Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials Trilogy

orionsixwings

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managed to grab me a copy of the first two books and I am already hooked on this story. no doubt that it would soon be converted into film soon, so I joined message boards for it already.

Anyway, back to the books. Pullman's style is very good. The story is somewhat a cross between sci-fi and fantasy with a bit of religion in it (although most of it can be considered allegories). Love the way he describes things -- especially from the point of view of an 11-year-old protagonist. You get to see the events from her point of view, but understand it from yours too.

Anyone here who has read this piece of work? If you haven't, you should. It's really good.
 

Thadlerian

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His Dark Materials... ooh, yes!
Like you, I got hooked right away. I think it was the setting most of all. Alternative reality with dæmons, clockwork and just a little touch of steampunk. But just as much the Lyra character. Strong and flawed, that's how it should be :)

Philip Pullman strikes me as a man who knows precisely what he's doing. He understands the formula, and uses it excellently. He writes Young Adult fiction that truly respects the reader, challenging their intelligence and norms. He's quite on par with Astrid Lindgren, which is probably why he won the recently founded Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award.

Northern Lights/The Golden Compass seems to me to be the ideal YA Fantasy, even though it alone presents themes more mature than a lot of adult fantasy. The maturity progresses through book 2 and 3, although it may be a bit much of the good thing.

I've also read Count Karlstein, which goes more along the lines of Magical Realism, and is nearly as excellent.
 

orionsixwings

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Wow! Thanks for that. I wanted to expand my library and those books might just be what I need.

Anyway, I really found the theme and plot of the stories too dark for chilren---yet the books are in the children's book section in the bookstore.

I love the way he wrote the convo's, gives you a clear picture of the person. You immediately see the difference between speakers. Love his style.
 

HieroGlyph

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I also read this trilogy after some friends recommended them...

S
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S

I quite enjoyed them. But... I never did fathom the point of dæmons though. I expected a decent explanation. I also lost the whole reason for the Amber Glass itself as a use within Will and Lyra's story... (sorry, I know: not aimed at older adults!) I still enjoyed them!!!

Guess I am a sore bear. I read these with the possible hope of getting my friends to read a recommendation of mine, but.... *sob* No luck! What is that about? Grown men prefering Pullman over Erikson or Bakker!?!

I do wonder why the original poster is so keen to see Dark Materials on the big screen though. Books are better, yeah? Besides, we all want Gemmel on the big screen!!!

I havent forgotten Astrid Lindgren quite yet, btw :)

(sry, not in the most agreeable mood, am I...)
 

orionsixwings

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Well, the dæmons issue is I believe related to the concept that there is a separate entity inside humans called a "Soul" , except in Lyra's world the soul is not inside, it's outside, and it is really 'separate' as in a living breathing being/creature/entity, connected but not physically part of, the human.

Good thing there aren't any Dementors in her world --- can you imagine if there were and they'd feed on souls? That would be a totally gruesome story!
 

euphemist

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I read them and loved them. Have since cooerced a number of friends to do the same.

I tried reading some of his other books but couldn't get into them.
 

GOLLUM

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You can addd me to the list of Pullman fans, I qiute enjoyed the books and found them something of page turner.
 

orionsixwings

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Don't say it! I haven't finished with it yet!

lol!

I love the way he flawed the characters --- that was really very clever. I hate Mary Sues and almost impossible character perfection -- even in fantasy there can never be anyone without flaws.
 

orionsixwings

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I'm glad that this is moved to YA section, but feel like it should have it's own section. Because if JK merits her own section, Philip Pullman should have one for himself too.
 

orionsixwings

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Oh alright.

Back to topic --- heheheh!

The concept of having one's soul outside, animate and tangible, instead of what is normally believed as a spirit entity that only takes shape after death is a strange concept for me. But quite clever.
 

Foxtale

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<_< The ending is so sad though.

Anyways, I like the idea of demons like how they've done it.
 

orionsixwings

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Foxtale said:
<_< The ending is so sad though.

Anyways, I like the idea of demons like how they've done it.


Lol! you sound like Will --- its dæmons, and yes, I love that concept too. I would love to have a real dæmons of my own, will name him Ryjel or Euridicae, and it will be a Bengal Tiger once it's settled, but right now it shifts from black kitten, to Siberian Hamster, to White Tabby, to Bengal Tiger, and its largest form so far is a Stallion.
 

Green Knight

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"Questions posed" by His Dark Materials Trilogy

May as well continue the thread from elsewhere about what questions are posed by this epic.

Where to begin?

Pullman himself has gone on record saying that he didn’t set out to write a fantasy book as such (*cough* yeah right) but that he set out to address a particular issue in a new way. The central theme, as far as I can make out, is the journey from Innocence to Experience. Sort of ‘coming of age’ only not quite so simple. He took the concepts of Innocence and Experience from William Blake, and seems to go with the notion that there are good and bad elements to both.

Pullman definitely goes against expectation by strongly implying that childhood is NOT an ideal, idyllic state, but very definitely lacking something important, which growing up gives us. The difficult thing is not to lose the qualities of childhood when one attains the extra gifts of maturity.

I will stop waffling at this point and let someone else have a go… Pullman is exhilarating to read, but exhausting to try and analyse. :)
 

orionsixwings

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Another note relating to childhood -- it was interesting that Lyra found her childhood with Roger and lost it with Will. Had they met in different circumstances would the outcome be the same?
 

orionsixwings

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I've got a question about this book series.

IT deals with DUST, and other worlds, and stuff, but, is it considered MAGIC? The way Lyra's DUST moves the Aleithiometer, the way Will's Dust helps him use the Subtle Knife, and the way the Intention Craft is used --- Can it be considered Magic?
 

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