Roman Army did Queen song?

Brian G Turner

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I seem to remember reading a reference in a book on ancient Rome about the marching rhythm of the Roman army - and although the book didn't say so, I was given the distinct impression that the rhythm would have sounded a lot like Queen's "We Will rock You". I think this would have been during the Republican period, though before or after the reforms of Marius I'm not sure.

Has anyone come across something like this? Would love to get some input. :)

@Justin Swanton - something up your street?
 
A quick search on that there internet threw up this forum thread
 
Accompanied by foot stomping, that cadence would be quite intimidating to anyone being marched upon.

As a sustainable marching cadence, however, all of that foot stomping may be inefficient in conserving the soldiers' energy.

The question also arises: what does the soldier do with his foot during the pause on the fourth beat? A little toe tap? A sashay and a grimace?
 
The Roman Army certainly used marching songs, although none have survived. One song that did survive is (allegedly) a humorous song written by Julius Caesars troops for his triumph, telling the Citizens to fund his further s*x**l adventures - Legio XIIII use it as a marching-song, largely because very few people understand the Latin original (marching-songs - like orders - are rendered in Latin).
 
Im pretty sure that Romans would have had drummers and/or other musicians to help keep the beat of march. Not only to keep the correct pace, but also to stop one cohort from crashing into the back of another moving at a slower pace.

And although there would have been standard marching songs, I'm sure that the legionaries would gave come up with their own lewd versions to tramp along to.
 
Accompanied by foot stomping, that cadence would be quite intimidating to anyone being marched upon.

As a sustainable marching cadence, however, all of that foot stomping may be inefficient in conserving the soldiers' energy.

The question also arises: what does the soldier do with his foot during the pause on the fourth beat? A little toe tap? A sashay and a grimace?
I was wondering if it might be something reserved for a direct formation march on enemy troops. Although the fourth beat is silent, it doesn't mean no movement can take place. Creating the sound using stomping feet doesn't sound practical, but banging the gladius against the shield in rhythm I thought might be very effective at being intimidating.
 

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