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January 2019 Reading Thread

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Brian G Turner

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So I've got a number of archaeology books to read through, and the first I've picked up is Britain Begins by Barry Cunliffe, which covers the Paleolithic through to at least the Iron Age. I thought it would be just a general history, but he's also making an argument that the Celtic language group spread from Portugal and Northern France and along an Atlantic trading corridor which embraced Ireland, Wales, Cornwall, and Western Scotland - before the arrival of Indo-Europeans. Curiously, while there's mention of clear social hierarchies in the archaeology, there's been no suggestion yet as to when slavery became a normative practice. Enjoyable reading, especially while listening to John Lunn's The Last Kingdom soundtrack. :)

In terms of novels, I've just finished David Gemmell's Stormrider (review going up soon), and am not sure what to pick up next - possibly the next two books in Yoon Ha Lee's science fiction trilogy, or perhaps an Arthur C Clarke - I'll just have to see what mood I'm in. :)

In the meantime, let us know what you're reading in the New Year. :)
 

HareBrain

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I have several on the go at the moment:

Vietnam by Max Hastings -- not far from the end of this, but I might not finish as it's too relentlessly depressing.

Rook Song by Naomi Foyle.

Up To the Throne by Toby Frost.

Melusine the Serpent Goddess in A.S Byatt's Possession and in Mythology by Gillian Alban -- a rather dry and obscure academic text I'm reading as research for the third Fire Stealers book.
 

thaddeus6th

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I'm still reading (about 85% done) Chris Wickham's The Inheritance of Rome. It's really rather good, though not an entry level book for those just getting into history.

I'm also reading Repulse, which is a sort of history of a war from the 2060s (Caliphate attacks Europe). I'm a little less into it, given I read history, including military history, but I think that's because I tend not to read stuff modern enough for gunpowder so maybe that's the rub.
 

dannymcg

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Golden oldie atm.
I started reading this after catching most of the film at Christmas time... Raise the Titanic by Clive Cussler.
The book seems very dated,since they've actually found the ill-fated liner years after publication, but it's still a cracking adventure yarn :giggle:
 

Paul_C

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Nearly at the end of The Stone Sky and it's a trilogy that I've generally enjoyed. There have been one or two moments that have felt a little out of place, but nothing that's spoiled the story too much though.
 

Vertigo

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View attachment 49117

So I've got a number of archaeology books to read through, and the first I've picked up is Britain Begins by Barry Cunliffe, which covers the Paleolithic through to at least the Iron Age. I thought it would be just a general history, but he's also making an argument that the Celtic language group spread from Portugal and Northern France and along an Atlantic trading corridor which embraced Ireland, Wales, Cornwall, and Western Scotland - before the arrival of Indo-Europeans. Curiously, while there's mention of clear social hierarchies in the archaeology, there's been no suggestion yet as to when slavery became a normative practice. Enjoyable reading, especially while listening to John Lunn's The Last Kingdom soundtrack. :)

In terms of novels, I've just finished David Gemmell's Stormrider (review going up soon), and am not sure what to pick up next - possibly the next two books in Yoon Ha Lee's science fiction trilogy, or perhaps an Arthur C Clarke - I'll just have to see what mood I'm in. :)

In the meantime, let us know what you're reading in the New Year. :)
That looks very like the Castlerigg stone circle there Brian?
 

saulfan

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Just starting on Max Hastings' 'The Secret War' Spies,Codes and Guerillas 1939 - 1945.

Settig myself a target of end of January to have this finished.

Best Wishes,
David
 

dask

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Started this this morning at a gratefully open Starbucks:
IMG_0066.JPG

In case you can't see it the authors are L. Sprague de Camp and his wife Catherine Crook de Camp.
 

soulsinging

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I wrapped up We Are Legion from the Bobiverse series. Pretty entertaining, but I'm not really in a rush to read the rest. It kind of reminds me of World War Z... both seem like a Risk-style war game exercise at times.

I've been waffling on what I want to read next, but keep stumbling across mentions of Tad Williams' MS&T trilogy and think I might dive into the Dragonbone Chair to start the new year.
 

Parson

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Reading The Quantum Magician by by Derek Künsken. It is very original and I'm liking it more by the day. It is surprisingly accessable for a book with such esoteric ideas and science.
 

Garfunkel

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Started Laura Purcell's The Corset today. Not far into it, but I'm a big fan of gothic stories and the Victorian period, so I'm looking forward to properly getting into it.
 

Teresa Edgerton

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A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived: The Human Story Retold Through Our Genes, by Adam Rutherford.

Only about 15% into it, but finding it fascinating indeed—even though this edition was published in 2017 and the author keeps saying things to the effect that at the rate new discoveries are being made in genetics the picture may have changed substantially in weeks or months. Telling me a lot of things I didn't know—or had forgot, which is also a likelihood at my age—so I'm hoping they're not outdated already!
 

Graymalkin

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Well I was reading Find Your Way Without Map Or Compass by Harold Gatty but I put it down somewhere and now ...
Very interesting observations on natural navigation techniques employed by various cultures. Old. Well written. Don't know where it is.
 

dwndrgn

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Currently reading The Paladin Caper by Patrick Weekes which is the third in this team fantasy adventure comedy.

Also finishing up Red Seas under Red Skies on audio. Scott Lynch seems to enjoy taking his lovable characters and f-ing everything up for them for the reader's enjoyment. I mean I knew this already, this being my second time around for this series but it seems more present in audio.

Also still dipping in to Unmentionable which is a nonfiction but very humorous look at what women wore underneath those fabulous dresses way back when and how they handled all sorts of issues that aren't nearly as hard to deal with today - thank goodness.
 

anno

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Cunliffes a blast from the past great author and was the go to guy for all things Anglo Saxon.
Also recommend Francis Pryor.
Me? Finished Jesse Finks Bon Scott book and currently cruising with Rodger Daltrey but back to work this morning so limited reading hours - bring on retirement!
 

Vertigo

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I've just started Consider Phlebas, by Iain M. Banks. It is totally different from all that I've read before.
I just recently re-read this one at the start of my complete re-read of all Banks' works. Assuming this is your first Banks, you should be aware that this was, I think, his first SF book and is far from being his best. The next one he wrote in the Culture books, The Player of Games, is generally considered better. Assuming you do like him and it is your first of his then you have a lot of excellent books to come! :D
 
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