May Reading Thread

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I restarted The Eyre Affair by Jasper Fforde, because I felt that I was missing something. I still feel that I'm missing something. So far, it strikes me as just plain odd. There are SF, fantasy, crime and alternate history elements, but they don't seem to fit together very well. Maybe it will make more sense as I go on.
 
I restarted The Eyre Affair by Jasper Fforde, because I felt that I was missing something. I still feel that I'm missing something. So far, it strikes me as just plain odd. There are SF, fantasy, crime and alternate history elements, but they don't seem to fit together very well. Maybe it will make more sense as I go on.
It is, as are all of them, more than a little odd. I recall I was very unsure about it for probably the first half of the book but somehow, as I got more familiar with it's quirkiness, I grew to like it quite a lot. I have found all of them enjoyable but not outstanding. So I'm not exactly rushing out to read them all but I probably read around one of his books a year.
 
I've read most of his books (some of the Nursery Crime series yet to read.) I think that I wasn't familiar enough with Jane Eyre to get all the jokes in the Eyre Affair. I also like his standalone books best - The Constant Rabbit, Early Riser and especially Shades of Grey. Thanks for this prompt - it looks like he has finally produced the sequel to Shades of Grey, called Red Side Story (So another book for the reading pile!)
 
Necrotek by Jonathan Maberry.
Blurb says "A combination of military SF and horror"

It's a bit pedestrian so far, here's hoping it'll pick up a bit
 
Patrick O'Brian's The Yellow Admiral, a late entry in the Aubrey-Maturin series that I have been reading in order.
 
Patrick O'Brian's The Yellow Admiral, a late entry in the Aubrey-Maturin series that I have been reading in order.
Rather sadly my next one up of those is Blue at the Mizzen, the last complete story. It's been an enjoyable ride, some better than others, but generally all on the very good side.
 
Necrotek by Jonathan Maberry.
Blurb says "A combination of military SF and horror"

It's a bit pedestrian so far, here's hoping it'll pick up a bit
Errors like this annoy me in modern stories, they get past 'spell check' but surely a proof-reader should pick it up.

The barren of the Gun flared with a crystal-blue light. The capsule vanished within an envelope of shimmering energy that rippled and swirled and swelled and . . .
 
Errors like this annoy me in modern stories, they get past 'spell check' but surely a proof-reader should pick it up.

The barren of the Gun flared with a crystal-blue light. The capsule vanished within an envelope of shimmering energy that rippled and swirled and swelled and . . .
I'm fully convinced that even the traditional publishers don't bother to proof read properly any longer. I suspect they just run it through something like Grammarly, if that. I'm currently reading The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August which is traditionally published (Redhook; an imprint of Hachette) and it is filled with similar errors, all of which would pass a spell checker. Intensely annoying! And I've had the same issues with books from big name authors like Hamilton, Asher et al.
 
Recently read two Star Trek titles:

Savage Trade: Revisits the premise of "The Savage Curtain", in which shape-shifting aliens who can portray historic personages from Earth's past forced Kirk and company to fight a campaign of good versus evil -- Lincoln vs Genghis Khan, etc. Here, some of those aliens have been trapped into human forms like Washington and Harriet Tubman. They're seeking Federation asylum. Completely absurd but enjoyable enough.

Burning Dreams -- a biographical novel of Pike. We find him growing up on a colony world and gaining strength through adversity. Quite good, but Anson Mount has made Pike my favorite so there's a bit of inflation there.
 
I haver a soft spot for some of the older Star Trek books. Not read one in a while, though.
 
I haver a soft spot for some of the older Star Trek books. Not read one in a while, though.

Depends on we're counting as old. The numbered novels were usually formulaic and varied widely in quality, depending on the author. Quality drastically improved after Marco Palmieri took over, and the Relaunch books (2004 - 2021) had a stable of excellent writing talent. Some of them are still writing (David Mack), but there are newer faces these days.
 
Just finished Ghost Story by Peter Straub. Really enjoyed it. With a large ensemble of characters, he still manages to make all of them well drawn and unique. A great example of bringing a whole community to life, and the supernatural villains are great too.

Before that finished Angelmaker by Nick Harkaway. It's got some beautifully written sections but is uneven. A weird, over the top mix of spy thriller and steampunk. A major character's transformation towards the end felt a bit too abrupt.
 
TROUBLEMAKERS, by Harlan Ellison, 2001.
Stories. Ellison wanted to be known as a
FantaFantas
 
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