Village boy to Hero Fantasy recommendation

chongjasmine

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I like fantasy like wheel of time and lord of the rings, where some obscure village boy end up saving the day.
Kindly recommend me such similar series.
 

Edoc'sil

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Although it's not the best writing I enjoyed the Eragorn series, it's a bit derviative of other fantasy but I definitely enjoyed it. (dont watch the film, please god don't watch the film.)

Also it's kind of a twist on it (like most of his work) but Mort by Terry Prachett is like the farm boy story but he ends up apprenticing for death. I really liked this book, has some interesting concepts on death and some fantastically quotable lines e.g. (top two on goodreads)
“It would seem that you have no useful skill or talent whatsoever," he said. "Have you thought of going into teaching?”
or “He'd been wrong, there was a light at the end of the tunnel, and it was a flamethrower.”
and one of my favourites “He was determined to discover the underlying logic behind the universe. Which was going to be hard, because there wasn't one.”
 
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Brian G Turner

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I like fantasy like wheel of time and lord of the rings, where some obscure village boy end up saving the day.
Kindly recommend me such similar series.

A couple that come to mind:

Raymond E Feist - Magician
Robin Hobb - Assassins Apprentice
 

Hex

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It pains me to recommend it, but Sword of Shannara is exactly that kind of story.

I liked The Spook's Apprentice (though he hadn't definitively saved the world when I last read books in that series). How about the Lloyd Alexander books starting with The Book of Three? Not completely the same but have you seen The Riddlemaster of Hed? He's not really a farm boy, but close...

Taran Matharu's series starts with a blacksmith's boy. Brandon Sanderson's The Rithmatist is about a chalk-maker's son...
 

Rodders

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I've never been much of a Fantasy reader, but Edmund Coopers Cloud Walker fits the bill. It's one of my favourites of his.

I also really think that Edeard's story in Peter F. Hamilton's Void trilogy were really enjoyable, although you would have to traipse through a lot of science fiction to get to them.
 

samlk2004

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A couple that come to mind:

Raymond E Feist - Magician
Robin Hobb - Assassins Apprentice
How is assassins apprentice Farm Boy to Hero, Fitz is Chivalry's bastard and was raised as such (If the answers are spoilers for assassins quest please don't spoil it as I've only read the first two so far)
 

samlk2004

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Long time since I read it but if memory serves me correctly, he was around five or six before he was taking to the Palace before that he was just a peasant.
Fitz was never a farmboy though, he lived with his mother but never worked, he was just a very young child, though you are right that he was six. He often states his first memory is being taken away from his mother, which means he has no recollection of life as a farm boy and all his childhood, at least that he remembers, was at Buckeep under Burrichs care
 

Brian G Turner

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How is assassins apprentice Farm Boy to Hero, Fitz is Chivalry's bastard and was raised as such (If the answers are spoilers for assassins quest please don't spoil it as I've only read the first two so far)

My memory of the start is that Fitz is just a stable boy with no status, and that he has to work for it through the book.
 

samlk2004

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My memory of the start is that Fitz is just a stable boy with no status and that he has to work for it through the book.
I hadn't thought of it that way, but you make a good point, as a good portion of the book is with Burrich. I still wouldn't call him an obscure village boy (being the son of the heir to the throne, and recognized as such by the king, though not given a claim), however, if you ignore the intricacies, it does follow similar suit. Despite this, his lineage is always acknowledged and he always has a place in the noble court, far more so than a mere stable hand would.
 

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