March Reading Thread

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The Judge

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I have three novels carrying over from February, two of which I'll certainly be finishing in the next few days, both of them historical murder mysteries (another John Shakespeare set in Elizabethan England, this time with the plots surrounding Mary Queen of Scots, and another Sister Fidelma set in 665, this time in her home country of Ireland). I've also still got Age of Ashes by Daniel Abraham hanging over me, and I'm determined to finish it or dump it this month.

In addition, I've got two non-fiction books on the go. Exploring Avebury: The Essential Guide by Steve Marshall, a incredibly detailed book about Avebury and its surroundings with wonderful photos and illustrations, and Templars: The Knights Who Made Britain by Steve Tibble, about the Knights Templar, of course, interesting but somewhat repetitive.

So what are you reading this month?
 
I am currently busy with Little Dorrit by Charles Dickens and, a history book, The Last Duel: A True Story of Crime, Scandal and Trial by Combat in Medieval France by Eric Jager.
So far (at 130 out of something like 900 pages) I like Little Dorrit more than a Tale of Two Cities and Oliver Twist.
 
I’m not into reading at the moment, so Judge Dredd’s The Hundredfold Problem will be a DNF for me.

listening to The Hydrogen Sonata by Iain M. Banks. Read by Peter Kenny, it’s proving to be very enjoyable.
 
I’m not into reading at the moment, so Judge Dredd’s The Hundredfold Problem will be a DNF for me.

listening to The Hydrogen Sonata by Iain M. Banks. Read by Peter Kenny, it’s proving to be very enjoyable.
If I ever build a time-machine I'm going to go back and tell Iain to make Peter Kenny a character in one of the Culture books. He deserves it.
 
Just finished an oldie but goodie, Picnic on Paradise by Joanna Russ. Here's my GoodReads review,

"Plucked out of Greece in the time of Tiberius and plunked down in the far future, Alyx, whose short stories established her as a wily master thief and all around survivor, is assigned as an agent by a mysterious trans-temporal government agency to save civilians from the ravages of a corporate war on the planet Paradise. Having to trek across the planet in the throes of winter tests all of her skills, not to mention her patience with a group of people who have never endured danger and privation, who have had everything they wanted at their fingertips their entire lives, including the ability to extend their lives, and overcome disease and injury.

"This is a story about the responsibilities we take on in spite of our intentions, of resilience, loss, grief, love and redemption. You won't find many '60s sf/f novels with sharper satire or wrapped in a bigger heart."

What's interesting -- and I vaguely recall hearing this before -- is that the early short stories of Alyx are variations on Sword & Sorcery stories, though there's no magic in them. Then suddenly, viola, an s.f. novel with an explanation of how the one became the other. And, surprisingly, it works.
 
Shadow in Bronze by Lindsey Davis, book 2 of many in the Marcus Didius Falco novels. I caught on to them from a mention in @The Big Peat 's blog. They are historical fiction, set in Rome ~ 70 AD, and center around a Investigator (P.I. equivalent). The author writes in a 'noir toned' fashion, and something about that set in ancient Roman society just works. They are good fun, incorporating humour, mystery, and romance in what appears to be as accurate a depiction of Roman life at the time. So far, I'm enjoying them enough to consider continuing into the 18 additional published adventures.
 
Shadow in Bronze by Lindsey Davis, book 2 of many in the Marcus Didius Falco novels. I caught on to them from a mention in @The Big Peat 's blog. They are historical fiction, set in Rome ~ 70 AD, and center around a Investigator (P.I. equivalent). The author writes in a 'noir toned' fashion, and something about that set in ancient Roman society just works. They are good fun, incorporating humour, mystery, and romance in what appears to be as accurate a depiction of Roman life at the time. So far, I'm enjoying them enough to consider continuing into the 18 additional published adventures.

Yes! Glad someone took that rec and that you're enjoying them.
 
Just started another Patricia Highsmith - A Suspension of Mercy. Highsmith has become one of my favourite writers in any genre.
 
Starting this next:
IMG_3290.jpeg
 
Rob Wilkins "Terry Pratchett, a Life with Footnotes"
The authorised biography by his long-term PA/Assistant/etc/etc

I'm sure all Chrons Pratchettophiles will have already read this, but if not, you're in for a treat.

One cautionary note: if you've had much to do with dementia, particularly early onset, you may find the later chapters seriously tear-producing.
 
Rob Wilkins "Terry Pratchett, a Life with Footnotes"
The authorised biography by his long-term PA/Assistant/etc/etc

I'm sure all Chrons Pratchettophiles will have already read this, but if not, you're in for a treat.

One cautionary note: if you've had much to do with dementia, particularly early onset, you may find the later chapters seriously tear-producing.
Not got that one. And I must admit I struggle with many of his books. Yes they're very funny but sometimes I'm like, where's the plot? Which is how I'm feeling with The Last Continent. Its very funny but I find myself forgetting what the plot was. I find that with a lot of humorous books.
 
Not got that one. And I must admit I struggle with many of his books. Yes they're very funny but sometimes I'm like, where's the plot? Which is how I'm feeling with The Last Continent. Its very funny but I find myself forgetting what the plot was. I find that with a lot of humorous books.
Ah! But you're clearly not a Pratchettophile! Neither am I - I've only read four - but I enjoy one now and then.
 
Ah! But you're clearly not a Pratchettophile! Neither am I - I've only read four - but I enjoy one now and then.
I should say I am. I've read most of his books. Its a mood thing. My reading mood just changes. Often half way through a book. Right now I'm in the mood for hard SF, but I'm in the middle of a Pratchett
 
Well... two days of March, and most of February. A scifi trilogy that has been sitting on my shelf unread :eek: for almost thirty years. A trilogy in three paperbacks, inside a nice thick card slipcase with Chris Foss covers that form a triptych.

Yes, I'm talking about Foundation by Asimov. No idea why it's taken me so long to read the things, but there you are. I thought they were excellent - very enjoyable. I think if I'd read them as a kid or teenager (though I didn't have them then) I would have read them several times since (they're that type of book).

I also have Foundation's Edge - which is almost as long as the original trilogy combined - but it was written thirty years later so I'm in two minds about reading it.
 
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