May 2022 Reading Thread.

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Elentarri

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The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon. Written from the perspective of a 15 year old teenager with Asperger's or whatever label they have stuck on it these days (though the word is never mentioned in the novel), I found it cute, entertaining and eye-opening. I have no idea how accurate the portrayal of the main character is, but it's fiction and people are individuals, so this is how the brain of the kid in the book works. My foster brother with Asperger's has asked to read it when I'm done. Apparently the first 3 pages resonated with him.
 

AE35Unit

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Reading a story called A Planet Named Joe by S. A. Lombino, from Planet Stories 1952. The author was later known as Evan Hunter who became Ed McBain
IMG20220521150352-01_copy_768x893.jpeg
 

Rodders

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Sabbat Martr finished and a lot bloody better than I remember. Dan writes great fleet action well, too. while not a large part of this book, it was still very exciting.

Now on to Traitor General.

Book one of the Gaunts Ghosts ”The Lost” Omnibus. I remember this fondly and I’m very much looking forward to reading this.
 
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HareBrain

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A book and author I'd never heard of before, Merlin Dreams by Peter Dickinson, from 1988, which I found in a charity shop. This is quite a strange format -- it's a collection of Arthurian-style tales made up by Dickinson, linked by dreams experienced by Merlin after he's shut under his rock by Nimue. It's roughly A4 size and beautifully illustrated by Alan Lee.

It seems surprising I've never heard of Dickinson, as he's listed as having won a load of prizes for YA books. On the strength of this, I'm certainly going to look out some of his other stuff.
 

worldofmutes

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I’ve been contemplating Alastair Reynolds’ Absolution Gap. I don’t have time for anything so monstrous though.

I have a couple of days off and couldn’t decide what to read next. Recently I’ve read:

Junky by William S. Burroughs
Burnt Water by Carlos Fuentes
The Wine of Solitude by Irène Némirovsky.
And, Sexus by Henry Miller.

The next couple of books I’ll be reading will be
Salt Water by Josep Pla
Bacacay by Witold Gombrowicz

And, possibly,
Do You Dream of Terra-Two by Temi Oh.

I bring my books to work and try to maintain an introspective æsthetic. It’s very important.
 

Hugh

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William Dalrymple "City of Djinns: a Year in Delhi"
While I enjoyed it, it was also a disappointment in that I was hoping to read a book about a year in Delhi and a variety of interesting encounters and characters. It turns out that about two thirds, three quarters even, of the book is the history of Delhi artfully interwoven within a framework of one year. There are interesting encounters and it is very readable, just not what I hoping for.
 

Parson

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Finished Star Divide by Ken Lozito. Another satisfactory SF Space Opera in the Ascension Series. There are warning signs on the horizon about this series. The first is that the longer the story goes on, the larger and more important the role of the ESP. And even more worrying is the fact that the romance angle in the book continues to grow. I've downloaded the next book Star Alliance and intend to get on with it, but I am worried that the series is about to go in directions I have no interest in going. We'll have to wait and see.
 
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