What is a booby trapped sandwich (Scottish slang?)

Danny McG

"I'd buy that for a dollar"
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I'm reading 22 dead little bodies (a Scottish crime thriller) by Stuart Macbride.
I'm wondering about this item:-

Stoney eased into the room, a folder balanced on the palm of one hand acting as a tray for a mound of tinfoil-wrapped packages. ‘Three bacon, one sausage, and one booby-trapped. Get them while they’re hot.’
The rest of the team swarmed him, snatching up their butties, then retreating to their seats to unwrap them.
 
I'd guess that its something less desirable than bacon or sausage. So cheese perhaps. Or in my case it would have to be peanut butter.

A bit like 'Revels' and the feeling when you picked a coffee one.

I don't think it's Scottish slang - not something I've really come across. If it were truly Scottish, all butties would be rolls with square sausage and bacon. None of this veggie cr*p ;)
 
Yeah, I think the booby-trapped just indicates there's one that might have something not normal in it (probably veggie, I'd guess) but butties are used in both Scotland and Ireland for the equivalent of rolls elsewhere. (We use bap, too). But don't the English talk about bacon butties, too?
 
Yeah, I think the booby-trapped just indicates there's one that might have something not normal in it (probably veggie, I'd guess) but butties are used in both Scotland and Ireland for the equivalent of rolls elsewhere. (We use bap, too). But don't the English talk about bacon butties, too?
Yes, I think buttie is universal for a substantial sanwich, most often a bacon buttie, hopefully with fried onions and a lashig of ketchup.

Baps are usually sandwiches made with floury white rolls.
 
With booby trapped, my completely ignorant guess would be one that is going to fall apart on you - or as was said earlier cheese or something else that would be a really hot, runny filling in a toasted sandwich.
 
It’s not in my Scots thesaurus
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Going out on a limb, and seeing as the ingredients of the other sandwiches are sausages and bacon, maybe a (kind of) 'booby-shaped' fried egg?
 
Someone once threw a sandwich at me from a moving car.
I can't remember the type other than it had mustard (had a really good look at it since it splattered all over my brand new t-shirt).
They obviously thought I was a booby they could trap with their sandwich.
A month later I was walking a street and some teen hooligans were shouting at me from their car.
Remembering the sandwich, I showed them a finger and cursed them loudly.
They drove on and parked up the street. I thought to myself, "huh, how convenient for them to live so close by" and took my usual shortcut home.
Only later did I realize they were probably waiting for me to pass by.

All that drama because of a sandwich.
 
I agree with @KiraAnn and @Valtharius if it's not an obvious Scottish slang, the well known American one is likely what's at play. But for me a booby trap doesn't have to include a bomb of some sort it's a trap for a clueless person, hence a booby.
 
'Butties' doesn't sound at all Scotish to me. A 'bacon buttie' round here (West Coast) would be be 'a roll and bacon', a sausage sandwich 'a roll and sausage' etc.

If the sandwich contains cheese or jam or somesuch (made with sliced bread) it would be a 'jam piece', 'cheese piece', etc.
 
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No butties there, but here’s summat else
 
I am assuming that it is used to describe any sandwich with salad in it. :ROFLMAO:
 
sandwich with salad

salad? In a roll? Never heard of such a thing :ROFLMAO:

The closest vegetable thing you'll get in a roll might be chips. Bit fat, nicely deep fat-fried ones. With brown sauce for me. A nice carb hit :giggle:

I've heard also of people putting crisps in their too, which is kinda similar.
 

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