June 2022 Reading Thread

Danny McG

And so it goes
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I've moved on to a book that I feared had a real possibility of being a all time clunker. Starship for Sale by M.R. Forbes
I've got the (so far) three books in the series but I've only read the first one.
I can't remember why I left the other 2 but now my memory has been jogged I think I'll peruse them.

There's just so many books coming out recently - I could happily sit and read for like 16 hours a day, but I get nagged after about three.
 

Stomalomalus

Writer to Marketer and back to writer again
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I’ve finished A Line to Kill by Anthony Horowitz, not my usual fare. Was good. Ish. Fast paced, enjoyable light reading. Nice short chapters so it was easy to stop reading. Very different from what I generally like as I don’t think I’ll be thinking much about this book now it’s finished.
 

dask

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JusticeAtNuremberg.jpg

Conot's doing a pretty good job so far.
 

Parson

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Finished Starship for Sale by M.R. Forbes. This book was a surprise from one end to the beginning. I had very low expectations when I discovered the time line was essentially the present. But in spite of the hooky idea and one of the characters (the man selling the starship is one of the more aggravating characters in literature) I found I liked it a lot. There is quite a surprising amount of reflection on what it means to take deadly action. There are a couple of not humanoid aliens, who are key to the story and I'm off to read Head Case book 2, But .... the first character met in this book is the aggravating salesman, in a way that makes it seem like he's going to be a feature of at least this book. SIGH! More later.
 

Hugh

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Arthur C. Clarke "A Fall of Moondust"

I thought this was going to be truly dull - tourist ship gets immersed in dust in lunar sea and needs to be found/rescued - yawn - but it held my attention really well and leaves me with a lot of respect for Clarke as both writer and scientist.
 

tobl

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Arthur C. Clarke "A Fall of Moondust"

I thought this was going to be truly dull - tourist ship gets immersed in dust in lunar sea and needs to be found/rescued - yawn - but it held my attention really well and leaves me with a lot of respect for Clarke as both writer and scientist.
it's actually a goood book. i think it was 2 volumes..
 

Spade

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I've struggled about halfway through a few books recently. The Echo Wife by Sarah Gailey, The Apollo Murders by Chris Hadfield, and Light Years From Home by Michael Chen. All suffer from glacial plots and unlikeable main characters. I really need to pick something that I'm going to be hooked on next.
 

Teresa Edgerton

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Recently read The Grief of Stones, by Katherine Addison (aka Sarah Monette), second book in the "Cemeteries of Amalo" series, which follow on Addison/Monette's Goblin Emperor.

This book started out rather slow, but after a few chapters the plot began to thicken and it became (at least for me) unputdownable.

Now I've started City of Stairs, by Robert Jackson Bennett.
 

Danny McG

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I'm starting a re-read of the Mortalis trilogy by David Morrell, I'm currently in the opening chapters of book 1, The Brotherhood of the Rose
 

Elentarri

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Finished: T. Rex and the Crater of Doom by Walter Álvarez.
Short little book

T. Rex and the Crater of Doom is a pulp fiction title that really doesn't fit with the nonfiction contents of the book. So if you are expecting dinosaurs, you will be disappointed. This is a book about a geology, astrology, physics and an ancient mystery that gets solved by a collection of scientists all working together.

The mystery to be solved is the cause of the mass extinction about 65 million years ago that exterminated the dinosaurs and a large portion of life on this planet. The story Alvarez tells is the description of the scientific investigations which led to the development of the impact hypothesis, the various bits of evidence to strengthen this hypothesis, and the subsequent search for the impact crater. I particularly enjoyed how Alvarez shows how science is supposed to work: by explaining how his ideas developed, how other scientists in different fields ended up involved and contributing to his project, their contributions (whether confirmations or poking holes in his ideas and methods), the blind-alleys, the disappointments and excitement, as well as additional work by other scientists to expand on the original hypothesis.

Walter Alvarez tells a compelling story about solving an ancient mystery, while also making complex scientific details accessible to the general public.

My only complaint is the lack of a map(s) to show the location of the "Crater of Doom" and other relevant sites.
 

Elentarri

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I'm currently reading Jacqueline du Pre, by Elizabeth Wilson.
Such a talented musician, could have been a singer or a pianist or a violin or viola player, however she chose the cello, because at the age of four she liked the sound of it.
I read a different biography, but it's rather crappy what happened to her in the end - and I don't just mean the MS.
 

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