Sleeping outdoors like a Highlander

BigBadBob141

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In the 30s and 40s TB victims, including children, were made to sleep outside in bed to help with their lungs.
Some remember waking up in the morning, to find a thin layer of snow on their blanket!
 

Anthoney

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I caught this a week or so ago. It was interesting. It left me wanting to see this type of thing go on for a few days or a week.m That would be telling.
 

Venusian Broon

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Ho-hum, it's lashing down with autumn rain at the moment here in Edinburgh and just been out to get bits and pieces and got soaked just walking between car and various places.

I'm sure in earlier times, unless you really had to, you would have found a dry a spot as possible and just stay put. :)

Also, though, in earlier Scottish times, I would have only been allowed to walk out to the kirk I'm sure and not been allowed to have done anything as sinful as buy a pint of milk.
 

Venusian Broon

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Ho-hum, it's lashing down with autumn rain at the moment here in Edinburgh and just been out to get bits and pieces and got soaked just walking between car and various places.

I'm sure in earlier times, unless you really had to, you would have found a dry a spot as possible and just stay put. :)

Also, though, in earlier Scottish times, I would have only been allowed to walk out to the kirk I'm sure and not been allowed to have done anything as sinful as buy a pint of milk.
*it being Sunday that I'm writing this, in case people are looking at this during the week and scratching their heads!*
 

Foxbat

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I've camped in the highlands and I say to any with the intention to do so - bugger that. Even a tent can't protect you from a predator that is able to take down the sturdiest of lifeforms - the midge.
 

Elckerlyc

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You don't have to visit the Highlands to get eaten by midges, if you feel so inclined.
 

CupofJoe

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I've camped in the highlands and I say to any with the intention to do so - bugger that. Even a tent can't protect you from a predator that is able to take down the sturdiest of lifeforms - the midge.
Cigars...
Smoke a cigar in the tent. This is the only time I smoke. It works a treat at getting rid of all the flying and crawling unpleasantries. And a good cigar might do several evenings.
You can build a smoky fire [but not in the tent] or burn incense [inside the tent, but carefully].
Last time I went camping it was with a woman that burnt incense in our tent. It made it far easier to find our way back to camp in the dark. We just followed the scent of Frankincense through the woods.
 
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Foxbat

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You don't have to visit the Highlands to get eaten by midges, if you feel so inclined.
Midges are like tiny flying piranhas. Highland midges are like tiny flying great white sharks.

Many years ago, when I worked in the nuclear industry, I was medically exempted from entering certain areas because I'd been eaten alive by highland midges whilst playing an open-air gig with my band. My arms and neck were so badly bitten that contaminants could have entered my body through the skin damage.
 

Elckerlyc

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I have been in the Highlands once on a holiday. It seems I have been lucky not to have encountered this vicious type of midges. Usually midges find me very attractive (it's not mutual.) They're always dancing around my head and wurming themselves in my clothing, as if they're happy to see me.
 

-K2-

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Do what my ancestors did to keep away sawgimay (biting insects), use sweetgrass, also called holy-grass (which can be found in Scotland) Hierochloe odorata : Holy-Grass | NBN Atlas

Biting midges, mosquitoes, deer flies, black flies and so on, are thick throughout Canada and the U.S.. Naturally, Indigenous Americans didn't run and hide indoors when bugs were out. This article is from the American Chemical Society: Mosquito-repelling chemicals identified in traditional sweetgrass - American Chemical Society

K2
 

Venusian Broon

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Probably worth ment

Maybe the midges flew into your cloud of smoke and started gazing up at the stars too. Just think yourself lucky they didn't get the munchies ;)

There's always the old bear/tiger trick. i.e. if you meet one of them never try to out-run them by scarpering. Only make sure that you can out-run someone else. In this case it's genetics - I'm pretty sure some people are a magnet for the midge clan because of smell or some other attractive feature and they will go for them instead of you ;)
 

Kerrybuchanan

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There's always the old bear/tiger trick. i.e. if you meet one of them never try to out-run them by scarpering. Only make sure that you can out-run someone else. In this case it's genetics - I'm pretty sure some people are a magnet for the midge clan because of smell or some other attractive feature and they will go for them instead of you ;)

In my case, I'm the midge magnet. If I stick my head outside on a summer evening, clouds of the little, carnivorous s***s home in on me and start feasting. The people either side of me are totally midge-free. :(
 

CupofJoe

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I'm sure someone once told me that they hung up sweaty socks and used underwear to act as a lure-decoy for midges and the like. I've never tried it and I'm not sure anyone/thing needs to see my unmentionables...
 

Kerrybuchanan

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I'm sure someone once told me that they hung up sweaty socks and used underwear to act as a lure-decoy for midges and the like. I've never tried it and I'm not sure anyone/thing needs to see my unmentionables...

So now I finally know why midges love me so much: I must smell of sweaty socks and used underwear. :ROFLMAO:
 

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