Star Wars: An immersive and sophisticated movie experience

Rodders

|-O-| (-O-) |-O-|
Supporter
Joined
Nov 6, 2008
Messages
6,891
I’m sure that in the first episode of the Mandalorian that Grogu was referred to as a “Foundling”, or something very similar.
 

paeng

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 22, 2019
Messages
355
Early reviews of the first few movies state that they are the equivalent of Saturday matinee Republic serials, and they likely are as Lucas wanted to remake Flash Gordon. This is also seen in allusions to movies like the one just mentioned, various westerns, pirate flicks, and even war movies like Dam Busters:



However, he also borrowed from what he saw in film school, like Kurosawa's works. That plus what he read from Campbell allowed him to make his own stories, but what made them immersive and sophisticated are the special effects, which is what I remember impressed not only kids but even older audiences.

In time, viewers got used to them, so he tried to make stories more sophisticated by bringing in political intrigue in the prequels, but it didn't work.

Finally, we have the sequels, which essentially borrow from the earlier films and cram in more spectacle.
 

Swank

and debonair
Joined
Feb 25, 2022
Messages
1,847
Another fascinating departure from previous filmmaking is the way language is handled in SW. While all internally consistent, there is no one rule for language. Han and Chewie can understand each other without either being able to vocalize the other's language. Yoda is not human but speaks English with modified grammar. Protocol droids are translators for everything. Astromechs require droids to translate, but understand English - and can text through a spaceship. Some aliens speak their own tongue, but use English proper names.

Once again, SW sells us a complex and weird reality that make sense because it isn't logical - just like real life. It isn't modeled on anything previously seen.
 

Phyrebrat

www.beanwriting.com
Supporter
Joined
Feb 13, 2011
Messages
5,948
Location
In your bedroom wardrobe...
In the interest of maintaining the standard of nitpicking we've come to love in Star Wars discussions: you do know you can get white claret?
I should coco! If I’d’ve wanted such a bland image, I’d have used Chablis.

@Swank i was always fascinated by Han’s use of ‘Hell’ in ESB (‘Then I’ll see you in Hell!’) when going out of Echo Base to look for Luke.
 

Swank

and debonair
Joined
Feb 25, 2022
Messages
1,847
@Swank i was always fascinated by Han’s use of ‘Hell’ in ESB (‘Then I’ll see you in Hell!’) when going out of Echo Base to look for Luke.
Because it reflects a seemingly earthly connection to spirituality, or because it stands out as a swear? SW uses "damn" twice, which is interesting because that's what gets you sent to hell.

I think the idea of a place of punishment is somewhat universal and likely to make its way into any human language. Hell and damn occupy a similar linguistic space: Not quite a swear, but certainly a curse word.

Given the context, what else could Han have said to reflect his frustration at having to take a suicidal solo action because no one else will help him locate the hero of Yavin? Anything else would be uncharacteristic kvetching, lecturing or threatening. SW characters talk to each other - they don't muse to themselves.


I’d have used Chablis.
We all should use Chablis. It's the embodiment of classy beverage.
 

Phyrebrat

www.beanwriting.com
Supporter
Joined
Feb 13, 2011
Messages
5,948
Location
In your bedroom wardrobe...
Because it reflects a seemingly earthly connection to spirituality

Yes, because of its connection to Abrahamic religions which seems so Earthly to me. Grand Moff Tarkin's board meeting on using the DS has that horrible officer referring to Force users as cleaving to an outdated religion. Not that there can be only one religion in SW universe, but it just didn't seem congruent to my six year old's brain.

I won't turn my nose up at a Chablis!
 

Swank

and debonair
Joined
Feb 25, 2022
Messages
1,847
Yes, because of its connection to Abrahamic religions which seems so Earthly to me. Grand Moff Tarkin's board meeting on using the DS has that horrible officer referring to Force users as cleaving to an outdated religion. Not that there can be only one religion in SW universe, but it just didn't seem congruent to my six year old's brain.

I won't turn my nose up at a Chablis!
I think hell as a concept is also used in other non-Abrahamic religions, was well as more loosely used as a term for the underworld of the dead. In context "Then I'll see you in hell" seems to imply more about death than punishment.

I take all of Star Wars as having whatever the common human tongue is as being translated into English for easy viewing. So "hell" is more of a rough translation than an English vocabulary word. (To me.)

The religion line is actually telling: Along with things Han says, it leads the viewer to presume that Ben and Vader might be cultists and sow doubt in the audience's minds about what Ben is telling Luke. Subsequent events demonstrate that the Force is not some sort of faith, but a demonstrable technology that some people can access to perform actions that normally require machinery.


An interesting side story to the SW universe would be an exploration of what the Force actually is, who made it, how it works, how it got lost and how it was created. The fact that the Jedi/Sith characters can access something that we don't have on earth today suggests that the Force is something that was created in our future or that human beings were given access to in the future. It also appears that the people using the Force understand many of its rules and procedures, but not what it actually is or the principles of how it works. Like cavemen effectively using some radios they found.
 

paeng

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 22, 2019
Messages
355
From "‘Star Wars’: George Lucas Once Admitted That He Can’t Write Dialogue":

“Most people don’t understand the style of Star Wars. They don’t get that there’s an underlying motif that is very much like a 1930s Western or Saturday matinee serial. It’s in the more romantic period of making movies and adventure films. And this film is even more of a melodrama than the others,” he continued.

From "Did Alec Guinness Really Hate 'Star Wars'?"
Sir Guinness did not hate Star Wars for what he thought it was, an innocent film for all audiences that should not be given further attention, he grew to think negatively of his experience in the franchise because of the hectic fan reaction and his earlier career being forgotten in the history books in order to highlight his personification as old Ben Kenobi.
 

Top