Your single favorite illustration not by Tolkien of something in his works?

Extollager

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I suppose this is mine, Pauline Baynes’s design for the box of a British boxed set.
FBE39C3E-E08C-486F-94B3-553771F00049.jpeg
 
Before his music career, Jimmy Cauty (one half of The KLF) drew some posters, one of which was one of Athena’s best sellers for a while
As a kid, I both loved that and found it quite disturbing.

And honestly, could it *be* any more seventies?
 
Well I never knew that! I'd forgotten about the overlap between old techno and psychedelia, too. I really like Cauty's landscapes and architecture, although everyone looks as if they could do with a few days in bed.

I've always like the Alan Lee pictures, personally. The muted colours always seem right to me (likewise his covers for the Gormenghast trilogy).

1646130549966.png
 
As a kid, I both loved that and found it quite disturbing.

And honestly, could it *be* any more seventies?
The two archetypal 1970s posters: Cauty's LOTR, and the girl on the tennis court.
 
Well I never knew that! I'd forgotten about the overlap between old techno and psychedelia, too. I really like Cauty's landscapes and architecture, although everyone looks as if they could do with a few days in bed.

I've always like the Alan Lee pictures, personally. The muted colours always seem right to me (likewise his covers for the Gormenghast trilogy).

View attachment 87095


Yes, my LOTR and Hobbit books are both illustrated by Lee. Apart from Tolkien himself, I have seen nothing else as close to the author's written word.
 
Lee's use of white to highlight is interesting. Am I right in thinking that the mural in Rivendell in the film of The Fellowship of the Ring was by Lee?

I believe so. I know he was the lead artist for the movies and he more than Howe, portrayed the free people's cultures.
 
I don't know how common this book is, but it has two very different illustration styles within, both of which are well done:
dd-bestiary01.jpg

29e2fcb4-4137-11e6-90da-767ee1e59a0a.jpg


The cover and inside line drawings are in a style that might be construed as the decorative motif of Middle Earth, while the paintings are more realistic depictions of events.
 
The first (cover) drawing looks like the work of Ian Miller or Millar. He did the cover art for a reissue of Ballantine's paperback of Joy Chant's Red Moon and Black Mountain. (The first issue had art by Bob Pepper, which I much preferred.)

Pepper:
1653340203285.png


Miller:

1653340236016.png
 
I don't know how common this book is, but it has two very different illustration styles within, both of which are well done:
dd-bestiary01.jpg

29e2fcb4-4137-11e6-90da-767ee1e59a0a.jpg


The cover and inside line drawings are in a style that might be construed as the decorative motif of Middle Earth, while the paintings are more realistic depictions of events.
I've got that book, some great illustrations and as @Extollager says Ian Miller for the cover.
 
The first (cover) drawing looks like the work of Ian Miller or Millar. He did the cover art for a reissue of Ballantine's paperback of Joy Chant's Red Moon and Black Mountain. (The first issue had art by Bob Pepper, which I much preferred.)

Pepper:
View attachment 89861

Miller:

View attachment 89862
Apparently there are many artists who did the Bestiary:

"These illustrations are mostly by Ian Miller and Allan Curless; the others are by Michael Foreman, Lidia Postma, John Blanche, Pauline Martin, Victor Ambrus, Sue Porter, Jaroslav Bradac, Linda Garland, and John Davis."
 
I guess I'd have picked something from Alan Lee or John Howe, but since they were already mentioned I'll pick something slightly out of left field that a lot of people here might never have seen before... Those were the covers to a French edition (6 books!) done by one Philippe Munch, I believe:

LOTR Philippe Munch.jpg


I never read them but I easily spent hours looking at them, trying to guess how all these creatures and elements interacted with each other in the story. They were certainly wonderful to captivate the imagination of 10-year-old me. Book 3 may have been my favorite of the lot, although Frodo and his lightsaber on Book IV came close.
 

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