A discussion in favour of teaching grammar, but against declaring one form of English as being the standard.

Parson

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All this really shows is that English is a living language. When a language is spoken, it changes. There are so many examples of words whose meaning has totally flipped over the years, and in some cases flipped back. I'm old enough to remember when "bad" always meant something done poorly, and then it came to often mean something really, really, good, and now it sort of hovers as an adjective. You have to know the context and tone of voice to be certain of the meaning.
 

paranoid marvin

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The English language is ever evolving, along with the introduction of 'text-speak' and even emojis. An example is the word 'literally' in speech which now can mean what it should mean, but also the opposite. So 'I literally have a ton of paperwork to shift' is not normally now taken to be grammatically incorrect. The more common something becomes, more often it moves away from it's original meaning.

And when it comes to mealtime, lunchtime can be dinnertime, dinnertime can be teatime, and teatime can be a mid-morning/afternoon snack.
 

paranoid marvin

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Different types of English



Which is effectively Lisa Doolittle in My Fair Lady/Pygmalion. The first thing I thought when seeing this thread was Henry Higgins' 'Why Can't the English...' song.

How dull it would be though if we all spoke in the same way, with the same dialects and idioms.
 

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