Quick question on titles

Toby Frost

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I'm currently re-editing a manuscript that I wrote a long time ago. It contains a character called Sir Francis Vale. Characters also refer to him as "Lord Vale". This seems wrong to me, as it ought to be "Sir Francis". Is there some exception that I've forgotten about?

Thanks!
 

The Judge

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It is actually possible for someone to be both a baronet and a lord -- I looked it up a few years back, but I can't now recall who it was, and I think it's rare. But my understanding is the higher title always wins, in which case he'd be known as Lord Vale.

If he's only a baronet or a knight, ie nothing higher, then it's Sir Francis, not Lord Vale. (And if he's married his wife is Lady Vale, not eg Lady Mary Vale, though if need be to avoid confusion with a daughter-in-law, she'd then be Mary, Lady Vale or Dowager Lady Vale.)
 

paranoid marvin

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If its fantasy then of course you can have what you like. Although to make it more relatable/understandable, 'Sir' is usually first name, 'Lord' surname and 'Earl/Duke the area you are earl or duke of.

So in my opinion you could have Sir Francis Vale, or Sir Fracis; but not Sir Vale.

I would imagine that the would be for practical reasons as much as anything. There could be several people with the same surname who are knighted, but there is only one Earl/Duke/King of a particular place.
 

sknox

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Of course, those rules apply to Britain. Other conventions are followed in Spain or Hungary or Sweden or whatever. And in America it's "hey you, bub."
 

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