Inspired by

RLBeers

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Joined
Jan 14, 2021
Messages
11
Some hate him, others love him. I knew him. David Eddings with his wife Lynn (she was the one with the better imagination) recreated the coming of age fantasy genre. For a while, Belgareth was right there with Gandalf, and David inspired me to try my hand at turning a children's story I'd written for my toddler son into a full-fledged novel. Once completed, the monster was Robert Jordon size in thickness, almost 250,000 words crammed between the covers. After shopping it around, I was published and in a few months, my attempt at copying the master resulted in my book being the number one fantasy on the Barens and Noble ebook list for 6 weeks. Love him or hate him, I owe David a lot.
 

CupofJoe

some medals you wear on your heart not your sleeve
Joined
Mar 29, 2019
Messages
556
Wow! I would liked to have met him or both of them, given the chance.
He/They brought me back to Fantasy when a girlfriend lent me her copy of Pawn of Prophesy. I think I read it in about two days. I didn't stop until I had read all 5 of the Belgariad.
Waiting for each book of the Malloreon was agony.
I really like the Sparhawk books, I thought they showed a more mature approach, while remaining light.
I enjoyed all the Edding's earlier and mid works because they were not grim-dark or "realistic". You could read them and enjoy the tales and not feel traumatised... ;)
As an avid World Builder I loved and still love the Belgariad background books; Belgarath the Sorcerer, Polgara the Sorceress, and The Rivan Codex.
They were pure candy for my reading sweet tooth.
Unfortunately The Dreamers has coloured my appreciation of his/their later work. I read all four but really didn't like them.
I'm guessing that the near 10 year gap between them and the earlier Tamuli series should have been a warning sign as I know he was not well in later life.
 

RLBeers

Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2021
Messages
11
"Unfortunately The Dreamers has coloured my appreciation of his/their later work. I read all four but really didn't like them.
I'm guessing that the near 10 year gap between them and the earlier Tamuli series should have been a warning sign as I know he was not well in later life."

Yes, David was ill then. He never recovered from Lynn's passing and that affected his desire to write immensely. The spark had gone, as he said.
 
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