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Latin speakers (typers)

Phyrebrat

ba-Ba-ba-brat
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Hello,

I'm wary of relying on Google translate. In a vision a character hears (in latin) Restitution. Rest. Peace.

Would that be a simple case of

Restituere. Reliqua. Pax

And is it correct? I wonder because I thought "requiescat in pace" was rest in peace so I'm wondering about the conjugation of the fragments.

Thanks

pH
 

Artoriarius

Lord High Pooh-Bah of All Books I Survey
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West Virginia
Unfortunately, Google Translate has betrayed you, as it betrays everyone. Truly, there is nothing more treacherous. What it gave you is more like "To restore. Leftovers. Peace."

Restitution is the hard one here: the Latin nouns that mean restitution all mean more like "reclaiming property" - useful in a legal case, not so much in this. However, there are some words that could fit: "Reparatio" means "restoration; renewal"; and "Refectio" means "restoration/repair; remaking; recouping; refreshment; recovery/convalescence". One of these could work. The perfect passive participles (basically, turning a verb into a noun/adjective) "Restitutus" ("Restore; revive; bring back; make good"), "Recuperatus" ("Regain, restore, restore to health; refresh, recuperate") should also work.

For rest, your intuition is closer than Google got it: the Latin noun "Requies" should look perfectly.

But it did get the last word right - "Pax" is, indeed, the Latin noun for peace. One of three ain't... well, it's actually worse than half-bad, come to think of it.

Of course, Latin being what it is, there's some confusion about the cases - Latin has an uncommon vocative case, where a word is being identified (You know when (SPOILERS) Caesar says, "Et tu, Brute?" as he dies? That "Brute" is the vocative of "Brutus".) One could argue that the nominative (naming a word, and the base form of Latin nouns) could also work, because Latin can be singularly complicated.

So! If you prefer the nominative (naming) case: "Reparatio. Requies. Pax."; "Refectio. Requies. Pax."; "Restitutus. Requies. Pax."; and "Recuperatus. Requies. Pax." should work. I'd recommend the third one, as it sounds better to me, but in terms of meaning they're all about equal.

If you prefer the vocative (identifying) case: "Reparatio. Requies. Pax."; "Refectio. Requies. Pax."; "Restitute. Requies. Pax."; and "Recuperate. Requies. Pax." would be correct. ...And yes, the vocative is mostly the same. It's just the two words here where it's different - but I figured it'd be better to be too accurate, than not enough.
 

Artoriarius

Lord High Pooh-Bah of All Books I Survey
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Loosely, "Be silent and shut up," I think - taceo and obmutesco have rather similar definitions - essentially, the difference seems to be that obmutesco is changing to become silent, rather than being in a state of silence.

So literally, it'd be... "Be silent and become silent."
 

Artoriarius

Lord High Pooh-Bah of All Books I Survey
Joined
May 18, 2018
Messages
66
Location
West Virginia
"Tace et Sta" could work for that - Sto means "stand still" or "stand firm." "Obmutesce et Derigesce" is closer - Derigesco means "freeze, become stiff (through fear); grow still" - but it's longer, and it kinda rhymes (not a problem if you want it to be something medieval/ecclesiastical or something someone came up with in modern times, but ancient Romans considered rhyming to be the crudest form of wit. Puns, on the other hand...).
 
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