Military Fantasy recommendations

Aldarion

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OK, so I always liked military fantasy... as well as sci-fi-ish military fantasy. Books I have read are Temeraire series (by Naomi Novik), and of course "normal" fantasy which deals with war but is not strictly military fantasy (Lord of the Rings and other Tolkien stuff, portions of A Song of Ice and Fire). Moving away from fantasy into sci-fi, I really enjoyed Ciaphas Cain books. What I have felt lack of is proper military fantasy, especially one dealing with pseudo-Byzantine societies (a.k.a. Videssos cycle, which is on my reading list). What would be good works to read in that area?
 
Look into Malazan Book of the Fallen, a 10 book fantasy series by Steven Erikson. At its core, it is about the Malazan army and their deployment throughout the empire.
 
Look online for military sci fi. Some popular authors include PP Corcoran, Tim C Taylor, Christopher Nuttall, Richard Fox. Publishers don't take mil sf, by and large, so it's a big self publishing area.
 
Though not 'fantasy,' sometimes history stranger than pure fiction, have you checked out @Gordon Doherty 's series? :

Look up a couple of the titles and check out the previews available (goodreads often)

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I've seen Myke Cole recommended. Not read his stuff myself (too many books, too little time) but they've piqued my interest. @Juliana possibly knows more about his stuff, maybe?
 
military fantasy... hum, that's more complicated.. here
the warded man - peter v brett
the left hand of god - paul hoffman
 
OK, so I always liked military fantasy... as well as sci-fi-ish military fantasy. Books I have read are Temeraire series (by Naomi Novik), and of course "normal" fantasy which deals with war but is not strictly military fantasy (Lord of the Rings and other Tolkien stuff, portions of A Song of Ice and Fire). Moving away from fantasy into sci-fi, I really enjoyed Ciaphas Cain books. What I have felt lack of is proper military fantasy, especially one dealing with pseudo-Byzantine societies (a.k.a. Videssos cycle, which is on my reading list). What would be good works to read in that area?
It's funny that i found your post today. I was just typing about Heinlein's Starship Troopers. A good read about a militarized earth culture, and it's war against a race of intellgent insects.
 
OK, so I always liked military fantasy... as well as sci-fi-ish military fantasy. Books I have read are Temeraire series (by Naomi Novik), and of course "normal" fantasy which deals with war but is not strictly military fantasy (Lord of the Rings and other Tolkien stuff, portions of A Song of Ice and Fire). Moving away from fantasy into sci-fi, I really enjoyed Ciaphas Cain books. What I have felt lack of is proper military fantasy, especially one dealing with pseudo-Byzantine societies (a.k.a. Videssos cycle, which is on my reading list). What would be good works to read in that area?
It's funny that i found your post today. I was just typing about Heinlein's Starship Troopers. A good read about a militarized earth culture, and it's war against a race of intellgent insects.
O.k. miltary fantasy, there's the Xanth Series by Piers Anthony
 
What I have felt lack of is proper military fantasy, especially one dealing with pseudo-Byzantine societies (a.k.a. Videssos cycle, which is on my reading list). What would be good works to read in that area?

I recently read Goblins at the Gates: An Alt-Earth Tale by Ellis L. Knox. Set in 4th century Eastern Rome, a reluctant general finds his legion entangled in battles with goblins, with an unlikely ally in a group of outcast Barbarian sorcerers. Though this is obviously fantasy, I found myself far more interested in learning Roman and Byzantine history due to the setting of this book than I ever did from dry textbooks. :)
 
I am a fan of military fantasy as well, so I went through my reads to find what I liked. I enjoyed the Videssos Cycle.
You may like The Traitor Son Cycle by Miles Cameron. It is about a mercenary company hired to protect a convent, set in a medieval backdrop. The fighting descriptions are exceptional, as the author is a re-enactor. He writes under another name, Christian Cameron. The Tyrant is his series of books based on characters fighting at the time of Alexander the Great.
The Macht trilogy by Paul Kearny is a retelling of famous battles in the time of ancient Greece, with a fantasy spin.
While not about fighting as such, Sixteen Ways to Defend a Walled City by K.J. Parker is an excellent read full of details of warfare in a Byzantine-like setting.
 
