Parallel development of humans

Robert Zwilling

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Early human fossils, Australopithecus africanus, originally dated at 2.6 million years old, are now thought to be a million years older than originally thought. This puts them in nearly the same time frame, 3.2 million years ago, as Lucy, whose species, Australopithecus afarensis, is considered to be the forerunner of early humans. The earlier dating for Australopithecus africanus, brings up the possibility that the two species interacted with each. According to the article, instead of single evolutionary lines like a tree, it looks more like multiple branches, like in a bush, came together to bring about modern humans.

The fossil age was determined by checking the date of the sediment the fossils were in. That dated to around 3.4 to 3.7 million years. The article didn't say why the fossils needed to be redated a different way.
 

Bramandin

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I'm not really intelligent enough to understand it, but considering that human species migrated in waves, it makes sense that the species interbred for as long as they were able until one species became dominant.
 

LostCosmonaut

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Isn't there a theory that Neanderthals didn't really die out, but were absorbed into the more numerous human population? I could definitely envision a more complex interaction of evolutionary lineages.
 

BAYLOR

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Isn't there a theory that Neanderthals didn't really die out, but were absorbed into the more numerous human population? I could definitely envision a more complex interaction of evolutionary lineages.

About 4 percent of modern human DNA of Northern European decent is from Neanderthals.

They were stockier and shorter than us but possessed twice the physical strength and had larger brain than modern Humans.
 

mosaix

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I'm not really intelligent enough to understand it, but considering that human species migrated in waves, it makes sense that the species interbred for as long as they were able until one species became dominant.

In theory interbreeding of species leads to a new species. There's a little bit of Neanderthal in us all.

The Normans invaded England in 1066. There's talk of English and Normans in the battle and then, gradually talk of Normans dies out and we continue to talk of English only. But the Normans never went away. I suppose there's a bit of Norman in most English people.
 

Robert Zwilling

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In the modern human gene pool there is both Neanderthal and Denisovan DNA. So far there are also lesser traces of 2 other hominins.
 

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