Archery terms

sknox

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Is there a term for the hands that wield a bow? That is, for the one that draws the string, and the one that holds the bow? I'll gladly take non-English terms (I looked at lists of archery terms in English and could find nothing).

Bonus points for antiquated terms!
 

The Judge

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I had a look through the Phrontistery and couldn't find anything. Would they need to name their hands?

In my WP I used "bow hand" and "arrow hand", but that was for someone who always mixed up left and right, so it was for direction purposes rather than anything else.
 

Danny McG

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From my limited experience of archery (a half day 'taster' in the mid nineties) I remember the instructor saying 'bow hand' and 'draw hand'.
 

.matthew.

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Danny's answer makes sense, though I doubt they'd see much common usage even among archers.
 

pyan

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"Left" and/or "Right"?

I took up archery at college: as far as I remember, the instructors just asked if I was left- or right-handed, and then just said things like "Take the arrow with your right hand near the fletching..." I certainly don't remember them mentioning bow-hand or anything similar.
 

sknox

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I appreciate the responses. I was curious because I thought to use it as a metaphor, in the same spirit as the medieval doctrine of the two swords (church and state). I was looking not to use that because the associations are too close and I thought of archery. Seemed like the two hands working together to fire a weapon was a usable metaphor. I've also considered something like helm and shield.

In Altearth, it's not church and state, it's the lay lords and the mages. Two power centers. A character wants to have the two work together. Hand in glove is too trite and, as I said, two swords runs too close to the historical precedent. Anyway, that's why I asked.

Just in case anyone knows German or French or Italian or Spanish (or Dutch, Polish, etc.!), I'd still be delighted to hear if there are specific terms (though not surprised if there isn't).
 

.matthew.

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I like helm and shield, or maybe sword/spear and shield (depending on the context of how they will work together).
 

sknox

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I like helm and shield, or maybe sword/spear and shield (depending on the context of how they will work together).
I thought of that one, too, but it would imply one is offensive and the other defensive. I don't think either a king or a wizard would be happy with that metaphore. I guess I could fudge and call it the Doctrine of the Two Shields. <g>
 

.matthew.

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I don't think either a king or a wizard would be happy with that metaphore.
I don't know, being the spear of the realm has a nice ring to it. Sounds like a formidable king to me.

Works the other way too, with the wizards being all about projecting power and the king being there to safeguard the people. If it's magical though, maybe staff and shield?
 

Don Coyote

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In Altearth, it's not church and state, it's the lay lords and the mages. Two power centers. A character wants to have the two work together...
Combined Arms. The idea of coordinating different types of combat units during a battle. In modern warfare, the infantry finds the enemy, uses maneuver and small arms to fix them in place while artillery and airstrikes pounds them until infantry supported armor assaults the enemy position to finish them.

Your character wants the Lords & Mages to form an alliance of Combine Arms. Or Combined Might. Metaphors might be Might and Speed. Strength and Courage. Power and Projection. Wind and Fire.

"Without fire, the wind can only rustle the leaves and shake the hut. Without wind, the fire can only warm your backside in the safety of your home. But, stoke the fire, you can forge steel. Forge an alliance of Lords and Thaumaturgist. An alliance of steel- The Steel Alliance!"

It sounded good in my head
 
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Teresa Edgerton

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My husband who has made a study of medieval archery agrees with Danny that it would usually be bow hand (though sometimes grip hand or hold hand) and draw hand (sometimes string hand).
 

-K2-

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My husband who has made a study of medieval archery agrees with Danny that it would usually be bow hand (though sometimes grip hand or hold hand) and draw hand (sometimes string hand).
Yes, exactly this. That said, like anything mechanical, your dominant hand (draw/string) is used for fine/complex work, and your other hand is used to hold the work. Same-same for firearms, vehicles (in U.S.), tools, etc..

K2
 

sknox

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Looks like archery isn't going to work for the metaphor. I don't *need* a metaphor, but it could be handy.
 

msstice

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"Two faces of one sword, striking the enemy as one!" And then the Kings and Wizards fall out because Wizards don't use swords. Politics suck.
 

scarpelius

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Modern archery does not use names for the hands. I've practiced archery for 2 years and never heard of bow/arrow hand. Instead, bows are crafted for left or right hand, because of the arrow rest (with a few exceptions in traditional archery).
 

sknox

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Thanks. I'm sure the same is true for the Middle Ages and for other languages, but I thought I'd give it a shot. Hah! I punned myself.
 
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