November 2021 Reading Thread

Danny McG

Âryatârâbhattârikânâmâshtottarásatakastotra
Joined
Sep 9, 2016
Messages
5,949
Location
Cumbria UK
My next book, Danny. Let me know how you get on.
I started reading it originally back in May, however it was a somewhat dodgy pirate download and there was too many fuzzy blocks of text, so it was DNF. (A valuable lesson!)

Now I've got a proper paid for Amazon version so I'm going afresh and with a pure heart
 

Randy M.

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2012
Messages
2,061
Finished Murder and Magic by Randall Garrett -- good fun collection of Holmesian fantasy (or s.f., sort of). Lord Darcy isn't really given room to be as charismatic, and Master Sean leans toward stereotype, but of the four stories, only one was really weak. The longer stories were quite engaging.

Next, just started another Holmesian fantasy, The Angel of the Crows by Katherine Addison (a.k.a. Sarah Monette). ONly ~25 pages in, but I'm already impressed with how she captures the tone and feel of Victorian prose.
 

Ian Fortytwo

One day at a time.
Supporter
Joined
Dec 30, 2018
Messages
997
Location
Somewhere on this mortal coil.
I'm currently reading Dune, by Frank Herbert.
I want to read it before people start talking about the film. Somehow I don't think the film will live up to the book. Hardly any film does.
It's funny how a book changes or is it us. I read this book 10 years ago and loved it, however now I just can't get into it. I read 150 pages and now it is a dnf. Really weird that.
 

Danny McG

Âryatârâbhattârikânâmâshtottarásatakastotra
Joined
Sep 9, 2016
Messages
5,949
Location
Cumbria UK
Fear no Evil - the latest Alex Cross thriller by the writing conglomerate that goes by the name of James Patterson
 

Danny McG

Âryatârâbhattârikânâmâshtottarásatakastotra
Joined
Sep 9, 2016
Messages
5,949
Location
Cumbria UK
Fear no Evil - the latest Alex Cross thriller by the writing conglomerate that goes by the name of James Patterson
I got irked at this deux ex machina!
Why would some minor golf club have additional cameras?

Mahoney lowered his phone. “We’ve got a break. Whoever hacked the security system at the Congressional Country Club didn’t know about a battery-operated night-vision still-photo camera independent of the system and mounted overlooking the terrace. It caught one of the killers. They’re sending over the picture now.”
 

HareBrain

Smeerp of Wonder
Staff member
Supporter
Joined
Oct 13, 2008
Messages
12,136
Location
West Sussex, UK
Now reading Treacle Walker, a strange little book publish by Garner this year.
Took me a few days to get round to finishing this. I'm not sure what I think of it. It'll probably need another reading (which will be easy enough to do -- it's novella length). It's evocative and peculiar and probably only Garner could have written it (or maybe only he could have got it published).
 

soulsinging

the dude abides
Joined
Oct 23, 2008
Messages
2,443
Finished "The Galaxy and the Ground Within" by Becky Chambers. (Who, as I've said before, is one of those Marmite authors- most people seem to either love or loathe her work.) It's a quiet, character-led story. Five people, three of them interstellar travellers, are stuck waiting in a small habitat dome during a disaster. What fills me with delight is the fact that this is a novel where none of the main characters are human. They're also not what you might call stereotypical members of their various species, which makes their interactions less predictable than they could have been.
This sounds really interesting. It looks like it's #4 in a series. Do you need to have read the first 3?

Nearing the end of Elizabeth Moon's Sheepfarmer's Daughter, which has been great so far. I don't much care for military fiction or books with really long into training sections, but Paks has been a fascinating character, and I like that despite regularly acknowledging the grunts generally have little idea who they're fighting for or why, it doesn't descend into jaded relativistic cynicism. Rather than defeating eternal evils, they just want to make sure the person next to them on the line gets to go home safe too (well, some of them).

Hopefully it finishes as strong as it's been so far, as I have the next 2 ready to go.
 

Vertigo

Mad Mountain Man
Supporter
Joined
Jun 29, 2010
Messages
8,139
Location
Scottish Highlands
This sounds really interesting. It looks like it's #4 in a series. Do you need to have read the first 3?

Nearing the end of Elizabeth Moon's Sheepfarmer's Daughter, which has been great so far. I don't much care for military fiction or books with really long into training sections, but Paks has been a fascinating character, and I like that despite regularly acknowledging the grunts generally have little idea who they're fighting for or why, it doesn't descend into jaded relativistic cynicism. Rather than defeating eternal evils, they just want to make sure the person next to them on the line gets to go home safe too (well, some of them).

Hopefully it finishes as strong as it's been so far, as I have the next 2 ready to go.
I read these a long time ago when I was still reading some fantasy and I thought this one in particular stood out for it's very down to earth approach to, as you say, the life of the grunts. Something about it felt very honest and I really enjoyed it. I was slightly less enamoured of the following books which felt somehow more run of the mill fantasy though I did still enjoy them; Moon is a solid wordsmith. But this was around the point when I was becoming somewhat disillusioned with fantasy in general. I now get that sort of reading from historic novels - Roman, Saxon etc. - and the realism of this first book felt, in many ways, similar to a good historic book.
 

Similar threads


Top