A Separate Peace; some I really enjoyed, like Of Mice and Men. Some of those Hawthorne stories were required reading; “The Tell-Tale Heart” was required, too. So, I have nothing against required reading, as it becomes a shared experience and if the teacher is good, one that requires discussion of why one person likes it and another doesn’t, and why the teacher would assign it in the first place.

Stories I'd have a class read (if anyone was daft enough to let me teach):

"The Homecoming" and/or “The Foghorn” by Ray Bradbury (the latter for its mood; the former because I think it could be tagged as a precursor to everything from "The Goonies" to "Stranger Things.” I recall reading “The Veldt” for class in grade school, so Bradbury isn’t a far reach.)

“The Happy Autumn Fields” by Elizabeth Bowen (beautiful prose in service to a mood piece based on reaction to the then current WWII)

“Ghost Summer” by Tananarive Due (for high school, probably; an example of how to take a serious subject and present it entertainingly and even with humor)

“Linneus Forgets” by Fred Chappel (for high school; a masterclass in merging the historical with fantasy)

Not sure what, but probably something from Sussanah Clarke, Theodora Goss, Angella Slatter and/or Kelly Barnhill, all of whom work around the fairy tale as examples of how fairy tale and folklore inform fiction. Maybe for high school juniors or seniors something from Angela Carter for similar reasons. Or possibly Patricia McKillop’s “The Lady of the Skulls.”

I suspect, if I think awhile, I’ll come up with some others.
 

BAYLOR

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The Lady or the Tiger by Frank Stockton It has a wonderfully ambiguous ending and , he wrote a sequel The Discourager of Hesitancy.:D
 

BAYLOR

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Good choice. When I was in High School that one was assigned reading, one of the few short stories assigned that I actually remember.

It's a pretty good story . I had no idea that Stockton had actually written a sequel to it. :)
 

Randy M.

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Good choice. When I was in High School that one was assigned reading, one of the few short stories assigned that I actually remember.
Me., too, though I think in middle school. We also read "The Most Dangerous Game" by Richard Connell in 4th or 5th grade, and "Johnny Bear" by Steinbeck maybe a year after that, all of which I loved. Then, I recall for one Halloween, we had a teacher's assistant dressed in black, with black curtains over the windows, lights out, and candle lit as she read "The Raven."
 

KGeo777

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I think Gulliver's Travels would be an obvious choice.
Little people? Giants? Talking horses?

The Diamond Lens by Fitz James O'Brien really stuck with me --or is that science fiction? I am amazed that story is not better known. It has such an iconic quality. The juxtaposition of a microscopic universe with obsession--like Edgar Allan Poe crossed with Dr. Seuss.
 

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