Faerie Tale

Elyssandrel

Ely the Faery
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I really liked this book.
I found it quite scary in places though. Lol.
I thought his use of old folklore interesting as I'm interested in mythology and tales.
Any thoughts on this book?
 

Ash

Strong Silent Typist
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Aug 12, 2005
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It's been a long, long time since I read it, but I remember enjoying it. I quite like that kind of blend of genres.

If you like the mix of fantasy, mythology and folklore (especially British) with a little horror thrown in it might be worth checking out Robert Holdstock (specifically Mythago Wood). Another one to check out might be Neil Gaiman's American Gods which straddles the same genres as well (but is quite different).
 

Elyssandrel

Ely the Faery
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Ash said:
It's been a long, long time since I read it, but I remember enjoying it. I quite like that kind of blend of genres.

If you like the mix of fantasy, mythology and folklore (especially British) with a little horror thrown in it might be worth checking out Robert Holdstock (specifically Mythago Wood). Another one to check out might be Neil Gaiman's American Gods which straddles the same genres as well (but is quite different).
Thanks for the suggestions. I'll check them out. :D
 

Elyssandrel

Ely the Faery
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nixie said:
It's a long time since I read this,but it is an excellent read.Nothing sweet about these faeries;)
Nothing sweet at all! Those pesky piskies!
(I'm from Cornwall!)
 

Foxtale

Send in the foxes!
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Jan 30, 2006
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Haha, I just got this book from a used bookstore expecting the classic fantasy read, or at best a close carbon-copy of Bitterbynde (though Feist came first I think). Boy was I wrong. Rarely has there been a book I just couldn't put down (apart from the Saga of Seven Suns), and the characters were pretty real, though in another world. I think the only problem was how fast the book breezed over the whole faerie world, and it was disappointing to see them all lose their memories of the events, and lose a bit of character development with it. But it was a great book, combining a bit of Conspiracy Theory of men in black (I spotted the reference, did you?) and traditional faerie myths, which I love to read about.
 

Tinuva

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Aug 29, 2006
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I agree with Foxtale about the disappointments, but they were quite minor for me and i did enjoy this book. I still prefer his other works such as the riftwar series though.
 

The Upright Man

Science fiction fantasy
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Oct 24, 2006
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363
awesome book as i love feist and Irish folk lore mixed with the modern reality of poxy americans in trouble, yet again as i may as well add
 

TomServo

Rowesdower saves us
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Apr 19, 2006
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Hey all, I'm a regular on the Martin forums and have been looking through books in the interum between his books. I just picked up this one and am only a little way through it. So far I am enjoying it and want to know how this one ranks among his others. Martin takes a while between his books so I may need some more to get me through the wait.
 

Arutha

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Dec 5, 2006
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none of feists books would make good movies, plainly because thy would have to cut them down so much it almost wouldnt be worth it. in my opinion every word in his books are just as important to the storyline as the last. for example in shards of a broken crown would they be able to do all the stuff pug does, every battle and every planning scene and every pug vs patrick scene and erik and roo scene. i dont think so and i think everyone here would agree that every part is essential. they would have to make the movie 5 hours long just to make it coherant
 

Fainne

Fainne at this end
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Feb 9, 2007
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You know... Faerie Tale is probably the only one I HAVEN'T read.

But if it has Labrynth influences as previously mentioned I may have to pick it up. Good idea?
 

pyan

Great Old One
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I'd like to know, too - I've read all the Riftwar books, but never been inclined to pick this up. Perhaps the title put me off, but I'd like to see any advice.
 

sanityassassin

he's the madcap pusher
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land of the rigante
it is a good book but it is nothing like the riftwar books. It is set in the real world can't remember where exactly but I'm thinking NE USA. A family move into a old house and some strange things start to happen. Here is a couple of reviews taken from Amazon

Editorial Reviews
From Publishers Weekly
Feist, author of the popular Magician fantasy trilogy, turns to the horror genre in this slick, only partially successful novel of a very modern family newly settled into a house on the edge of an enchanted woods. Each member of the familyretired actress Gloria Hastings, her novelist and screenwriter husband Phil, his teenage daughter by a previous marriage, their twin eight-year-old boys, and a dog and a catis touched in some way by "the Bad Thing," as the boys call it, which turns out to be a forest spirit out of ancient folklore. Feist builds atmosphere with intimations of the supernatural that soon escalate into outright violence. It is the boys who most clearly perceive the Bad Thing, and who eventually confront and defeat it. While the plot has some intriguing features, the book is afflicted by a superficiality of characterization and a flat, uninteresting style.

From Library Journal
Californians Gloria and Philip Hastings migrate to upstate New York to live in an old farmhouse near a stretch of virgin forest. The three Hastings children are soon caught up in a love-hate relationship with Celtic creatures of mythology that inhabit the dark and mysterious wood. An oft-told tale of a new family in a haunted house/land, this better-than-average dark fantasy novel features solid writing, strong development of both human and nonhuman characters, and a well-realized sense of geography. A tantalizing sense of foreboding permeates the novel and makes it highly readable. By the author of Magician.
 

Joel007

Shiny! Let's be bad guys.
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My prawns have asthma
I liked his portrayal and explanations about faeries. The storyline was quite interesting too. I'd say its worth a read :)

You already know vaguely what's going to happen just from the title, but the reactions of each of the characters and the ways they find out are very interesting.
 
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