My thoughts about Kindle and e Books

I just downloaded an upgrade for it. I've had it a few years, its a Kobo Touch C. My other reader is a Sony PRS300. Its very old (sony no longer make readers) but it still works. It just lacks internet and touch screen
Kobo Touch circa 2011-15 is no longer manufactured. That's pretty old for an ereader. However, I've kept a saddle on my Kobo Clara HD for over 6 years and ridden it hard. I do turn wifi off when not needed and purge my library regularly either by deleting books or moving them to my PC and, of course, install all the updates.
 
How many books do you have stored on it? I suspect the more memory is used, the slower it gets with operating. You may try to dump some of the read e-books first before buying something new.
Not that many to be honest, but I don't think that's the problem. I just thought all ereaders were slow. Then I tried a Kindle paperwhite in a big store a while ago and was impressed!
 
My new novel is being released in a couple of weeks, in print. I am debating whether to try and format it as an eBook?
I read that the sales ratio is about 4 paperbacks to 1 eBook.

Apparently people have a lot of trouble converting their print format files into eBook.
Youtubes vary wildly from 'Piece of Cake' to "Bucket of unexpected woes."
Could the team let me know how that process went for them?
 
My new novel is being released in a couple of weeks, in print. I am debating whether to try and format it as an eBook?
I read that the sales ratio is about 4 paperbacks to 1 eBook.

Apparently people have a lot of trouble converting their print format files into eBook.
Youtubes vary wildly from 'Piece of Cake' to "Bucket of unexpected woes."
Could the team let me know how that process went for them?

The compatibility issue must hinder things a big.:unsure:
 
I read that the sales ratio is about 4 paperbacks to 1 eBook.
But is that mass market paperbacks or trade? Because most (all?) self-publishing platforms seem to only offer the more expensive trade paperbacks, and I am guessing the ratio there favors ebooks.

Also, if you find it difficult to reformat from the file for the paperback, you might start from your original working manuscript (if you still have it), as I understand that formatting a Word doc (or similar) for an ebook is comparatively easy.

I say this, though I have never done either of these myself without considerable assistance from more competent friends and am totally intimidated at the thought of doing it myself. Still it's the received wisdom that doc to ebook isn't very challenging. Many members here have done it, and perhaps one of them will weigh in.
 
There's something about the tactile experience of physical books that digital formats can't replicate.
 
There's something about the tactile experience of physical books that digital formats can't replicate.
Yes, people keep saying that, and I don't dispute it, but I do wonder just how far into reading the book those sensations last.

For me, I love printed books. I like owning them, I like seeing them on my shelf, so that I've kept a great many of them even though my eyesight is no longer good enough to read them for any length of time without inducing eyestrain and a headache (even with reading glasses, which was a huge disappointment). So, yes, I am as sentimental about physical books as anyone.

On the other hand, while I may enjoy the tactile and sensory experience of opening a printed book and starting to read, if the writing is any good at all then within a page or so I am totally absorbed in the words and the story and I couldn't be less aware whether I am holding a printed book or an electronic device.

I read to be whisked away to another place, to experience sights, thoughts, emotions and much more besides, things that I might otherwise never be able to experience. To me, that's much more important than the sensations associated with holding a printed book.
 
Yes, people keep saying that, and I don't dispute it, but I do wonder just how far into reading the book those sensations last.

For me, I love printed books. I like owning them, I like seeing them on my shelf, so that I've kept a great many of them even though my eyesight is no longer good enough to read them for any length of time without inducing eyestrain and a headache (even with reading glasses, which was a huge disappointment). So, yes, I am as sentimental about physical books as anyone.

On the other hand, while I may enjoy the tactile and sensory experience of opening a printed book and starting to read, if the writing is any good at all then within a page or so I am totally absorbed in the words and the story and I couldn't be less aware whether I am holding a printed book or an electronic device.

I read to be whisked away to another place, to experience sights, thoughts, emotions and much more besides, things that I might otherwise never be able to experience. To me, that's much more important than the sensations associated with holding a printed book.

Not sentimentality, rather for information retention both in fiction and non-fiction literature:

This goes for the average reader, though I know eyesight can make print difficult to work with.



 
I remember a couple of days back, when this site went down.
I thought, then:
In the near future Montag won't need a flamethrower. When paper is gone your access to books will be entirely under corporate control. It can be simply turned off, or worse than that, filtered, and you will be helpless to stop that.
 
Worse, there are already countries right now where access to books and information is entirely under centralized government control.

And countries have tried to do it even before the digital age, Glavlit in the USSR, for example.
 
There's something about the tactile experience of physical books that digital formats can't replicate.

