February 2022 Reading Thread

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The Judge

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So, as mentioned in the previous thread I'm half-way through Lost Acre by Andrew Caldecott and getting on well. For my separate bedtime reading I've got another hardback I picked up cheap, The First Sister by Linden A Lewis, which I know nothing about. (I really ought to check books out before buying them...)

What are you reading this month?
 
Still rereading The Will To Battle, book 3 of Ada Palmer's Terra Ignota, to get up-to-date before starting book 4 Perhaps The Stars.

Additionally I plan to start book 1 of The Dream of the Red Chamber, an 18th century Chinese classic by Cao Xueqin. Never heard of the guy, but his novels (only about 2500 pages) are praised all around. Also the Dutch translation (which took 3 translators 12 years to complete) was recently published. So, in a twist of my sobriety, I bought the set.
Will I regret the purchase? Only time (2500 pages) will tell.
 
Finished Ravencry by Ed McDonald, second book in the "Raven's Mark" trilogy - technically just under the wire last night before midnight so consider this a January update for all intents and purposes.

I enjoyed the first book, this sequel was much the same. Second-world fantasy, some magical tech but not steampunky. Single POV, grim atmosphere, the hero outnumbered and embattled. Plot-wise it went in a couple of unexpected directions. I will read the final book in the series but need a break from the misery (ha) for now.

Not sure what I'll read next.
 
As someone who grew up reading Golden Era genre fictions, that is some impressive line-up, those four consecutive posts - Tolkien to Andre Norton to Lester Del Rey to Fritz Leiber! Does my heart good to see these authors still being read. :)

(Also, to the other posters, forgive me if your own authors are Golden Era - I didn't know them; Cao Xueqin is perhaps from another region's Golden Era...)
 
I'm still plugging away at Golden Age Detective Stories ed. Otto Penzler. A different Golden Age, though there's some overlap. :)
 
Ah, wish I'd have said 'age' instead of 'era'... mind isn't functioning right now.

I am about to start - on Audible - Reprieve, by James Han Mattson, which is described as being: A chilling and blisteringly relevant literary novel of social horror.
 
Ah, wish I'd have said 'age' instead of 'era'... mind isn't functioning right now.

I am about to start - on Audible - Reprieve, by James Han Mattson, which is described as being: A chilling and blisteringly relevant literary novel of social horror.
That one looks very interesting. I'll be curious about your view of it.
 
Finished 'The Wizard Of Earthsea' and David Jason's autobiography 'Del Of A Life'

Just started Lord Dunsany's 'Time and The Gods'

David
 
The Godel Operation by James L. Cambias. As the blurb says, "a droid and his boy in the tenth millennium" go on a sort of quest through a solar system densely populated with biological and artificial intelligences in search of the legendary superweapon called the Godel Trigger. Good, fun stuff.

Incidentally, Cambias seems to be like Star Trek movies, except more so: I seem to read just the odd ones (since his second sounded like a sort of technothriller and his fourth was a fantasy). His first, A Darkling Sea, is a classic. The third, Arkad's World, was fine. This fifth one I'd put between them.
 
A techno thriller..
Screenshot_20220203-000733.jpg
 
The Godel Operation by James L. Cambias. As the blurb says, "a droid and his boy in the tenth millennium" go on a sort of quest through a solar system densely populated with biological and artificial intelligences in search of the legendary superweapon called the Godel Trigger. Good, fun stuff.

Incidentally, Cambias seems to be like Star Trek movies, except more so: I seem to read just the odd ones (since his second sounded like a sort of technothriller and his fourth was a fantasy). His first, A Darkling Sea, is a classic. The third, Arkad's World, was fine. This fifth one I'd put between them.
I've read some short work of his and writes quite well, so I've considered picking up his first novel in the past - though now I cannot find it available - and maybe trying this new one. Maybe I will now you've posted this positive review.
 
Oh, and I've now made a start on Mark Twain's Innocent's Abroad. This will be a slow read in between other things. Every time I pick up Twain, I'm delighted with what I read, and this is no exception.
 
William Gass - On Being Blue: A Philosophical Inquiry

“I am firmly of the opinion that people who can’t speak have nothing to say. It’s one thing we do to the poor, the deprived: cut out their tongues… allow them a language as lousy as their lives.”
 
I've read some short work of his and writes quite well, so I've considered picking up his first novel in the past - though now I cannot find it available - and maybe trying this new one. Maybe I will now you've posted this positive review.
Yeah, I can't recommend the first one strongly enough but I think you'd enjoy this latest one, too.
 
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