Famous books/series that you hate?

A lot of epic fantasy is criticised for being derivative of Tolkein. WOT is derivative of fantasy that is derivative of Tolkein.
And, Robert Jordan is one of the few authors to ever challenge Stephen King for Purplest Prose of the Year honors.

I think it's popularity arises from a younger group that has read it. A group that hasn't yet read the works Jordon stole his tropes from. The first book in the series is actually pretty well written and about as fresh and original as any sword and sorcery fantasy can be today, so I can see how approaching it in my 20s I would have been more receptive to it than I was coming to it in my 40s. Still, I don't think it will age well as these younger readers branch out, reading more widely, and start stumbling across the better written, less derivative stuff that Jordan essentially repackaged.
 
I'm scared to go back to The Name of the Wind. It's huge, and I remember liking parts of it, but I also remember that once Kvothe got to college he just became completely unbearable for me to follow--he was a completely self-centered tool. I finished it despite that, and pretty readily jumped into A Wise Man's Fear...except the first three hundred pages read like deleted scenes from The Name of the Wind. Nothing seemed to progress, everything went around in circles and Kvothe continued to be as irritating as ever. I knew from reviews that eventually he left the college but it seemed like it was never going to happen and it came to the point where I just didn't care what happened to him any more. It's also possible that I stopped reading because I dreaded coming upon another part of the book that I had had spoiled for me
the infamous part where Kvothe impresses a fairy with how good he is at sex or something like that
. It was pretty clear from the writing that Rothfuss had an incredibly high opinion of Kvothe that I just didn't share.

I've also bounced off the Wheel of Time--and like others in this thread I've only tried to read it because Brandon Sanderson treats the series like a religious text. In some ways, I think my experience with The Eye of the World is similar to my experience with The Name of the Wind--I loved every part of The Eye of the World that wasn't told from the perspective of Rand. Every other character was interesting and had interesting ways of seeing the world, and then Rand was also there. For me, he was dull and predictable and only integral to the plot because the author had made him so. He likely gets more interesting in later books (or at least he might do interesting things since the magic system exists to make him go insane) and someday I may sit down to read WoT #2. (I also never finished the Inheritance Cycle despite coming to it early in my fantasy-reading career; I guess you could say that I have a pattern for things that I find boring in fantasy books).
 
The most highly regarded books I cannot stand to read are by Virginia Woolf. I thought To the Lighthouse was dreadful rubbish.

In SF and fantasy - I tried a few Liaden books by Sharon Lee and her husband, and thought they were very poorly written, and won’t be going back there.
 
WOT is probably no worse than lots of other extruded fantasy product. It just has the misfortune to have been a bestseller (and very very long) and is therefore held up to levels of analysis and criticism that most of its mediocre stablemates escape.
 
I'm another Thomas Covenant non-fan. Life's disheartening enough at times without compounding it with possibly the most depressing series ever. If I'd discovered that it had been co-authored by Marvin and Eeyore, I wouldn't have been even slightly surprised.
 
i don't hate any book or writer... that being said i might really dislike some books:
the satan versicules - salman rushdie --- really really bad. if it wasn't serious i could think of the fatwa as a publicity gimmick
out of the dark - david weber --- don't... just don't
multiverse series - david weber - same
the unberable lightness of the being - milan kundera - unberable. stick to the movie
most urban fantasy except for laurell hamilton anita series and john conroe demon accords - just not for me
brad thor - poor substitution for vince flynn
james patterson - just like the bennett series
most syfy and thriller are alright and even good sometimes.either it gets my interest or goes away and i generally forget it.
 
@tobl I must disagree on Laurell Hamilton’s Anita Blake series, it started off ok but the balance between fighting the undead and sex scenes just flipped so badly as the books progressed. I think I finally gave up around book 14 when the books stopped being urban fantasy and just became erotica, worse than that, boring erotica.
 
@tobl I must disagree on Laurell Hamilton’s Anita Blake series, it started off ok but the balance between fighting the undead and sex scenes just flipped so badly as the books progressed. I think I finally gave up around book 14 when the books stopped being urban fantasy and just became erotica, worse than that, boring erotica.
yeah i get your point honestly. however might i suggest you go back to them?after 15 with the harlequin thestory has more bullets and crimes
 
Django Wexler - Shadow Campaigns - Started great but got worse by the book, dues ex around every corner amongst other issues.
Peter Brett - Demon Cycle - Started great but got worse by the book, too many rapey flashbacks and idiot characters.
Jim Butcher - Codex Alera - Started great but got worse by the book, repeated retconning of magic system and nonsensical plot that got repetitive.

Mmm, it seems the ones I hate the most are the ones that I start out really loving before the inevitable dragging out of the series into tedious and lazy writing... Especially when they end as badly as these three.
 
Django Wexler - Shadow Campaigns - Started great but got worse by the book, dues ex around every corner amongst other issues.
Peter Brett - Demon Cycle - Started great but got worse by the book, too many rapey flashbacks and idiot characters.
Jim Butcher - Codex Alera - Started great but got worse by the book, repeated retconning of magic system and nonsensical plot that got repetitive.

Mmm, it seems the ones I hate the most are the ones that I start out really loving before the inevitable dragging out of the series into tedious and lazy writing... Especially when they end as badly as these three.
agree on django, never liked it, like peter and ne ver read codex alera but i have some bones to pick with him for his last stunt in his book
 
The Da Vinci Code, Angels and Demons, etc. Just seem really boring. Thought I'd like The King of Elfland's Daughter, but I thought that was dull too. Not enough dialogue and character development.
Good shout on the Da Vinci code series. They really are poor.
These books follow a pattern. It's like watching Pixar movies: they have a tested and proven structure that they just fill in the blanks with new clothing.
It works. That's undeniable. The problem is that the formula gets obvious when you read/watch too many in a short period of time.
 

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