Yes, no one is disputing that. But I don't read because of said tactile experience. Nor do I see it as an essential element of the reading experience.

However, the ease with which you can handle your e-reader - containing dozens if not hundreds of books - being thinner and less hefty than many a paperback, has scalable fonts and backlight, doesn't only make it a perfect travel-companion, but also makes me often (not exclusively) using it while sitting in my 'study' surrounded by hundreds of paper-books.
Besides, I can read a new book minutes after ordering it. I don't have to leave the house or wait days for its delivery.

I remember a couple of days back, when this site went down.
I thought, then:
In the near future Montag won't need a flamethrower. When paper is gone your access to books will be entirely under corporate control. It can be simply turned off, or worse than that, filtered, and you will be helpless to stop that.

For this reason I make backup copies. Now, I happen to live in a country where it is officially allowed to make backup copies, as long as it is for personal use. But I would do it, even if I wasn't. It shouldn't make a difference whether I bought a paper or an e-book. The idea of 'buying a license to read a book' is something that makes my blood boil. Being dependent on any company (possibly even worse than Amazon) for the maintaining and keeping of your purchases/data is a really bad idea.
On that note, I also never use the cloud for whatever program or backup. Or Microsoft's Windows, that requires an account for you to access your own devices and, consequently, your data. You don't know if the site will remain online. The Internet can go down, the company can go bankrupt or just drop a service. There are no guarantees whatsoever, certainly not in times of conflict.
 
Yes, no one is disputing that. But I don't read because of said tactile experience. Nor do I see it as an essential element of the reading experience.

However, the ease with which you can handle your e-reader - containing dozens if not hundreds of books - being thinner and less hefty than many a paperback, has scalable fonts and backlight, doesn't only make it a perfect travel-companion, but also makes me often (not exclusively) using it while sitting in my 'study' surrounded by hundreds of paper-books.
Besides, I can read a new book minutes after ordering it. I don't have to leave the house or wait days for its delivery.



For this reason I make backup copies. Now, I happen to live in a country where it is officially allowed to make backup copies, as long as it is for personal use. But I would do it, even if I wasn't. It shouldn't make a difference whether I bought a paper or an e-book. The idea of 'buying a license to read a book' is something that makes my blood boil. Being dependent on any company (possibly even worse than Amazon) for the maintaining and keeping of your purchases/data is a really bad idea.
On that note, I also never use the cloud for whatever program or backup. Or Microsoft's Windows, that requires an account for you to access your own devices and, consequently, your data. You don't know if the site will remain online. The Internet can go down, the company can go bankrupt or just drop a service. There are no guarantees whatsoever, certainly not in times of conflict.

Convenience is sometimes a factor, but physical print books are better for memory retention.
 
Convenience is sometimes a factor, but physical print books are better for memory retention.
Convenience is always a factor. But then, I am not a student. I read to entertain myself. And if I forgot what I read, so much the better; I'll read it again. ;)

Having read the articles you linked to, I wonder whether they have accounted for differences in reading from a PC-screen, laptop or smartphone vs reading on a dedicated e-reader. E-readers have a different type of screen (no glare or reflections -> so easier for the eye) nor can you be as easily be distracted by social media running on the same device. Getting distracted by social-media is an entirely different issue, btw. It hugely depends on the person receptive to its pings and beeps, not the means or medium used for reading. But using one and the same device for both learning and social media is begging for distractions and loss of concentration.
I don't read much myself on my PC-screen. I can only agree it isn't fit for long pieces of text. Not to mention the tiny screen of a smartphone, you keep scrolling (too far or not enough), even with its font set to a small (hardly legible) font. Wholly unfit medium for that. But go tell the youngsters that.
I still read the paper issue of the newspaper, because I dislike reading articles on the PC. But I don't have any problems with an e-reader. I can read the whole day. And, if the book is any good, completely forget the world around me.
 
I still read the paper issue of the newspaper, because I dislike reading articles on the PC. But I don't have any problems with an e-reader. I can read the whole day.
I agree with this, and I would like to add that I love reading the newspaper on my tablet. I feel that the screen is the right size. My eyes don't get tired, and most importantly, I don't have deal with the unwieldiness of sheets of very thin too flexible paper. My problems are (1) the paper wants to fold in the wrong place, or even more frustrating the sun shines through the paper and makes it very hard to read.
 
Convenience is sometimes a factor, but physical print books are better for memory retention.
This is a generalisation. It may depend how one reads. It makes no difference to me as far as I can tell.
 
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This is a generalisation. It may depend how one reads. It makes no difference to me as far as I can tell.
Based on statistics, for the general reader information retention is improved while using physical print materials.
 

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