April Reading Thread

Status
Not open for further replies.

The Judge

Truth. Order. Moderation.
Staff member
Supporter
Joined
Nov 10, 2008
Messages
14,982
Location
nearly the New Forest
I finished another two books at the end of March, Slow Bullets by Alistair Reynolds – an SF novella where a convict ship wakes from hibo sleep thousands of years after it set off and discovers aliens have destroyed civilisation everywhere (interesting characters and thought-provoking as to atonement and starting again, though I couldn’t buy in to the first person narration) and Seraphina by Rachel Hartman, the first in a fantasy series about a girl who is half-human, half-dragon (very enjoyable, and I’ll try and write up a full review at some point).

I’m starting April with two novels on the go – another historical murder mystery, An Honourable Thief by Douglas Skelton (Scotland in 1715 and the stirrings of the first Jacobite rising) and another fantasy, The Ten Thousand Doors of January by Alix E Harrow (a young girl finds doors leading to adventure) – as well as a collection of SF short stories, Sideways in Time by Murray Leinster.

What are you reading this month?
 
Seraphina by Rachel Hartman, the first in a fantasy series about a girl who is half-human, half-dragon (very enjoyable, and I’ll try and w
I read that one a few years ago, and I enjoyed it, too. Will be interested in your review.
 
Over the weekend finished Lonely Vigils by Manly Wade Wellman, a story collection featuring three occult detective. Four stories feature Judge Hilary Pursuivant (solid stories with one, "The Black Drama," standing out), one story features Professor Enderby (negligible tale, somewhat misogynistic) and fifteen stories feature John Thunstone. While you can see Wellman's professionalism and invention with the others, he hits his stride with Thunstone. Thunstone combines the knowledge of a John Silence (Algernon Blackwood's occult sleuth) with the physicality of a Black Mask private eye; that sounds like there's a lot of action, and there is some, and well-described, but Wellman frequently refers to scholarship as backing Thunstone's actions, much of it from real books.

I'd planned on reading a few of these stories and setting the book aside so I didn't grow tired of it. I ended up reading to the end because Wellman was adept at ringing changes on his themes, making these stories -- especially the Thunstone stories -- very entertaining.
 
I read The Ten Thousand Doors Of January by Alix E. Harrow a few weeks ago and liked it. The writing magic and doors were the aspect that I liked most. The main character could perhaps be a little more interesting, but overall it was pretty good.

I've just read Kitty Cat Kill Sat: A Feline Space Adventure by Argus. Human civilization has fallen, leaving a cat called Lily in charge of an orbital weapons platform (built around an alien artifact). Can Lily survive long enough to save the human race from monsters emerging from another dimension? The book was a lot of fun with pretty good world building for such a silly premise. If I had a criticism it would be that the book loses focus a little in the middle, with a certain amount of repetition and a superfluity of cats. There is a fun joke about dealing with spam callers. I believe it was originally published in an episodic format, which explains some of the structural issues with the novel. The book also contains a "dog". Recommended.
 
I read Josiah Bancroft's An Empyreal Retinue, a short story collection set in the world of his Babel series, although some of the stories are more like 'deleted scenes' from the series rather than stories in their own right. One of the fascinating things about the series was discovering new part of the titular tower and I think Into the Misanthropolis, which explores a dystopian ringdom of bureaucrats, was one of the highlights. The title story, which is the only one to be set after the events of the series, probably has the most interesting narrative. I think fans of the series should find this collection interesting, but it's not really essential.

I've now started Daniel Abraham's Blade of Dreams, the second book in his Kithimar trilogy. The biggest issue I had with the first book was that I didn't really like the characters that much, I think so far that this one might work better for me.
 
I've now started Daniel Abraham's Blade of Dreams, the second book in his Kithimar trilogy. The biggest issue I had with the first book was that I didn't really like the characters that much, I think so far that this one might work better for me.
I'd be interested in what you think about it. I finished Age of Ash only a couple of weeks ago, after it had been lying around half-read for months. I also didn't care for the two main characters and found their respective obsessions annoying, but I understand it's the young lovers who are the focus of the second book, and I'm not sure I'd find them any more entertaining! (The character I was really intrigued by was the old man in the woods, and I'd like to know more of his backstory.)
 
I'm reading The Railway Navvies by Terry Coleman. I've always thought they'd be a great subject for an alternative history novel where the tunnel work uncovers an ancient secret or civilisation.

I also have Pyramids by Sir Terry Pratchett on my bedside, but the Navvies are winning out at the minute.
 
Relisten STARSHIP TROOPER, Robert A.

Heinlein. I Haven't seen the movies.
It's been a long time since I read this but I remember really enjoying. Comparisons with Enders Game and Joe Halderman Forever War? Only because of the futuristic type war setting etc (Does that genre have a name?!)
 
Just finished John Wyndham Day of the Triffids. I like the author's writing style / prose and the book laid out some vivid imagery for me, with a good apocalypse type setting. Some of the character building was a little short, with my mind wandering at times, but it is quite a small book so the pace was speedy. 8/10. I think I have read a fair few of Wyndham's now. I have the Kraken Wakens by my side here, but I have a couple of others before I return!
 
Just finished John Wyndham Day of the Triffids. I like the author's writing style / prose and the book laid out some vivid imagery for me, with a good apocalypse type setting. Some of the character building was a little short, with my mind wandering at times, but it is quite a small book so the pace was speedy. 8/10. I think I have read a fair few of Wyndham's now. I have the Kraken Wakens by my side here, but I have a couple of others before I return!
Just seen that your first post was about "Wasp" by Eric Frank Russell, @waterfall_manc - have you read "Next Of Kin" by the same author? If not, try it - it's quite similar, but totally different, if you know what I mean!
Oh, and a belated Welcome to the Chrons! :)
 
Just finished John Wyndham Day of the Triffids. I like the author's writing style / prose and the book laid out some vivid imagery for me, with a good apocalypse type setting. Some of the character building was a little short, with my mind wandering at times, but it is quite a small book so the pace was speedy. 8/10. I think I have read a fair few of Wyndham's now. I have the Kraken Wakens by my side here, but I have a couple of others before I return!

I do like his work Kraken is probably my favourite
 
Just seen that your first post was about "Wasp" by Eric Frank Russell, @waterfall_manc - have you read "Next Of Kin" by the same author? If not, try it - it's quite similar, but totally different, if you know what I mean!
Oh, and a belated Welcome to the Chrons! :)
I haven't but just had a scan and looks up my street! Thank you for the warm welcome too, the forum is great for picking up good tips!
 
A re-read of Ghostmaker by Dan Abnett.

Dan Abnett - Ghostmaker.jpg
 
Nathan Waqa - over the hills and far away, a mil SF

Some blurb from Goodreads:-

The decades-long war between humanity and the Kithoryhan Concord has ended, and in its aftermath, the millions of marines who battled across the stars for victory have returned to their homes battered, weary, and depleted.

Therapist Malcolm Garner has accepted an assignment from Central Command to counsel one of those marines; The war hero known to the populace as Kajan Venshakova.

But the bitter woman that he meets is nothing like the legend whose exploits have captured the imaginations of billions across the worlds of the Unified Human Alliance.

Pursuing greater insight of the warrior in his care, Malcolm enters into simulated recreations of her combat missions. And in them he will learn more about the true nature of the war than he ever thought possible
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Similar threads


Back
Top