May 2019: Reading Thread

tachyon

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I wanted to reply to this post in the past month's thread but missed the deadline, so I'm doing it here.

Vertigo reviewed "Crashing Heaven" by Al Robertson, giving it 4/5 and "an author to watch". I read "Crashing Heaven" and its sequel "Waking Hell" a while ago and greatly enjoyed both, seconding Vertigo's recommendation.


On topic for this month, I'm currently reading "The Deception Well" by Linda Nagata. I loved the first book in the series "The Bohr Maker" but the sequel is a big jump from where that one ended - thousands of years and light years away.

Also reading "The Food of the Gods" by Cassandra Khaw, folkloric fantasy horror.

I'll post my thoughts when I've finished them.
 

Extollager

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Finished Selby's Pursuing an Earthy Spirituality (good), still reading C. P. Snow's Homecomings, and just began Ossendowski's Beasts, Men and Gods (1922), which I am not assuming is strictly factual, but expecting some pretty fair Rider Haggard-ish entertainment. I read his Man and Mystery in Asia (1923) 17 years ago.

52150


 

The Big Peat

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Scored a review copy of A Brightness Long Ago by GGK so that's what's getting read.
 

thaddeus6th

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Brian (replying to April comment), I read that a little while ago. Found it to be a very good book. If you like it and need/want some recommendations for similar things just let me know (I've got a half-dozen that together make an almost continuous history from the Conquest to the end of Henry IV's reign in the early 15th century).
 

Brian G Turner

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Brian (replying to April comment), I read that a little while ago. Found it to be a very good book. If you like it and need/want some recommendations for similar things just let me know (I've got a half-dozen that together make an almost continuous history from the Conquest to the end of Henry IV's reign in the early 15th century).
That might be an idea for a new thread - I simply buy from Kindle deals, which can be something of a miss-mash. :)
 

Pedro Del Mar

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Road Brothers by Mark Lawrence

A set of short stories set in The Broken Empire. Very good so far and Grimdark just like it ought to be.
 

Vince W

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The 'book of the film' from back in 1984, (by Alan Dean Foster) The Last Starfighter
Foster was the king of 'novel of the film' adaptations for a while there. I've read a few but never for The Last Starfigher.
 

Bick

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Foster was the king of 'novel of the film' adaptations for a while there.
Still is. Novelizations in the last 10 years include Terminator: Salvation (2009), Transformers 2 (2009), Star Trek (2009), Star Trek: Into Darkness (2013), Star Wars: The Force Awakens (2015), Alien: Covenant (2017)
 

dannymcg

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Finished The Last Starfighter and moving right along with The Anderson Tapes by Lawrence Sanders (first published in 1969)
 

Vince W

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Still is. Novelizations in the last 10 years include Terminator: Salvation (2009), Transformers 2 (2009), Star Trek (2009), Star Trek: Into Darkness (2013), Star Wars: The Force Awakens (2015), Alien: Covenant (2017)
Glad to hear it, Bick. However, It's quite probable that his novelizations could only improve all of those films.
 

Extollager

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Ossendowski's Beasts, Men and Gods is Rider Haggardish all right. It's unlike Haggard in that there is no love triangle. It's fast-moving and violent. I'm inclined to read it basically as fiction with some factual material worked in -- as Haggard was apt to do with his African stories. A good read so far if you like marshes, steep paths, yurts, mysterious lamas, picking off Bolshevik marauders with your Mauser, that sort of thing.
 

dannymcg

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Vertigo reviewed "Crashing Heaven" by Al Robertson, giving it 4/5 and "an author to watch". I read "Crashing Heaven" and its sequel "Waking Hell" a while ago and greatly enjoyed both, seconding Vertigo's recommendation
(y)
The first of these!
I started it yesterday, it has me enthralled, if the standard keeps up then I'll deffo buy book two
 

Vertigo

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The first of these!
I started it yesterday, it has me enthralled, if the standard keeps up then I'll deffo buy book two
If anything it gets better as you gradually come to understand the whole situation better. A good example of 'show don't tell' and allowing the picture to build up slowly rather than trying to explain it all in one go.
 
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