The Book of Boba Fett - Disney's Limited Series

ctg

weaver of the unseen
Supporter
Joined
Aug 21, 2007
Messages
9,269
The background info
A spinoff film featuring Boba Fett had been in development at Disney as far back as 2013, but then 2018's Solo: A Star Wars Story proved to be a box office disappointment for the studio. Disney's strategy shifted to spinoff series for its streaming platform, Disney+, beginning with The Mandalorian. That series was a commercial and critical success, winning over audiences with the relationship between Pedro Pascal's Mandalorian and the Child (aka Grogu, although some still think of him as Baby Yoda).

Boba Fett appeared briefly in the S1 episode, "The Gunslinger," along with Fennec, returning in S2 for a much larger role. In the finale, he played a pivotal role in rescuing Grogu from Moff Gideon, tricking the Imperials into allowing his cohorts to land in a cruiser's fighter launch tube. Fans went wild over Mark Hamill's surprise cameo as a (digitally de-aged) Luke Skywalker, who takes Grogu with him to complete his Jedi training. And there wasn't a dry eye in the house as Grogu and the Mandalorian made their farewells. The aforementioned post-credits scene showed Boba Fett and Fennec invading Jabba the Hutt's palace on Tatooine, which is pretty much where the new series picks up.

Favreau has said that The Book of Boba Fett takes place in the same timeline as The Mandalorian, jokingly dubbing it "The Mandalorian season 2.5." But other than that, the studio has been pretty mum about the details. Per the official premise:

The Book of Boba Fett, a thrilling Star Wars adventure teased in a surprise end-credit sequence following the Season 2 finale of The Mandalorian, finds legendary bounty hunter Boba Fett and mercenary Fennec Shand navigating the galaxy’s underworld when they return to the sands of Tatooine to stake their claim on the territory once ruled by Jabba the Hutt and his crime syndicate.

I have often asked where are the Hutts, because there are more of them just Jabba. He's dead, but others aren't and they have whole region of space named for them. If it's true that Bobba wants to take over the power vacuum then it's all good ... sort of.

He is one man, even if he has Fennec looking after his rear. The black market has always been a problem for the SW characters, but what if Bobba can turn it around?

I believe that Fett taking over part of the galactic underworld is going to provide rich stories that can also somewhat venture into the darker side.
 

BAYLOR

There Are Always new Things to Learn.
Joined
Jun 29, 2014
Messages
20,403
The background info


I have often asked where are the Hutts, because there are more of them just Jabba. He's dead, but others aren't and they have whole region of space named for them. If it's true that Bobba wants to take over the power vacuum then it's all good ... sort of.

He is one man, even if he has Fennec looking after his rear. The black market has always been a problem for the SW characters, but what if Bobba can turn it around?

I believe that Fett taking over part of the galactic underworld is going to provide rich stories that can also somewhat venture into the darker side.

It looks quite interesting.
 

ctg

weaver of the unseen
Supporter
Joined
Aug 21, 2007
Messages
9,269
It looks quite interesting.
It does, but is it interesting for the audience to explore the darker side of the usual business? I mean are you guys really ready to see all that the Underworld got up while Emperor was still in business, because it's going to be a wild ride and somewhat darker than anything we have seen so far.

The slave trade is just part of it. A big part because somehow slaving is main business in the SW universe and the Imperium was notorious for getting away with it. Then there is piracy and all the black market goodies, including weapons that Mando use, like for example his disrupter rifle. It is banned for a good reason. In other words war is a good business for the Underworld.

There are other trades, including chemicals and exotic animals/species. It is a big dark patch that some people might be uncomfortable to see. But it happens everyday in the SW universe.

Is Bobba going to be a boss or a warlord?
 
Last edited:

ctg

weaver of the unseen
Supporter
Joined
Aug 21, 2007
Messages
9,269
It might be hard for Star Wars fans to think of Boba Fett's armor as belonging to anyone but the most feared bounty hunter in a galaxy far, far away, but that wasn't always the intent. On Disney+ Day, Disney released a new documentary special titled Boba Fett: Under the Helmet. The documentary chronicles Boba Fett's creation, and the character's continued popularity among Star Wars fans well after the original Star Wars trilogy ended, leading towards the debut of The Book of Boba Fett in December. In the documentary, The Empire Strikes Back's art director Joe Johnston confirms that the design that would eventually belong to Boba Fett should have belonged to an army of what George Lucas called "super" Stormtroopers.

