I liked Chronicles of Narnia and I am an adult. Is it something wrong?

Extollager

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Welcome, Rumi_fan!

You'll find here other adults who love the Narnian Chronicles. I've kept visiting Narnia ever since around 1968. I have a library of over 4000 books, and if I had to winnow it way down, to 200 or so, the Narnian books would all be keepers -- along with the Pauline Baynes poster map I must've bought around 1974.
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tachyon

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I'm a big fan of the Narnia books.

Plenty of adults read YA and even middle grade books for their own entertainment. Comics, TV and movies targeted at kids also. Video games!

The Narnia books are better written than a lot of popular adult novels and more fun too.
 

AnyaKimlin

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I haven't paid attention to the age on any fiction since I was about seven. If it's a good story, great characters and clear setting then I'm in.
 

BAYLOR

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I know this is children's book but I liked this book so much.

Nothing wrong with , it's classic series. You might also want to try .

.The Never Ending Story by Michal Ende ,
The Phantom Toll Booth by Norman Juster
The Weirdstone of Brisingamen. By Alan Garner
The Tripods Trilogy by John Christoper
 
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BigBadBob141

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The trouble with reading, especially SF/Fantasy, is as you get older and more cynical then your sense of wonder starts to fade somewhat.
Am not saying it's gone completely, it just takes that bit more of an effort to kick in, not sure about books but the last film to really do this for me was "Valerian And The City Of A Thousand Planets" based off a sixties French comic strip "Valerian And Laureline", if you enjoy Star Wars then am pretty sure you'll enjoy this!
 

Boaz

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@Rumi_fan Welcome to the Chrons.

Even children's books can (and probably should) deal with the most significant themes of humanity. In the Narnia series, Lewis wrote to children with significant themes in mind. I find that these themes resonate with me as an adult. I think that Lewis respected children's comprehension of and desire for significance as basic human traits. Rereading the Narnia books as an adult, I am fascinated at how certain story elements that I thought were merely fanciful children's anecdotes are actually deeply insightful themes that can only be understood with life experiences.

For example, Edmund's betrayal in The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe is referenced in The Horse and his Boy. Pondering Rabbadash's treachery, Edmund muses how he once knew a traitor who repented. As a child, I knew the link and felt good because I understood how the anecdote fit. As an adult, I have lived long enough to have made mistakes and hurt people, i.e. I became the villain of the story... and I have apologized and changed my ways.

Another example is how Lucy reacts to meeting Aslan in Prince Caspian. Already having met Aslan in TLtWatW, Lucy is surprised to find Aslan even larger in size when she herself has grown taller. She remarks, that she assumed that as she grew in physical stature, that Aslan would not seem as big. Aslan assures her that as she grows she will always find him greater in size. I thought this was a neat trick as a child, but as an adult I see this refers not to physical, but spiritual growth.

Lewis wrote in a manner for the story to grow as we also grow intellectually, spiritually, psychologically, and experientially. I have found that as I age (and hopefully gain maturity) that I find even more significance in the books about Narnia.

I could give many more examples.... like Reepicheep's rebuke of Rhince, the use of the term "not a tame lion" from the first book to the last, Diggory's use of the garden gate, Eustace's failing to properly clean his sword, Trumpkin's obedience to Caspian's command to travel to Cair Paravel, Professor Kirke's logic, Jill's rescue of Puzzle, Emeth's appearance in the tent, Aravis' acceptance of Shasta, Jill's failure to daily recite the three instructions, and both the origin and the demise of Narnia. Upon future readings, I hope to find new affirmations of significance.
 

Guttersnipe

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I've read all the books, save for The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, only because I saw the cartoon and didn't want to read what I thought I already knew. I think I read them in middle school. However, I might revisit them. Only recently I've read The Life and Adventures of Santa Claus by L. Frank Baum and The Mouse and His Child by Russell Hoban. I didn't feel embarrassed in the least.
 

BAYLOR

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'When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.'

There is a part of us that will always remain a child, and should.
 

Robert Zwilling

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I like Wind In The Willows. There must be an official classification that amounts to no age limits, or suitable for everyone.
 

JunkMonkey

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There is a part of us that will always remain a child, and should.

Yep. There is indeed. But people are different. Winnie the Pooh can reduce me to tears. The Uncle Books of JP Martin make me laugh, E E Nesbit's books are great. The Swallows and Amazons books of Arthur Ransome (awkwardly sidesteps the period racism of Missee Lee) are wonderful too - I think the Narnia books and Wind in the Willows are dreadful.

The difference, I think, is that I first read Narnia and Wind in the Willows as an adult and I just couldn't get past the heavy-handed allegory.

Stripped of any warm childhood fuzzy nostalgia I'm sure the books that I cuddle dear to my inner child would have struck the adult me as unreadable too.
 

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