Brent Weeks - anyone?

jizzah

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I too have read WoT several times and see absolutely no relationship between the two series. I wonder if you have really read Brent Weeks.
I've read all 3 books. And if you've 'read WoT several times', but not managed to see the similarities, I begin to wonder...

Let me point out a few.


Seal Folk and Sethi: Sea folk mark their families and rank via medallions/chains running across their cheeks. As do Sethi. Both seafaring races, both are comfortable going topless.

Children of the Light and the Lae'Knaught: Both hate channelers/mages/magae (whatever), both have no real homeland-therefore are independant armies answerable only to themselves. Same symbol is used by the pairing, as is their nickname (children) and what they say they fight for (the light).

The Chantry: Member's called 'sisters', describe the casting/making of spells as 'weaving', home is on an island.

The White tower: Members are sisters, weave spells, home-an island...

Ow, and Sister Ariel? Reeks of Verin Sedai.


Rand Al Thor: Dragon tattoos on his arms.

Logan. Dragon tattoo on his arm,


Swordforms by both authors as good as identically decribed.


Bonding: Both series have it. Both use them in much the same way. Both have forms of compulsion (look at Logain's bonding of the sisters sent to destroy the Black Tower) as well as the ability to sense both the partners direction and distance as well as their condition.

Curoch and Callandor: Focuses increasing the amount of power wieldable.





Rebuttal?
 
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biodroid

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I too have read WoT several times and see absolutely no relationship between the two series. I wonder if you have really read Brent Weeks.
I agree, I don't see any resemblance either. But then again which author doesn't "borrow" from another author. Kylar is an assassin, I don 't see any other resemblance to RJ's characters in WOT.

I finished the book over the weekend and thought it was great for a first timer and would like to read the rest.

I hope he doesn't stay in one world like Jordan and Feist.
 

jizzah

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Feist, another author who's stuff's represented in the dark angel trilogy. Guilds and how tough life is in the gutter, thieves, murder, prostitution and movement from said lifestyle to the nobility (Jimmy the hand). A 'queen' drawing life from others for their power, worshipped as a god (the Emerald Queen). Jeez, throw in a demon posessed axe or the world's greatest assassin and you've got Gemmell too.

Oops, assassin...


But right you are. A certain amount of every writer's stuff is borrowed. Just where does the line get drawn between borrowing and copywrite?
 

Althain's Warden

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@bio droid- to my knowledge he isn't staying in one world. I read a interview with him that says he is writing a new trilogy in a completely new world. That said he hasn't ruled out a 4th book to follow on from the current trilogy.
Jizzah there are some shared ideas amongst almost every fantasy author out there. For me a bigger rip off of Jordan was goodkind, the only real difference (imo) was that Goodkind rammed his philosophy into his books whereas Jordan didn't seem to bothered about preaching.(despite this i still quite enjoyed most of the sword of truth series, except book 7 :( that was awfull) That said every author i can think off has shared themes and ideas with others. If you can point me in the direction of a truly original author i'd be really chuffed !!
To those who have not finished the night angel trilogy, keep reading and enjoy !
Post back when you've finished :D
 

biodroid

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Althain - do you know if he is going to maybe include some world building and be a bit more epic?
 

jizzah

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For the truly original, you need to head back. Herbert, and Jules Verne both wrote fantasy and both with original ideas. Considering humans have been passing stories on long before publishers and authors appeared and reminding ourselves there's only 5 or so (or was it 7) stories that everyone else builds on, you have to give everyone a certain amount of leeway.

Herbert-
Wrote about empire spanning the galaxy, space travel moving beyond known boundries in physics, mutations, 'survival of the fittest' and other Darwinian ideals. All pretty radical for 1966...

Verne-
Was writing about submarine and space travel when children were still working in cotton mills. This guy wrote about what you're typing away on in ~1860.
 

biodroid

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Verne-
Was writing about submarine and space travel when children were still working in cotton mills. This guy wrote about what you're typing away on in ~1860.
What they wrote is now currently the future. Where can we go with ideas, I always thought about cyborgs in a sense that we can plug ourselves into computers and talk to them with our minds etc. Most SF nowadays is more about action and adventure with a futuristic background where I prefer to read about current times instead, unless it is thought provoking enough to hold my attention. If it could be put into book form I like SF stories like Fringe and Lost, the mysterious and edgy and dark stuff rather than just plain action all the time.
 

Althain's Warden

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Not sure BioDroid i read it a few weeks ago. Lol Weeks ! :D Honestly that wasn't intended :) Erm anyway my sad sense of humour aside i'll try and refind it and let you know. :D
 

Althain's Warden

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Here's what Brent said in an interview
"However, the idea I've fallen in love with right now is set in a new world. Cool new magic, cool new characters. I'm setting at least one major fantasy trope on its head, and taking some others in unexpected directions. If you like deep, conflicted characters and surprises and lots of action, you'll like it. If you don't, go watch a movie, mouth-breather. Just kidding. Right now, I've got about fifty pages of notes and outlines and four different possible first chapters written.
I'm aiming at a stand-alone novel, and I promise not to spin it out in a
trilogy for a trilogy's sake. I really believe in writing exactly as much as the story demands-and no more."

Couldn't find out anymore, hope that helps :)
 

zhex00

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I read the trilogy in a oner and while I can say I did enjoy it, I found the author plagiarizing Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time constantly. The White Tower, Children of the Light, bonding between Warders and Sedai, Compulsion, Fortelling, the list carries on.

In fact, I saw him ripping off Jordan's books on such a regular basis, I doubt I'll bother handing any more of my hard-earned cash over for future publications from this author. I'd rather spend my money on ideas that at least seem fresh. Still, robbing other writer blind aside, the guy's got natural talent in building his storylines.

So, IMO, if you either havn't read the Wheel of Time series or don't mind reading something that's so obviously stolen. Week's is a good read. Captivating, deep and with a good tempo. They were hard to put down.

If you have read J.R.'s WoT series and prefer originality, do yourself a favour and pass this guy's stuff. You'll spend more time wondering why the hell he can't think up his own ideas as anything else.
That is pure rubbish!
Jordan´s books are boring and even if, and I disagree with that, the ideas were stollen, they would have been upgraded.
 
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