Old Computer Question

Did the router not come with a set-up disk?

I recall the first time I got broadband - from AOL here in the UK over 10 years ago - and I had to connect my laptop to the router via an Ethernet cable**, run the disk and, later on in the process, set up the WiFi access. I had to set up the password password, and a name for the router, rather than using ones that AOL gave me.

On the router I'm using now -- from BT in 2013 -- I can't recall what I had to do to set it up... even though I've had to connect two laptops to it (and, more recently (okay, it was 2014), my TV): things have obviously got easier since the noughties (e.g. BT provided the Wireless SSID, plus the randomly generated Wireless Key and Admin Password).


** - The cable was about a metre or so long... and the WiFi connection would not work during set-up if the computer was closer than 1.5 meters to the router. (Luckily, I was using a laptop, so could easily move it away from the router at the relevant point in the process....)
 
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I was told by Qwest to make sure the router I bought (if I were to buy one) was ADSL 2+ compatible and gave me a username and password I would need to use it which I wrote down and taped to the CPU. Odd or not that's the way it was.

Taped to the CPU? If so, take it off and move it somewhere else first off. Next, if your ISP is supplying you with the router, call them up and ask them how to reset it (you are paying them for service), they should also have folks who can walk you through all of it. If you purchased the router yourself, type the name/brand and model number (NOT specific information otherwise like MAC codes) here and I'll see about a manual online. You're paying for the service, and you have a WiFi router, might as well make use of it. As a group, we'll get you there, yet it doesn't sound like you need to buy anything else.

K2
 
Taped to the CPU? If so, take it off and move it somewhere else first off. Next, if your ISP is supplying you with the router, call them up and ask them how to reset it (you are paying them for service), they should also have folks who can walk you through all of it. If you purchased the router yourself, type the name/brand and model number (NOT specific information otherwise like MAC codes) here and I'll see about a manual online. You're paying for the service, and you have a WiFi router, might as well make use of it. As a group, we'll get you there, yet it doesn't sound like you need to buy anything else.

K2
Going to call Century Link Friday after my dental appointment and try to do as you suggest. My router came from Qwest but I opted to buy it rather than rent it endlessly into the future.
 
Try this website to gain access to your Quest router. Depending on the model there may not even be a password. But this site should help your figure it out.

 
If you just want a plain vanilla wifi USB adapter. I've got an old one here someplace (probably the same age as your computer lol) I'd send to you. It's not serving any purpose here.


But I'd like to go back to square one. Re-reading your original post leads me to mention that having and using wifi with your tablet and/or Ipad does not require you to use wifi with your PC. Indeed using an ethernet cable with the PC is generally preferable for speed and reliability. For example, my PC is connected to my router by cable at the same time my printer is connected wifi as is my tablet and my internet radio. Your router should provide both services simultaneously.
 
P.S. If you need a password for your wifi, its probably on the back of the router.
No password on the back but then it occurred to me: how about underneath. Guess what? SUCCESS!!! There it was. And it worked! I have wifi in the house and never knew it and now have access to it. Not with my PC but that's okay. I have it for my phone, iPad, tablet and laptop. Thank you all, and especially Foxbat, for moving me in the right direction. I am very grateful.(y)(y)(y)
 
It is possible that the username and password you have are for setting up the router itself.
If that's the case the you would have to know the ip address of the router and use that in a webpage as the url and log into the router.
This will allow you to change the settings in the device and view whether the device is wifi ready.
However if this is an older router it might not be able to reflect your actual service speeds and in some cases the amount of setup utility is less and you might have to search for the default usernames and passwords.

However if the wifi name shows up in your wifi devices search and it is the same as the username that is on your information slip--then that is a bit puzzling.

Usually for the router info you would have a username and password that only you should know that allows you to log into the setup on the device(router).

That said; the WiFi would have a separate username and password.

If it is the WiFi User Name and Password on that slip you have then I would suggest looking at the router and see if there is a sticker that has a user name and Password (or at least a password) that came with the device. If not you might have to search the web for the default username and password for that device.

There also should be a reset button in the event that someone set a username and password that was different from the default.

You really need to be able to see the setup in the router because you need information from that to successfully connect to the WiFi.
This is especially so if the router is older.
In the setup.
There will be some form of encryption being used for security and I would guess that it is that which is causing a problem
Each device connecting to the WiFi has to use that same encryption when passing the password and most newer device might attempt to connect [let's say with 124bit encryption rather than the 64 bit encryption being used by the older router.] That's a basic notion and it is a bit more complicated;however if the router is using xyz named encryption the devices need to send in xyz or whatever name that the router is using.

If all your devices are new and if all you want is a WiFi connection to your service you should be able to buy an inexpensive WiFi router or WiFi access point[some routers can be turned into access points read the manual]; however this all hinges on you understanding how to set the devices up properly. That said a new access point would more likely be already defaulting to something compatible with newer devices.

Either way you would just have to setup the wireless access point to connect to your internal IP address and then it will allow your WiFi ready devices to connect.

As far as turning the old computer into a WiFi device- that might require a new network card with WiFi built into it if the vista did not have that when you bought it. Finding a compatible card for that machine might be difficult however if the Win 8.1 install went properly it should just involve buying a card compatible with the slots on your computer and Win 8.1.

I do think that if you don't want to mess with support from the ISP that the Router/Access Point might be the easiest route toward getting WiFi to work for your WiFi ready devices--However it still contains a learning curve that is best if someone can stand over your shoulder and walk you through it the first time. It can be done by reading all the manuals and doing searches on the internet--however reading is not an option in this instance, it is a necessity.

[Avoiding contacting the ISP necessitates that you continue using their old router which means the access point would connect by cable to that router and its external browsing speed will be limited by the speed of service that that old router can deliver. You might want to consider seeing what you need to update our present router to make the fullest use of the services you are getting(Just a thought).]
 
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Thanks tinkerdan. When I signed up for high speed with Qwest and they sent me the router no one ever told me if I ever got a wireless device I could use my router for it. This is completely new to me. The username Qwest assigned me was always in settings (I guess) but I had no clue it was for me. Finding the password on the bottom of the router was to me the most important discovery since stellar red shift. And it completely caught me flat footed. I'm still in shock it fell into place the way it did. If it were any more complicated I'd be pulling what little hair I have left out by the fistfuls. I do appreciate all the time and effort you put into your above post.
You don't need to contact your ISP. You already have wi-fi.

Wi-fi is a function of the router; not an additional ISP service.

You already confirmed that the router has an antenna marked "wifi" and the network named with the brand-name of the router is almost certainly yours.
You were right of course. I just couldn't figure out why until hours of confusion and frustration went by.
 
Congratulations, dask. Sometimes it takes a village. (idiot)

As you say, my router came with a card with the name of the network and the password. I keep the card in my "Spare keys" drawer.

Whenever I have a guest who requests access to the wi-fi; I hand them the card, "The top line is the network, the bottom line is the password."

Presto.
 
I would add that if the Ethernet is 100mps or even gigabit, that is actually faster than WiFi.
 

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