January 2022 Reading Thread.

Galactic Bus Driver

Unrepentant Book Junkie
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It's been a while since I've visited. I'm finally got back back to work this past September after 16 months of unemployment and I've managed to dodge the 'Rona bug (so far).

With the new year, I'm starting a new personal reading challenge. After managing 529 titles a couple years back, I'm going to try for 550. I won't bore you all to tears with long lists of what I've read, just updates of how I'm progressing and the high/low lights along the way.

Just started "The Guns Above," Signal Airship, book 1 by Robyn Bennis.

Recently read the Cotton Malone series by Steve Berry. Political thrillers with a historical fiction twist and a whole lot of fun. I tried to break from the seines about half way through and wound up with two DNFs and a book I could't get through fast enough. I really should have just stuck with Cotton Malone. I'll have to revisit those DNFs soon. :D
 

Hugh

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Damon Knight: “Off-Centre” (1969)

A collection of eight Damon Knight short stories first published between 1952 and 1968. I particularly liked the unsettling novella “Be My Guest” in which the main character realises that he is inhabited by ghosts.
 

The Big Peat

Darth Buddha
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So I discovered Adventures of Alyx by Joanna Russ late last year. It's slightly loopy Sci-Fantasy adventure fom the... 60s? 70s? in which this woman named Alyx wanders around being funny and a bad mofo. I'm a fan.
 

Montero

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Up the clum
Stained Glass Monsters by Andrea K Host
World with magic drawn from an alternate realm from whence also comes monsters.
Generations previously, a magic using queen tried for a massive summoning to protect her realm and it was extremely damaging. They are still dealing with the fallout, monsters dropping by and the like.
Told from the viewpoints of a village girl and a powerful mage - who become intertwined.
I've always liked Andrea K Host's worldbuilding.

As a reader of all her books, I am interested to see some elements that appear in her sf Caszandra series, being approached from a fantasy viewpoint. Psychics vs magic.
 

Parson

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Struggling with Spinning Silver by Naomi Novik. I liked it well enough until the "magic" made an entrance. As an historical novel, I might really love it, but the Fantasy part is making me want to chuck it, in spite of the fact I spent more on this book than all but two or three books I read in 2021.
 

williamjm

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I finished Katherine Addison's The Angel of the Crows. I enjoyed reading the story but I think I would have liked it more with some changes made to it. I liked the setting - a Victorian London that is somewhat familiar but with the addition of both supernatural and steampunk elements. I also thought the characterisation was good, particularly the main characters Crow and Dr Doyle. In theory, I also like the idea of a Sherlock Holmes-inspired detective duo investigating supernatural crimes in this setting but I think I would have preferred it if the inspiration had been a bit more subtle. The author says in an afterword that it started out as Sherlock Holmes fan-fiction with added angels and most of the cases are very heavily based on some of Sherlock's cases. Some of the twists are interesting, in a world where supernatural hounds are, if not common, not unknown this does add some extra complications to The Hound of the Baskervilles. However, I think the book might have been more interesting with more original cases, for most of them a passing familiarity with Holmes stories or their many adaptations will allow the reader to predict most of what happens. For a bit of variety there is also an investigation into one of history's most infamous unsolved crimes in the form of the Jack the Ripper murders, but I think some original cases might also have been interesting.
 

Vladd67

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I finished Katherine Addison's The Angel of the Crows. I enjoyed reading the story but I think I would have liked it more with some changes made to it. I liked the setting - a Victorian London that is somewhat familiar but with the addition of both supernatural and steampunk elements. I also thought the characterisation was good, particularly the main characters Crow and Dr Doyle. In theory, I also like the idea of a Sherlock Holmes-inspired detective duo investigating supernatural crimes in this setting but I think I would have preferred it if the inspiration had been a bit more subtle. The author says in an afterword that it started out as Sherlock Holmes fan-fiction with added angels and most of the cases are very heavily based on some of Sherlock's cases. Some of the twists are interesting, in a world where supernatural hounds are, if not common, not unknown this does add some extra complications to The Hound of the Baskervilles. However, I think the book might have been more interesting with more original cases, for most of them a passing familiarity with Holmes stories or their many adaptations will allow the reader to predict most of what happens. For a bit of variety there is also an investigation into one of history's most infamous unsolved crimes in the form of the Jack the Ripper murders, but I think some original cases might also have been interesting.
It would be nice to see more Victorian London crime stories that aren't sherlock Holmes or Jack the ripper based. Maybe something set in the earlier part of Victoria's reign rather than the late 1880's.
 

Vertigo

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Strangers on a Train, by Patricia Highsmith was excellent, highly recommended.

I’m now back to SF, with The Collapsium by Wil McCarthy.
I'll be interested in your thoughts on this one. It seems to have some interesting hard SF foundations but rather mixed reviews.
 

Mouse

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Jun 2, 2006
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I've got just over a chapter left of Listening to the Animals: Becoming the Supervet by Noel Fitzpatrick (which I got for my birthday last year), and I've just started Landscape of Detectorists by some geologist fans of the show (which I got for Christmas). I don't really read fiction anymore and it takes me a long time to read a book now.
 

AE35Unit

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Starting the year with some David Attenborough, QUEST UNDER CAPRICORN 1963, first edition. Right from the opening chapter you get an idea just how vast Australia is! He begins in Darwin, right in the far north, and the nearest city (Adelaide) is further than the distance from London to the centre of the Sahara desert.
 

alexvss

I don't know no grammar.
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After finishing Tokyo Vice last month, I was going to write a review. And that's when I realized I had Tokyo Underworld in my Kindle so I said, "what the hell!", and now I'm reading this one too. It's also a book about the Yakuza, but this one is much more academic, so to speak, than a first-person report on the matter. It's a little harder to read, but I'm enjoying it.
 

elggah

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Jan 2, 2022
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Flashman and the Dragon, by George MacDonald Fraser (historical fiction, not SFF)

Also ,The Emperor and the Temple (giveaway fantasy novel found on Literotica of all places). Surprisingly good.
 

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