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And idea and ending – but nothing else

Writersmirror

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So, in the last time, I just can think about my novel idea. I think anywhere about it – school, bus and even when I’m sleeping. But everything I have is an end at the moment. How do I turn this idea (plus the end) into a damn good novel?
 

Luiglin

by day Stuart Orford by night Dark Lord's scribe
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Start writing, even if it is the end. A novel doesn't have to be written from Chapter 1 onwards.

The first section that I put pen to proverbial paper was a section in the middle.

The key is to beginning the process of getting it out of your head and onto the page. By doing that it will kick start ideas.
 

L.L.Lotte

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@Luiglin is spot on. Just write the scene in your head. That will help you come up with the rest.

Even if you think you've come up with a good beginning, it's likely there is something you will end up putting before it by the time you've written the rest of the story. Getting the beginning right can typically be one of the last things you do, not the first.

Stories aren't always written in chronological order -- and sometimes not read in chronological order either. Some stories start at the end and work backwards.
 

tinkerdan

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reflecting a bit of what @Cathbad has said.
If you have a beginning and an end then now you need to find the voice to make the journey from one to the other.
Or as @Luiglin says--start writing.

However there would be nothing wrong with inserting a rational moment to chose the three act story or whatever numbered story you might be familiar with and make a rough outline of how you will get from here to there while holding to that structure.

However finding POV or Narrator voice is a big portion of it all. Find a character that wants to own the story.
 

Writersmirror

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@L.L.Lotte Yeah. I could. But the thing is – I don't want to write cheesy. The thriller genre often seduces to write like this because most readers want it. But I don't want to use ctrl + c ctrl + v.
 

Jo Zebedee

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@L.L.Lotte Yeah. I could. But the thing is – I don't want to write cheesy. The thriller genre often seduces to write like this because most readers want it. But I don't want to use ctrl + c ctrl + v.
Not sure why you felt Lotte’s advice = cheesy? Writing out of chronological order is not uncommon
 

Brian G Turner

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How do I turn this idea (plus the end) into a damn good novel?
You start writing, and see where it goes. :)

EDIT:

I don't want to write cheesy.
You're on an educational journey - you're unlikely to write perfectly well for many years. The only way to perfect your writing is to write imperfectly and learn from your mistakes. :)

Btw, have you read many thrillers?
 

Writersmirror

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@Jo Zebedee Mmh... In science fiction, if the aliens always have big black eyes and a green-grey skin. In fantasy, when the elf rides a unicorn or a poor farm boy saves a princess and becomes king. Or in thrillers, if an important character gets killed before our hero can get the information.
 

Writersmirror

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@Ashleyne I do by using the 7 plot point structure now. Then, I create the characters. And btw, the first draft will be in my native language – German – because my vocabulary is more huge than in English. So, the show don't tell will be richer.
 

Venusian Broon

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Hi Writersmirror, welcome to chrons!

Here's another possible path.

Learn a bit more about writing first - do some short stories, not necessarily connected with your idea, but they could be. Force yourself to write to a word limit in these stories, say 2,500-3,000 words. Use these to work out how to do beginnings, middles and ends. (Honestly, 2.5k words max can be quite difficult - but, I find, a nice chapter length, and chapters need structure too...!) This is also about learning how to finish things, as 3000 words are not going to take ages. This is invaluable experience.

Then...

(Always keeping your idea in the back of your mind, of course. Always write down any further ideas that make it bigger.)

...Perhaps you're a 'pantser' so you need to find a beginning and just start writing. You may get many ideas on how to start. Maybe you get a flash of genius and you are very excited about one of them. Well just get stuck into that one and follow your nose with the tale. If it fails, then you've got some material you can perhaps use again, or, if you will never use it again, it's useful practice. Don't start one if you aren't excited.

Or perhaps you prefer to be a 'plotter'. So write out the story, chapter by chapter, or even scene by scene. Roughly at first. Just a line per scene at first - you can expand it later with more detail. If you don't have a beginning perhaps start at the end and work backwards? Then when it makes sense to you, just expand out these scenes and chapters (any way you want. I tend to go from chapter 1 and sequentially henceforth, but there's nothing stopping you jumping about if you have a plan!)

Hope that helps :)
 

Jo Zebedee

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@Jo Zebedee Mmh... In science fiction, if the aliens always have big black eyes and a green-grey skin. In fantasy, when the elf rides a unicorn or a poor farm boy saves a princess and becomes king. Or in thrillers, if an important character gets killed before our hero can get the information.
But that’s got nothing to do with the structure you choose. The structure is the ribs that holds a story together - it doesn’t dictate what you put IN the story.
 

Venusian Broon

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@Venusian Broon I'm a rare hybrid between both kinds. :sneaky: I need a plan. But I don't need a system for real. – Just a basic.
Just throwing out ideas for you. Take the ones that stick to the wall.

You don't need to be one or the other - I know what you mean. I'm definitely a plotter but pants a reasonable amount too. I don't think being in-between is that rare :) (and self-proclaimed pantsers will tend to have a rough idea where they're going...)

But if you need a plan, then in my eyes you're really kinda a plotter ;)
 

Vaz

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Write backwards, from the end to the begining.

You already have an ending, so come up with scenes that lead to that natural climax and Write them.

Discovering a story is a bit like doing a jigsaw without the pieces. You create them as you go along. Some won't fit and you'll probably do more than one draft, but when they all come together to fit that picture in your mind it's an awesome feeling.

A few thoughts.

V
 

Writersmirror

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@Vaz I'm already planning backwards. It's just... the pinch point I – the inciting incident – is... well... low.
 
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