Look online for military sci fi. Some popular authors include PP Corcoran, Tim C Taylor, Christopher Nuttall, Richard Fox. Publishers don't take mil sf, by and large, so it's a big self publishing area.
There's also Jack Campbell and Jay Allen. The latter is all on Kindle Unlimited if you have that (but he does tend to repeat himself even more than the rest of the genre).

Christopher Nuttall is quite good, but I found that his main Falcone series got, frankly, super hardcore Islamophobic by the end. Suuuuure, he never used the name, but the bad guys all had middle eastern names and hit every single one of the negative stereotypes I've ever heard, like every single one. The first 3-4 books I did enjoy, but that last one was just distasteful.

military fantasy... hum, that's more complicated.. here
the warded man - peter v brett
the left hand of god - paul hoffman
The Warded Man isn't really military fantasy at all. Also you have to sit through every characters inane backstories (in later books), half the cast get raped, and the ending is dragged out to 5 books for no reason, is dues ex machina... and lame :)

The Left Hand of God is actually good though I wouldn't give it a reread. Almost all the tactics used are taken from history as well, so it's very accurate. However, you'll probably hate the main character, so steer clear if you need a likeable lead.


You may like The Traitor Son Cycle by Miles Cameron.

I tried to read this but the fact he spelt a word two different ways on a single page (surcote and surcoat) so soon into the first book (along with one or two other little errors) led me to frustratingly stop, which is a shame because it was otherwise really good.
 
I've read a couple of these (the Shadow Sun ones) and they seemed to fit your criteria. Not sure about the others by him
 
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I tried to read this but the fact he spelt a word two different ways on a single page (surcote and surcoat) so soon into the first book (along with one or two other little errors) led me to frustratingly stop, which is a shame because it was otherwise really good.
Not that I'm making excuses for poor editing, but I do remember that some characters pronounced words with a French accent. That was one of the unique aspects of the book, for me as a Canadian. He referenced Catholicism, indigenous peoples, French/English wars, and the geography of the Great Lakes, close to where I live.
 
Oh, if wanting more fantasy vs. historic fiction, there is also The Grey Bastards series by Jonathan French

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There's also Jack Campbell and Jay Allen. The latter is all on Kindle Unlimited if you have that (but he does tend to repeat himself even more than the rest of the genre).

Christopher Nuttall is quite good, but I found that his main Falcone series got, frankly, super hardcore Islamophobic by the end. Suuuuure, he never used the name, but the bad guys all had middle eastern names and hit every single one of the negative stereotypes I've ever heard, like every single one. The first 3-4 books I did enjoy, but that last one was just distasteful.


The Warded Man isn't really military fantasy at all. Also you have to sit through every characters inane backstories (in later books), half the cast get raped, and the ending is dragged out to 5 books for no reason, is dues ex machina... and lame :)

The Left Hand of God is actually good though I wouldn't give it a reread. Almost all the tactics used are taken from history as well, so it's very accurate. However, you'll probably hate the main character, so steer clear if you need a likeable lead.




I tried to read this but the fact he spelt a word two different ways on a single page (surcote and surcoat) so soon into the first book (along with one or two other little errors) led me to frustratingly stop, which is a shame because it was otherwise really good.

neither jack campbell neither nutall are military fantasy. military syfy yes but not fantasy.
on the other hand the warded man is militaryfantasy. eck, is a lote more mlitary fantasy that the lord of the rings.
you can always read game of thrones... i mean talk about fantasy
 
neither jack campbell neither nutall are military fantasy. military syfy yes but not fantasy.
on the other hand the warded man is militaryfantasy.

Ha, fair point, I saw lots of military sci-fi and jumped on the bandwagon there :)

But in what world is the warded man military fantasy? Yes they have a few big battles (but no more than many other fantasy books). The main character (at least as far as the first book goes) isn't in any military organisation and most of his fights are hero vs monsters. To double check I wasn't simply wrong on the definition, the word military doesn't appear in the first 100 most used user tags for the book on Goodreads either.

How about The Thousand Names by Django Wexler. I've been meaning to read them for ages and they seem to fit the bill.
 

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