January 2022 Reading Thread.

Status
Not open for further replies.

Dan Jones

Der Vater absurder Geschichten
Supporter
Joined
Nov 14, 2014
Messages
3,244
Location
I am here to do the thing!
Lots of reading happening at the moment. Still plodding on with Dune, but also reading The Promise by Damon Galgut, and re-reading Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons's Watchmen. I'm also skimming through Tade Thompson's Rosewater.

Doing the background research for Chronscast has grossly swollen my TBR pile, so I have a great deal to be getting on with!
 

Fiberglass Cyborg

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 13, 2021
Messages
334
Re-reading "The Bands of Mourning" by Brandon Sanderson yet again, as my head is not in a fit state for anything new.

I'm afraid to say I bailed on Belgarath the Sourcerer last night. I'd had enough. Didn't feel like it was going anywhere and its like, centuries, millenia pass in the blink of an eye and I found myself wondering what the hell is going on and why am I still reading this!
First DNF of '22
Not just me, then... I borrowed someone else's copy and made it all of two chapters in before I was yawning. The "Now let's hear the /real/ story from another point of view!" novel is something that almost never comes off, if you ask me.
 

Spade

Custom User Title
Joined
Dec 13, 2006
Messages
318
I finished up Shards of Earth by Adrian Tchaikovsky today. I freaking loved it. It's rare that I am blessed with good worldbuilding and good characters in the same novel. I am eagerly awaiting the sequels. Judging by the quickness of his writing, I'm sure they'll be out soon.

I was only halfway through Abaddon's Gate when I was tempted to pick this one up, so I've got to go finish that one.

Then I think I'll finish off the month with The 22 Murders of Madison May by Max Barry and Light Years From Home by Mike Chen.
 

Cat's Cradle

Time, now, to read...
Supporter
Joined
Mar 3, 2014
Messages
3,011
Rabbits follows K., someone who has become obsessed with seeking out and discovering patterns and connections throughout their day-to-day life.
Hi Danny! Hey, I've had Rabbits in my wishlist for a while, and have been thinking about picking it up. I wonder how you got on with the book? Thanks! CC
 

Stephen Palmer

author of novels
Joined
Dec 22, 2009
Messages
5,590
Location
Shropshire
The bad:
“Guns, Germs and Steel” by Jared Diamond. Ok, so not actually bad, just really disappointing since it was failed to live up to the high ratings given by people I trust.
What do you think was so poor about it? He has written some iffy stuff, but G,G&S is imo his career highlight.
 

tobl

dimension jumping portal required
Joined
Aug 13, 2007
Messages
1,341
Location
portugal
just found out there's a new movie based on an heinlein book, the door into summer... japanese... hum... the last movie i saw based on heinlein was great so maybe i see it. there's anew bob blanton out and it's fun like always
 

Danny McG

Hello Oslo
Joined
Sep 9, 2016
Messages
6,313
Location
Cumbria UK
Hi Danny! Hey, I've had Rabbits in my wishlist for a while, and have been thinking about picking it up. I wonder how you got on with the book? Thanks! CC
It was ok but a bit derivative IMO, some of the situations I'd saw very similar in other books.
Nevertheless an enjoyable read
 

Danny McG

Hello Oslo
Joined
Sep 9, 2016
Messages
6,313
Location
Cumbria UK
Today's read
Screenshot_20220114-115751.png
 

Dan Jones

Der Vater absurder Geschichten
Supporter
Joined
Nov 14, 2014
Messages
3,244
Location
I am here to do the thing!
It seemed to drag on a bit much, over detailed descriptions etc.
Plus psychic powers aren't really my thing - gimme an evil alien who wants to eat humans any day!

I'm pretty sure there was a disgusting man-eating alien in there - the floater scene?

I liked it, but the multi-timeline narrative was difficult to follow. I often find it's a certain hard thing to pull off successfully.
 

Parson

This world is not my home
Supporter
Joined
Oct 11, 2006
Messages
10,771
Location
Iowa
I took a little detour into thriller police procedural land with Melinda Leigh and Right Behind Her. This author is consistent and predictably a good read. I've read several of hers and will read several more. I'm going to give Poul Anderson's There Will Be Time a try.
 
Last edited:

KGeo777

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2017
Messages
1,093
Location
Canada
I read the Reptile by John Burke--it is a Hammer Films novelization. A very quick read. It adds nothing to the story except the description of the Reptile suggests something more serpentine in movement. I am going to read his Dr. Terror's House of Horrors novelization next.
 

Ray Zdybrow

Asocial Robot
Joined
Jan 7, 2020
Messages
272
Location
Eusterby, UK
Stross at his best is SO good, and his satirical points are spot on and have real bite.
I'm interested that you've been a librarian for 35 years. Nowadays people are expected and encouraged to change jobs and employers to make use of their "transferable skills" which imo is bs. When I go into a library I want the staff to have deep knowledge of what they're doing, rather than be worrying about their next gig.
J
Stross at his best is SO good, and his satirical points are spot on and have real bite.
I'm interested that you've been a librarian for 35 years. Nowadays people are expected and encouraged to change jobs and employers to make use of their "transferable skills" which imo is bs. When I go into a library I want the staff to have deep knowledge of what they're doing, rather than be worrying about their next gig.
Just to clarify, I'm not having a go at library staff..
 

Foxbat

None The Wiser
Supporter
Joined
Jul 24, 2003
Messages
9,267
Location
Scotland
I finished Frankenstein Unbound and thought it was okay. I do have one major gripe with it. It’s through the recollections of the main character (Bodenland) that the story unfolds. He’s been transported 200 years into the past from 2020 but the language he uses, I felt, was more akin to 1820. It’s as if the author slipped into a particular skin whilst taking on the 19th century characters and found it too tight to remove when writing from Bodenland’s perspective.

Meanwhile, my next book confirms the high level of nerdiness in my blood.
It’s called Hawkwind: every album, every song. So far I’ve found it quite interesting but after reaching the Live ‘79 album, I’m starting to lose interest. I’ve always struggled to like anything by Hawkwind beyond the early 1980s. Don’t know if I’ll finish this one.
 

Danny McG

Hello Oslo
Joined
Sep 9, 2016
Messages
6,313
Location
Cumbria UK
Meanwhile, my next book confirms the high level of nerdiness in my blood.
It’s called Hawkwind: every album, every song. So far I’ve found it quite interesting but after reaching the Live ‘79 album, I’m starting to lose interest. I’ve always struggled to like anything by Hawkwind beyond the early 1980s. Don’t know if I’ll finish this one
Have you looked at The time of the Hawklords by Michael Moorcock?

A long time since I read it - it's the first of a SF trilogy based on the band
 
Last edited:
Status
Not open for further replies.

Top