V for Vendetta

Dancer

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Oct 17, 2005
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I haven't read this comic, it's written by Alan Moore so I'm assuming that it's good, this thread is to people who have read it, please discuss it here and I'll decided based on your comics if it's worth my precious money.
 

Shoegaze99

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Dancer said:
I haven't read this comic, it's written by Alan Moore so I'm assuming that it's good, this thread is to people who have read it, please discuss it here and I'll decided based on your comics if it's worth my precious money.
You got it, chief.
 

Jayaprakash Satyamurthy

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Definitely. Worth it.

I first followed this story in the pages of the late, lamented Warrior, where it appeared in black and white - a format that suited David Lloyd's moody art brilliantly. Then, of course, being such an excellent mag, Warrior went under. Luckily, DC soon picked up the series and released it, coloured this time. It was the first time a comic story really made me think, and re-reading it recently I find that the story has really held up well over time.

Most of all, you need to ask yourself: is V a terrorist or not? And why did you answer the way you just did?

Anyway, definitely a worthwhile purchase. I don't know how much of Alan Moore's work you've read, but, along with the Marvelman story (aka Miracleman) and the Bojeffries Saga (a quirky tale about working-class genetic anomalies in the UK), also from the pages of Warrior, V For Vendetta is one of Moore's early masterpieces and still stands comfortably on par with later career highlights like The Swamp Thing saga or Watchmen.
 

drstrange

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i read this book a couple of months ago,it's been one of those book's i've wanted to read,but there's alway's something else first.anyway, the book is fantastic i'd recommend it to everyone,it leaves you wanting more and more,buy the edition with the extra material as it offers a little bit more to the story.i'm not going to give anything away,thts not my style-buy-read-enjoy-read again.
 

Jason_Taverner

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I've never read it but i am waiting for the film but I know its been put back because of the londong bombings but it looks fantastic I lovethe face does anyone know when the film is getting it release
 

mikeo

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Given that Alan Moore has gone out of his way to say he's had nothing to do with the movie, I'm not sure quite what it's going to be like. Perhaps if you've not read it, you shouldn't do until you see the film - that way you can't be dissapointed. =/

Ah yeah - the release date is sometime in March, I think. I was reading a post from someone elsewhere suggesting that in keeping with all the changes they were apparently making to the storyline, they should also change the tagline from "Remember remember, the 5th of November" to "Beware the Ides of March." :D
 

Shoegaze99

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Jason_Taverner said:
I've never read it but i am waiting for the film
Why would you wait for the film when you have a fantastically written and drawn graphic novel out there just waiting to be read?

Besides, the screenplay changes some key elements of the original story - in the film version, the Nazis won World War II and took over England - sapping some of the impact out of the dystopian world Moore creates.

Also, why would you wait for the film?
 

Jayaprakash Satyamurthy

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They made the Nazis the villains? What a crock. The whole point of the scenario in V is that it was your own leaders in the UK becoming fascists. So this is basically gonna be some hash-up of V and The Man in the High Castle by Philip K Dick, another author whose ideas the Whatacrockski brothers shamelessly pilfered earlier. :eek:

Anyway, I reckon it's best to read the comic and be done with it. It is the original anyway. Plus, remember why Umberto Eco refused to give out movie rights to his novels after The Name of the Rose - not because he hated the movie, but more and more people were coming to the book after the movie, and had Sean Connery's voice in their head rather than his character, Father Baskerville's, and so on - which he felt narrowed their appreciation fo the book, and made him feel kinda left out too.
 

Shoegaze99

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knivesout said:
The whole point of the scenario in V is that it was your own leaders in the UK becoming fascists.
Exactly. By altering that part of the story, the entire cautionary aspect of the tale is tossed out the window. Eliminate the notion that the citizens practically brought the fascist state upon themselves by, to paraphrase Benjamin Franklin, trading freedom for security is essential to the world Moore creates and to the struggle of the protagonist. By changing this fundamental part of the story, it in large measure becomes just another alternate history tale rather than a cautionary work in the realm of Brave New World and 1984.
 

TheDeeMan

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I really liked the movie. So now I'm afraid to read the book. I mean judging from how utterly superior the "League of Extraordinary Gentlemen" book was to that movie I'm afraid the same will hold for "V..." and it'll dim my view of the movie.

Dee
 
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Duchessprozac

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The movie isn't a bad adaption of the book, It changed much and omitted loads but somehow managed to convey much the same story and ideas that the book did. I found I enjoy both versions equally. The film is more action orientated, the book more thoughtful.

I was dissapointed they didn't have V spout the opening line of Sympathy For The Devil when he introduces himself to the priest, though. My one real gripe with the movie.
 

DeepThought

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You have Huxley's Brave New World, Orwell's Nineteen-Eighty-Four; two of the greatest literary classics ever wrote on the subject of dystopian futures. IMHO Alan Moore's V for Vendetta is their equivalent albeit in comics medium. Definitely worth it I'd say...;).


Cheers, DeepThought
 

Steve S

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Oct 6, 2006
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I am a very recent convert to comics/graphic novels but have enjoyed V for Vendetta as much as anything I have read - the word is overused but I think it is a masterpiece.

Although it is very different I did enjoy the film as well!
 

woodsman

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The film was (IMHO) £@#* compared to the book, I see why Moore distanced himself!

Buy it, I can't believe our local libary didn't have this among all the other run of the mill comics and had an augument with the head honcho, to no avail
 

Brian G Turner

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Just re-watched this.

Didn't really think much of it originally. Appreciated it far more this time, probably because these days it seems far more relevant.
 
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I haven't read the comic either, but it's on my list. The movie was great!
League of Extraordinary Gentlemen isn't the same, because the movie was crap. :)
 

MemoryTale

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I thought comparing the film and book was quite interesting really. The book is fantastic, but it does have weaknesses. The film fixed these for the most part, but gained all new weaknesses.
 
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