The plan was to make 100 such armors, but the film's budget ultimately didn't allow for it. Since they'd already made the first armor as a prototype, Lucas suggested using it for a bounty hunter character. Johnston darkened the previously white armor, and Boba Fett was born.

Also Favreau confirmed that it is about the power vacuum Jabba's demise has created in the Hutt Space.
"There is a power vacuum," executive producer Jon Favreau explained to Empire Magazine. "Because Jabba is gone. Jabba was clearly a very strong and imposing leader, who people were very scared of, and who seemed to rule with an iron fist. You pull somebody like that out of the ecosystem of Tatooine -- and Hutt Space in general -- and you have the opportunity that's ripe in the gangster genre."
 

ctg

weaver of the unseen
Supporter
Joined
Aug 21, 2007
Messages
9,269
"It's going to be really interesting to see how their dynamics grow in The Book of Boba Fett. I think that's all I can say. The rest is, you have to watch. Not that they're the bad guys. They're not that good either," Wen shared with Disney twenty-three magazine, per The Direct. "We are the anti-hero. I like playing an anti-hero. You get away with more, I think."

Detailing their partnership and their morals, Wen explained, "Well, there's a partnership between the two of them [Fennec and Boba Fett], for sure. They're bonded by the fact that they both lived through a near-death experience. And there is a sense of code that they both abide by."

Am I wrong in thinking that Boba is doing a con-job? He is not a Hutt, but he is exploiting that hole by doing a hostile boardroom takeover and in the aftermath he asserts dominance in the Hutt space by controlling Jabba's enterprise. In other words, he becomes a warlord, and then something else but he is not a boss. That is his problem. How to be Don?

If that is true then the tale is going to be interesting, because we could be see learning the trade and stumbling on his way to dominance. I just don't see that he could ever be a Kingpin or Capo di tutti capi. A warlord most definitely. The other ones need business head.
 

ctg

weaver of the unseen
Supporter
Joined
Aug 21, 2007
Messages
9,269
zisY3yVVQC4zKd7fSUJyUk-970-80.jpg.webp


Action figurines are already out and this time they're decent.
 

ctg

weaver of the unseen
Supporter
Joined
Aug 21, 2007
Messages
9,269

He's more like a boss, a bit clueless but full of determination on getting the job done. Also note that the Slave-1 has been renamed by Disney. On the new Lego set it's called simply, "Boba Fett's Starship," going against Marvel rebranding it as "Firespray."

Under the link, there are five teasers, named 1. "Reign," 2. "Message," 3. "The Return," 4. "Ready" and 5. "Authority"
 

ctg

weaver of the unseen
Supporter
Joined
Aug 21, 2007
Messages
9,269
Now midway through its seven-episode season culminating with "Chapter 7" on February 9, The Book of Boba Fett is potentially building towards a Mos Espa gang war as the criminal underworld fights for the empire of Jabba the Hutt — territory Fett and Shand say belongs to them.

"I really hope that they want to go back and see the whole thing over again in a different light after, you know, knowing how things have — I'm so careful with my words here, how things have evolved, and all these other elements that have come into play," Wen told RadioTimes.com. "You know, that's what's so great with [producers] Jon [Favreau] and Dave [Filioni]. They are so knowledgeable about this world, about Star Wars, and they're such huge fans that they know how to set up the pieces and make moves that you don't even know are coming."

Wen continued: "And then suddenly it's like [claps her hands together] ooh, checkmate. So yeah, we're waiting. We're waiting for that win. We're waiting for that hit. And not just 'til the very last episode, like each and every episode there's new moves and new elements that come into play that hopefully will surprise the fans. I know it surprised me."
 

The Crawling Chaos

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 26, 2014
Messages
342
I'm holding off until the last episode to share my complete thoughts on the show, but just to check in: I have been thoroughly unimpressed with it so far. As a kid I got into Star Wars for Luke Skywalker, but I stayed for Boba Fett. Ever since my father bought me the original Kenner action figure, which was before I even saw the movies he appeared in, I've only had eyes for Boba and his cool armor and gadgets.

Needless to say I have since somewhat grown up and made my peace with the fact that A/ I don't have to like every new thing that has the Star Wars stamp on it and B/ It's okay for Lucasfilm to try new things with established characters. So even though I was rather hopeful when I learned a Boba Fett series was being made, I endeavoured to approach this new material with a healthy amount of scepticism, ready to praise it for its qualities and criticize it for its shortcomings.

