AI to take over creative writing

RJM Corbet

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#21
I've bookmarked this thread to follow the comments, but with little to add except that a generation grown to believe that human consciousness and creativity is a mere product of brain activity -- at which AI (ie: dumb machine) can theoretically quite soon learn to do better -- deserves itself, along with the music and the books that it looks to for 'culture'.
 
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Edward M. Grant

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#22
the job of criminal will fall upon the shoulders of the luckless mechanical machines and it will be up to the appliance police to keep the world safe.
I think it was 2000AD comic which had a story many years ago about a planet where there wasn't enough crime to keep the police employed, so they built robots to do the crimes that humans wouldn't do. Except the crime robots were too good at their job, so they then had to build police robots to catch them...

Edit: come to think of it, I remember reading an SF short story along similar lines, but I forget whose it was. So they may have lifted the idea from that.
 
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Vladd67

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#26
I think it was 2000AD comic which had a story many years ago about a planet where there wasn't enough crime to keep the police employed, so they built robots to do the crimes that humans wouldn't do. Except the crime robots were too good at their job, so they then had to build police robots to catch them...

Edit: come to think of it, I remember reading an SF short story along similar lines, but I forget whose it was. So they may have lifted the idea from that.
And then they built more robots to be the victims, I believe in the end the planet exploded.
 

Robert Zwilling

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#28
ONLY A.I. WOULD READ IT.
Funny, but actually quite scary. I sometimes wonder if we can't expose ourselves to enough substances and experiences such that our brains actually get resculptured into resembling another species, never thought about it being an AI machine. There's Decker with the new human AI molded being test book, the latest copy put out by the AI writers, does the subject appreciate the writing or put it down knowing it was written by a machine.

Lady Lovelace offered advice about how to use a computer 180 years ago, it was good advice and it was ignored for a hundred years. She said the machines could compose music, but she also said it wasn't the same kind of creativity. It was using the concepts that were used to create the machine in the first place which limits it's creativity to how we think we think. Thinking and creativity is more than logic gates switching on and off.

What would be interesting to see is a computer system utilizing routines that put profit as an immaterial consequence of actions and instead examined all the damage that could be done and how to avoid it. The philosopher's job was written out of AI a long time ago. They were actually the first to go when machines really began to be equal to people.

Automatic looming machines running on punch cards creating knitted products as a display were the first iteration of computers that started replacing people on a large scale basis. That was probably when philosophy started dying but the philosophers never knew they were embarking on a downward spiral, instead they became dead people walking another 150 years before they became irrelevant.

The ultimate irony is a philosopher with a computer in their office telling them what to do next.
 

Robert Zwilling

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#29
I think you need you know your ending before you start writing ...
Harry Stephen Keeler, who wrote mysteries and science fiction used a process called Webwork that convoluted his stories into roller coaster rides where the guilty character might not appear until the last page, which could have been when he figured out the ending.

I tried webwork to create a story, no where near as convoluted as Keeler but it still had the same effects, building up word count daring readers to keep climbing higher into the clouds before losing track of the story as it drifted higher and higher into the clouds. That could be a good test for the app that creates story endings, give it a real webworked creation and see what it makes of it. Probably prints out a short notice, Please go away.

Using all the rules to write a story maximizes readership but it also limits you to how to far you can push reality, instead it utilizes fantasy to achieve it's goals. Maybe non fiction is like real numbers and fiction is patterned after irrational numbers. I wouldn't be surprised if historical fiction is the glue that holds everything we know together.
 

awesomesauce

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#30
Well, no. By the time the bugs are worked out, we won't need to travel any more: we'll just jack into a VR drone at our destination and 'be there' over the Internet.

The companies pushing driverless cars are working on the wrong problem. It's like building a better buggy-whip when the first Model-T is about to leave the production line.

Although maybe they'll be of some use to move the drone bodies around to where they're most needed.
It seems like sending them off to the wilds of Scotland is the edge case application. Driverless cars as a just-in-time local transit solution have a lot of possibilities. Uber, without the drivers. Which is probably why Uber is so interested in them. It'll be a long time if ever before you have self driving cars taking themselves off to the backwoods of Scotland, but for urban transportation where you have the ability to fit infrastructure to support it, it would mean fewer people need to own cars to supplement existing transportation.

