Super writing prompt: Quantum Tardigrade: Scientists observe quantum entanglement in a multicellular living creature for the first time

Snicklefritz

Well-Known Member
Supporter
Joined
Feb 3, 2023
Messages
211
Location
Pennsylvania, USA

Pyan

Lex, ordo et ovum durum coctum
Staff member
Supporter
Joined
Jul 29, 2005
Messages
11,655
Location
Hampshire
I recognise every word in that title, without understanding in the slightest what they mean put together in that order.
 

Elentarri

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 23, 2022
Messages
388
I recognise every word in that title, without understanding in the slightest what they mean put together in that order.
Me too. Quantum anything makes my head hurt. It's like Star Trek physics. You just go with it.

I'm too afraid to look at the article in case the entangled tardigrade comes with a mycelium network.:whistle:
 

hitmouse

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 3, 2011
Messages
3,829
Previously many believed that quantum effects were not compatible with living beings, which were seen as being too ‘hot and wet’ to allow these states.

Since quantum effects are a fundamental property of everything, the “many” who apparently believe that are silly or ignorant or made up by a cheap journalist. The problem is with the observation of quantum effects in the conditions found in most living beings, not whether they are there or not.
 

Snicklefritz

Well-Known Member
Supporter
Joined
Feb 3, 2023
Messages
211
Location
Pennsylvania, USA
Previously many believed that quantum effects were not compatible with living beings, which were seen as being too ‘hot and wet’ to allow these states.

Since quantum effects are a fundamental property of everything, the “many” who apparently believe that are silly or ignorant or made up by a cheap journalist. The problem is with the observation of quantum effects in the conditions found in most living beings, not whether they are there or not.
Methinks perhaps you over simplify. See for instance

Quantum physics meets biology​

Markus Arndt,1 Thomas Juffmann,1 and Vlatko Vedral2,3

The argument/investigation has been ongoing since the early 1930's Schrödinger, Bohr, et al.

The origins of quantum biology​

Johnjoe McFadden
and
Jim Al-Khalili
Published:12 December 2018https://doi.org/10.1098/rspa.2018.0674

Certainly more than the musings of a "cheap journalist."
 

hitmouse

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 3, 2011
Messages
3,829
Thanks. I read the McFadden & Al-Khalili paper when it was originally published. It is a good summary, and I do not think it contradicts my point: the discussion is about the significance of quantum effects in macroscopic living systems at normal temperatures, not whether these effects exist or not in such conditions. The article misrepresents that point.
 

SRDFrench

Member
Joined
Nov 4, 2021
Messages
11
Coming to this late but the original paper about the quantum tardigrade (!) has been pretty much comprehensively dismissed - see: Peers dispute claim that tardigrades were entangled with qubits

The problem lies in distinguishing quantum entanglement from non-quantum forms of coupling & the authors didn't do that (at least not clearly enough). However, they did show that tardigrades are hardy little so-and-sos! (hardy tardies ...)
 

Snicklefritz

Well-Known Member
Supporter
Joined
Feb 3, 2023
Messages
211
Location
Pennsylvania, USA
Methinks perhaps you over simplify. See for instance

Quantum physics meets biology​

Markus Arndt,1 Thomas Juffmann,1 and Vlatko Vedral2,3

The argument/investigation has been ongoing since the early 1930's Schrödinger, Bohr, et al.

The origins of quantum biology​

Johnjoe McFadden
and
Jim Al-Khalili
Published:12 December 2018https://doi.org/10.1098/rspa.2018.0674

Certainly more than the musings of a "cheap journalist."

Coming to this late but the original paper about the quantum tardigrade (!) has been pretty much comprehensively dismissed - see: Peers dispute claim that tardigrades were entangled with qubits

The problem lies in distinguishing quantum entanglement from non-quantum forms of coupling & the authors didn't do that (at least not clearly enough). However, they did show that tardigrades are hardy little so-and-sos! (hardy tardies ...)
I must admit I'm "entangled" in this mostly as a fan of the tardigrade.

If I were a tardigrade I'd move out from home
Why live in the shrubbery when you could have a throne?
Pressure wouldn't squash me and fire couldn't burn
These are the things that I never will learn

I live in the shrubbery, for that's all I crave
I don't want these excitements to see me to my grave
I can live life in vacuums for years with no drink
And put up with hardships more than you can think

If I shed all my liquid and let myself dry out
I'll shrivel and sleep for some 15-odd years
I'd wake up, come water, and get on with living
With time in my pocket to pass by the day
 

Similar threads


Top