Distances in The Lord of the Rings

Extollager

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I know that one could try to work out distances oneself, using the maps, but I'm lazy enough to wonder if somewhere there is a source or calculator for distances in Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age. Help?

I'm reading Holly Ordway's Tolkien's Faith, published this month (it is superb). She points out that during the Great War, the front in France was only 70 miles from some point in England and the guns could be heard in Sussex and Kent. This reminded me of how the distances in Middle-earth have not seemed to be very great to me, a resident of the United States in which some locales are very far indeed from each other (e.g. Alaska to Florida, to take an extreme example).

So I would be interested if there is a handy place for checking, say, how far the Tower Hills were from Rivendell or how far the Shire was from Mordor and so on.
 
I'm reading Holly Ordway's Tolkien's Faith, published this month (it is superb).
I've yet to find a book that details his relationship with Roman Catholicism to my satisfaction. How do you find Holly Ordway on this?
 
Ordway is magnificent. Without wallowing in chunks of exposition, she does evoke a Roman Catholicism in England of 120 years ago that seems very distant (so far as I, a Lutheran) can tell, from what prevails in Catholic parishes now. She doesn't hide her Catholicism but she does not use Tolkien's story in order to propagandize for her church, at least I don't feel she is trying to get at me. The book is certainly a major contribution to Tolkien studies.
 
Ordway is magnificent. Without wallowing in chunks of exposition, she does evoke a Roman Catholicism in England of 120 years ago that seems very distant (so far as I, a Lutheran) can tell, from what prevails in Catholic parishes now. She doesn't hide her Catholicism but she does not use Tolkien's story in order to propagandize for her church, at least I don't feel she is trying to get at me. The book is certainly a major contribution to Tolkien studies.
Many thanks. I look forward to reading it before too long.
 
I cannot vouch for its accuracy, but 'Journeys of Frodo' by Barbara Strachey is a set of simple to read maps alongside a brief description of the events taking place. A good companion to have alongside you when reading the novel of LOTR.

I also have another book called 'The Atlas of Tolkien's Middle-earth' by Karen Wynn Fonstad. Admittedly I've owned this book for a number of years, and it is still in my 'to be read' pile. A brief flick through shows it to be much more text orientated, and a more in depth look at Middle-earth, rather than the details of what happens in the books.
 
Ordway is magnificent. Without wallowing in chunks of exposition, she does evoke a Roman Catholicism in England of 120 years ago that seems very distant (so far as I, a Lutheran) can tell, from what prevails in Catholic parishes now. She doesn't hide her Catholicism but she does not use Tolkien's story in order to propagandize for her church, at least I don't feel she is trying to get at me. The book is certainly a major contribution to Tolkien studies.

Truly wonderful. Many many thanks for the recommendation.

I made some comments in the March 2024 reading thread:

 

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