Weaponized by Neal Asher.

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I have pre-ordered. Due for release in May 2022, Weaponized is Neal Asher next Polity book.

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With the advent of new AI technology, Polity citizens now possess incredible lifespans. Yet they struggle to find meaning in their longevity, seeking danger and novelty in their increasingly mundane lives.

On a mission to find a brighter future for humanity, ex-soldier Ursula fosters a colony on the hostile planet Threpsis. Here, survival isn’t a given, and colonists thrive without their AI guidance. But when deadly alien raptors appear, Ursula and her companions find themselves forced to adapt in unprecedented ways. And they will be pushed to the very brink of what it means to be human.

As a desperate battle rages across the planet, Ursula must dig deep into her past if she is to save humanity’s future.
 
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Just downloaded my copy and will probably start this once i've finished my re-read of the Gaunt's Ghosts series.

I might read Jack Four first, though.
 
Just downloaded my copy and will probably start this once i've finished my re-read of the Gaunt's Ghosts series.

I might read Jack Four first, though.
Jack Four is very good and this is, as I understand it, a sequel to that. I'll be waiting on the paperback pricing! :ROFLMAO:

Quite unlike usual Asher in that it is from a single POV (Jack Four), but all other usual elements of Asher are present and correct. Crazy and deadly aliens, super high tech and mega action!
 
A strange planetary name choice.
Threpsis, sounds like something you should see the doctor about.
( It is actually Greek for nutrition which may or may not be relevant to the plot. )
 
I'm maybe halfway through reading Weaponized now and it is indeed following the standard Asher violent sci-fi format.
I'm not enamoured of the way he's telling the story, it's jumping from Past to Near Past to Present throughout the chapters, I keep scrolling back through the book to keep it clear in my mind.
 
I'm maybe halfway through reading Weaponized now and it is indeed following the standard Asher violent sci-fi format.
I'm not enamoured of the way he's telling the story, it's jumping from Past to Near Past to Present throughout the chapters, I keep scrolling back through the book to keep it clear in my mind.
Did you read Jack Four first?
 
Just finished 'Weaponized' and although I enjoyed it - I enjoyed it less as it went on. The ending kinda sucked - I expected more.

And the mixed timeline thing? Meh!
 
I know a lot of folk are into Asher but I've not gone far with his work, as I originally started the "Owner" book Departure, which I thought was poorly written and I didn't get past page 10. I then tried Prador Moon, which was rather better, but some years later, I find I remember nothing about it at all, and have had no inclination to read more, which perhaps says a lot. Are these books really any good, or are they popcorn? Is it a case of building an engaging Universe over a number of books that I'm missing?
 
I know a lot of folk are into Asher but I've not gone far with his work, as I originally started the "Owner" book Departure, which I thought was poorly written and I didn't get past page 10. I then tried Prador Moon, which was rather better, but some years later, I find I remember nothing about it at all, and have had no inclination to read more, which perhaps says a lot. Are these books really any good, or are they popcorn? Is it a case of building an engaging Universe over a number of books that I'm missing?
I think your last post is possibly the case. Many people start with Gridlinked which is probably a better introduction though not the first chronologically. I think the first ones I read were probably more popcorn (including Gridlinked) but as the universe develops and gains more depth so does his writing.

Personally I rate him alongside the other Brits, Reynolds and Banks, though I do feel Banks outstrips them both by quite some way. I guess it partly depends on the reader as well. I get the impression, though don't actually know, that most/many of Asher's fans might be Brits. Maybe his style suits the Brit's psyche more? I can't put my finger on it but there's something about his writing that feels very British compared to most of the American SF writers.
 
I enjoy Asher's work and with the exception of Weaponized, I've read and thoroughly enjoyed all of his Polity books. I think Neal gets some criticism for his lack of characterisation, which I think is deserved, but Neal's strengths are in his actual space battles, for which he is my go to guy. :) I rate him highly and any of his Polity books is pretty much in the "instabuy" category. .

I'm not sure whether there is really a good place to start, Vertigo is right, of course. Gridlinked is the first book but i think you can start anywhere. The Technician is a pretty good book for a newbie, I think.
 
I enjoy Asher's work and with the exception of Weaponized, I've read and thoroughly enjoyed all of his Polity books. I think Neal gets some criticism for his lack of characterisation, which I think is deserved, but Neal's strengths are in his actual space battles, for which he is my go to guy. :) I rate him highly and any of his Polity books is pretty much in the "instabuy" category. .

I'm not sure whether there is really a good place to start, Vertigo is right, of course. Gridlinked is the first book but i think you can start anywhere. The Technician is a pretty good book for a newbie, I think.
I'd agree except within the series there are a number of mini sequences that need to be in order. If you read the Cormac books out of order Dragon is going to get very confusing, for example. And the Penny Royal and Jain books really need to be read in order. You're right though The Technician wouldn't be a bad start point and, indeed, would lead into the excellent (and nicely cryptic) Penny Royal books.

On reflection in another thread I recall someone saying The Technician was a very confusing starting point as it follows on from Line of Polity. There is this post I made with a now slightly out of date timeline of the books:

Also my reference to the Brit authors earlier should have including Peter Hamilton.
 
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On reflection in another thread I recall someone saying The Technician was a very confusing starting point
That was me! Best Neal Asher book to start with?

I subsequently did read Prador Moon, and in my view that's a far better book to start with, not least as it's linear action, and any backstory is intelligible -- a note I made for myself when I read it ended with Lots of gore, murder and bloodshed, lots of impenetrable tech and science talk, but gripping once it got going.
 

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