I'll be honest: I am struggling to find qualities at all. The show alternates between the unimpressive and the goofy. There is literally not a moment or scene I can think of that stood out in a positive way. It doesn't help that as far as I'm concerned, Robert Rodriguez is one of the most overrated filmmaker around.

As for this:
And then suddenly it's like [claps her hands together] ooh, checkmate. So yeah, we're waiting. We're waiting for that win. We're waiting for that hit.
It is my biggest gripe with Favreau's Star Wars shows. Every season starts with uninteresting filler episodes and ends with two satisfying ones. We should not have to wait for the end of a season to get that first A-ha moment.
 

soulsinging

the dude abides
Joined
Oct 23, 2008
Messages
2,486
It is my biggest gripe with Favreau's Star Wars shows. Every season starts with uninteresting filler episodes and ends with two satisfying ones. We should not have to wait for the end of a season to get that first A-ha moment.
This makes so much sense to me. I've said elsewhere I've grown weary of the clone/Mandalore focus, but gave Mandalorian a chance. After 3-4 episodes, I lost interest. I recently watched the episode with Ahsoka (end of season 2) because I'm intrigued by the upcoming series for her, and it was excellent. I also felt like I lost/missed nothing in the intervening dozen episodes.

The first BoBF episode was very unimpressive to me, so I'm going to sit this one out.

I'm still really looking forward to the Ahsoka and Obi-Wan series'. Here's hoping they fare better.
 

Dave

Non Bio
Staff member
Joined
Jan 5, 2001
Messages
21,698
Location
Way on Down South, London Town
The first BoBF episode was very unimpressive to me, so I'm going to sit this one out.
The general opinion (including mine) was that the second episode was much better, even very good, so you may want to watch it. Unfortunately, the third episode was pants and worse than the first. So, up to you if you want to watch it after that!
 

soulsinging

the dude abides
Joined
Oct 23, 2008
Messages
2,486
The general opinion (including mine) was that the second episode was much better, even very good, so you may want to watch it. Unfortunately, the third episode was pants and worse than the first. So, up to you if you want to watch it after that!
Well, I'm currently rewatching clone wars, and then want to take a pass at rebels (I've waited 25 years to see Thrawn), so I've got a little time to see if the show finds its legs before I'd get to watching it anyway.
 

ctg

weaver of the unseen
Supporter
Joined
Aug 21, 2007
Messages
9,269
It turns out the Tuskens are a complicated people. The native Tatooinians typified as evil savages in the early Star Wars films have been revealed to be so much more, thanks to TV series The Mandalorian and The Book of Boba Fett. While it’s both fantastic and necessary to see cultural depth given to an indigenous people, even a fictional one, this retcon is having one unfortunate side effect.

I speak, of course, of the scene in Attack of the Clones where Anakin discovers his mother Shmi has been captured by a tribe of Tuskens, finds her only to have her die in his arms, and then murders every single Tusken there. “I killed them, I killed them all. They’re dead. Every single one of them. But not just the men, but the women, and the children too,” he states to Padmé when he returns to his stepdad’s homestead.

Someone else felt the same way as we did.
 

Dave

Non Bio
Staff member
Joined
Jan 5, 2001
Messages
21,698
Location
Way on Down South, London Town
Is it a "retcon" to give them a "cultural depth"? Even the Nazis enjoyed Wagner and Arts & Crafts. No one is black or white; everyone must have a little good in them, even Anakin himself. :cautious:

I think the main real difference is seeing them now as a persecuted indigenous people. I don't see how that makes what Anakin did any worse. Put it this way, would it make it any better if the women and children were the wives and children of mindless killers? However, maybe that was only me. Maybe everyone else saw Star Wars (and I mean the original and best outing) and thought *the Sand People are animals to be shot like dogs.* Obi Wan Kenobi couldn't have lived among them with that attitude.

I also found this about something written in what he says is a "Canon book" which at least means that this idea is nothing new:

 

ctg

weaver of the unseen
Supporter
Joined
Aug 21, 2007
Messages
9,269
The idea is nothing new, it's the connection that people have made, just now, because we see things in different light. We have gone through BLM, racism highlighted, all sorts of things that have only put things in different light. So I'm kind of glad that people can recognise things even though its not the main item that Disney wanted to bring out. Maybe someone can make sand people over version of shindler's list or something.

Neverthless, it is still intriguing detail.
 

Top