Same with trucks on major motorways; they don't need to be self-driving to every last little village, just between major distribution points and sorting centers. (Where robots can attach the local deliveries to drones. ;) )

As a cyclist, I'd much rather navigate in traffic with driverless cars than human drivers talking on their phones or texting or drinking coffee and putting on makeup and singing along to the music or turned around shouting at their kids or distracted by the argument they just had with their boss or their boyfriend. I don't have to worry about if driverless cars are sober.

There are legitimate concerns about security and safety. If Internet of Things companies have taught us anything, it's that people designing network enabled objects tend to have a big blind spot where network security should be. And people testing these things need to make sure their cars can, for instance, see dark skinned pedestrians. But on the whole, I'd rather have computers operating the fast moving heavy machines in my environment than humans using personal and arbitrary definitions of which traffic rules are important.

Personally, though, I think trains need to make a comeback. Proper high speed rail. Japan has fantastic trains; I don't understand why we can't have that in Europe.
 
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Robert Zwilling

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#31
Personally, though, I think trains need to make a comeback.
I would like to see a mass transportation system that is underground and elevated in such a way that there are no footprints on the land. The overhead system would be a huge webwork that carries people and goods locally and far distances. Lots of local connections and long stretches connecting the local webs. Use fast and slow transports. Ideally it would also be able to pipe huge volumes of water from one place to another. Maybe it could also distribute power and data.
 

Edward M. Grant

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#32
It'll be a long time if ever before you have self driving cars taking themselves off to the backwoods of Scotland, but for urban transportation where you have the ability to fit infrastructure to support it, it would mean fewer people need to own cars to supplement existing transportation.
But it's easier for a computer to drive in the backwoods of Scotland than in a city with far more hazards to negotiate. You rarely find nuns leading groups of special-ed kids across the road through a blizzard in Scottish woods.

And, again, VR will kill travel in cities almost as well as it kills travel between cities. About the only thing we still go downtown for sometimes is a music concert, and it will soon be much easier to attend those in VR than person.

Personally, though, I think trains need to make a comeback. Proper high speed rail. Japan has fantastic trains; I don't understand why we can't have that in Europe.
High-speed rail is incredibly expensive, and applying nineteenth-century solutions to twenty-first century problems. More than that, it's only viable in a high-trust society where you don't get asshats putting rocks on the lines to kill people.
 

awesomesauce

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#33
I would like to see a mass transportation system that is underground and elevated in such a way that there are no footprints on the land. The overhead system would be a huge webwork that carries people and goods locally and far distances. Lots of local connections and long stretches connecting the local webs. Use fast and slow transports. Ideally it would also be able to pipe huge volumes of water from one place to another. Maybe it could also distribute power and data.
Using above-ground space, we'd need to consider the impact on avian wildlife, and especially in dense urban areas, how much sunlight reaches the ground. Underground comes with a different set of difficulties, especially in already dense cities. I'd love to see more solutions that create natural and car-free spaces in urban areas, though. Are you familiar with 2030palette.org?
 

awesomesauce

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#37
Hasn't this gone a little off-topic?

But if AIs took over the writing of this thread we'd now be discussing matter transporter transfer booths as an option.
Edit: I cross-posted with @awesomesauce
I think it's because when anyone says "AI" everyone goes immediately to self driving cars these days.

We don't wanna go to matter transporters here... I've been rewatching Star Trek and now I have so many questions.
 

Robert Zwilling

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#38
AI is everywhere but I guess we only see it when there is no one sitting in the driver's seat. The rest of the time it is completely accepted, except by some big name techies. It seems to be more about packaging data than about making decisions. For some unknown reason it reminds me of Catch 22 when the only time Captain Major is in is when he isn't there. Packing people into transport systems reading books or packing words into a story extolling the virtues of mass transport, it all gets overlapped before you know it.
 

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