Film Classics - what are they?

BAYLOR

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Some Like It Hot 1959
Breakfast at Tiffany's 1961
The Odd Couple 1968
Tough Guys 1986
 

paeng

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I think it's Gandhi.

Try lists like these:



There are over half-a-million features listed in IMDB, and excluding short fims and TV shows.

Assuming that you can watch one new movie ("new" means something you haven't seen, even if it's old) every week for the next fifty years, and around 50 weeks a year (given a two-week break per annum), you would be able to watch only around 2,500 films.

Presumably, you would watch a movie because it's great, then for the next six days rewatch it or parts of it and then write and think about what you saw, then do the same for the next film the following week. Also, the selection would represent different countries, decades, and even genres.

One might be tempted to select based on one's preferences, but keep in mind that preferences are ultimately based on range of choice. For many directors, critics, etc., such choices might involve having seen thousands of movies vs. average viewers who will only get to watch around a new movie a month. Hence, the two lists above.

Finally, the same might apply to books, music, etc.
 

farntfar

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There are a whole bunch of [usually non-English language] films that are highly rated by critics but rarely if ever seen by the general public.
From the BFI Top 10 alone there are; Jeanne Dielman, 23 quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles [1975], Tokyo Story [1953], In the Mood for Love [2000], Beau travail [1998] and Man with a Movie Camera [1929].
I am sure they are all worthy of their placing.
I think I have seen Tokyo Story, but as for the others? Not so much.
And I read somewhere that Jeanne Dielman... was only available in the UK [via the BFI] in the 2020s.

If we're opening up the list to include foreign language films then we have to include the French New Wave, as it changed the way films were made everywhere. They were mostly distributed in English as well
So. Some examples
Les 400 coups (The 400 Blows)
Jules et Jim (Jules and Jim)
A bout de Souffle (Breathless)
and of course Et Dieu Créa la Femme (And God created woman)

But coming back to Hollywood films I would add
Bringing up Baby
And definitely Guess who's coming to dinner.

Has Gone with the wind been mentioned
or High Noon?
 

Judderman

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Before reading the last post I was going to put Gone With The Wind. One of the real classics, along with Casablanca mentioned earlier.
Maybe The Ten Commandments.
Nosferatu.
 

Ian

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I think when discussing "classic" films, a huge disclaimer is required. Many of them have recently been remade, and virtually all the remakes are decidedly inferior to the originals. Also, I'm kind of losing track by this point, but has anyone mentioned "The Man in the White Suit" (1951) It's usually regarded as just a cute Ealing comedy, when it's actually one of the greatest SF films of all time. Oh yeah - any sign of 2001 : a space odyssey?
 

KiraAnn

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I think when discussing "classic" films, a huge disclaimer is required. Many of them have recently been remade, and virtually all the remakes are decidedly inferior to the originals.
In all fairness, I would point out the The Maltese Falcon (1941) with Bogey was the 3rd rendition, and is certainly the best.
 

Ian

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In all fairness, I would point out the The Maltese Falcon (1941) with Bogey was the 3rd rendition, and is certainly the best.
No argument there, but in recent years (off the top of my head) we've been "treated" to the likes of "Get Carter", "The Haunting" "The Magnificent Seven", "Alfie" "The Italian Job" (why do they pick on Michael Caine movies?) "The day the Earth stood still" etc. If you're unfortunate to run into any of these instead of the originals, you'll be wondering what all the fuss is about.
 

Vladd67

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No argument there, but in recent years (off the top of my head) we've been "treated" to the likes of "Get Carter", "The Haunting" "The Magnificent Seven", "Alfie" "The Italian Job" (why do they pick on Michael Caine movies?) "The day the Earth stood still" etc. If you're unfortunate to run into any of these instead of the originals, you'll be wondering what all the fuss is about.
If you are listing remakes of Caine's films don't forget Sleuth.
 

farntfar

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I thought that was quite a decent remake.
Not as good as the original, but far better than, say, The Wicker Man.
 

Vladd67

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I did love the trailer for the new Wicker Man that made it look like a comedy.
 

BAYLOR

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Beau James 1957 staring Bob Hope, Daren McGavin and Vera Miles . A film about New York Mayor Jimmy Walker . This is serious dramatic for Hope and, he's terrific .:cool:
 

CupofJoe

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Judgement at Nuremberg [1961]
It Happened One Night [1934]
and because there aren't enough comedies being listed...
Airplane! [1980]

In a half way serious position, I don't think any film under 20-25 years old should be considered for "classic" status. I feel they need to stand the test of time.
As an example, 10 years ago I might have said The Matrix [1999] was a classic to be, but I re-watched it recently and found it so dated.
Okay "bullet time" and the acrobatics still look cool but...
Maybe in another 10 years and it will found its place in my subjective listing.
 

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