Are you addicted to books and reading?

Lafayette

Man of Artistic Fingers
Joined
Jun 14, 2016
Messages
330
Location
Phoenix, Arizona
#41
mostly as I was buying a number of guitar pedals, ;) When I'm not buying books I'm buying harmonicas (mostly diatonics). If wasn't for space, lack of income, and dytrophy I would be buying guitars.
 

Parson

This world is not my home
Supporter
Joined
Oct 11, 2006
Messages
7,572
Location
Iowa
#42
Lovely thread. I seriously purged my paper book when moving to our retirement home. But I am definitely hooked on books; or more correctly I am a bibliophile. Here are 10 signs that you are a Bibliophile.

1. You have both a permanent copy and a loaner copy of your favorite books.
2. You judge other people according to the books they have
3. You spend way to much time thinking about book organization
4. Used books stores fill you with glee
5. You view books as actual home decor
6. You plan to use them as centerpieces at your wedding (or you already did)
7. Your ultimate fantasy is to have a library in your house, à la Belle in Beauty and the Beast.
8. You would love to travel far and wide to look at books and the homes of the people who write them
9. You own multiple copies of the same books
10. You spend crazy amounts of money on rare books



10 Signs You're a Bibliophile

As I look at this list, if I push it, I could say I qualify for Bibliophile on 7 of the 10 categories.
 

dask

dark and stormy knight
Joined
Nov 1, 2008
Messages
3,255
Location
Pacific Northwest
#43
I've changed my TBR pile so many times now I don't know what it looks like. Think David Byrne said that. Anyway, that photo you posted at the top Brian would make fantastic wallpaper.
 

Extollager

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 21, 2010
Messages
5,618
#44
This plain old two-storey house, bought for twenty-five thousand dollars in 1989, has nine rooms, not counting entranceways (including a "mud room," in local parlance*): three bedrooms, two bathrooms, kitchen, utility room/cat box room/pantry (it's more sanitary than it sounds, put that way), dining room, and tiny music room (piano, stereo). There's a little entranceway by the front door with a packed bookshelf. All of these rooms have books in them except the bathrooms, kitchen, and utility room, and indeed the utility room often has one or more books on the dryer, waiting to be taken to "the workshop," where a lot of the books are stored, or perhaps to "the cabin," where there are some books (mostly belonging to the children or kept on account of them). There are several shelves of library-discard bound volumes of The New Yorker in a bookshelf in the garage. There are no books in the unfinished cellar where the water heater and a lot of dust are. There are always some books here and there on the floor.

Doesn't everybody live like this?

*Out here, it seems most people enter and leave their houses by a side door. The front door isn't used very often during the week. When you're out walking in the neighborhood, you'll often notice that people don't shovel the snow to make a path to their front doors; all the traffic is to the side door. It's the side door that opens on the mud room here. That's where you might take off your shoes and hang your coat. There's a small shelf above the coats in the mudroom, and I suppose it usually has a few books on it.

If you google mudroom, you won't see anything that looks like ours. Those mud rooms or mudrooms don't have mud in them and they never did.
 

nixie

pixie druid
Staff member
Supporter
Joined
May 4, 2005
Messages
4,808
Location
I may live in Yorkshire but I'm a Scot
#45
This plain old two-storey house, bought for twenty-five thousand dollars in 1989, has nine rooms, not counting entranceways (including a "mud room," in local parlance*): three bedrooms, two bathrooms, kitchen, utility room/cat box room/pantry (it's more sanitary than it sounds, put that way), dining room, and tiny music room (piano, stereo). There's a little entranceway by the front door with a packed bookshelf. All of these rooms have books in them except the bathrooms, kitchen, and utility room, and indeed the utility room often has one or more books on the dryer, waiting to be taken to "the workshop," where a lot of the books are stored, or perhaps to "the cabin," where there are some books (mostly belonging to the children or kept on account of them). There are several shelves of library-discard bound volumes of The New Yorker in a bookshelf in the garage. There are no books in the unfinished cellar where the water heater and a lot of dust are. There are always some books here and there on the floor.

Doesn't everybody live like this?

*Out here, it seems most people enter and leave their houses by a side door. The front door isn't used very often during the week. When you're out walking in the neighborhood, you'll often notice that people don't shovel the snow to make a path to their front doors; all the traffic is to the side door. It's the side door that opens on the mud room here. That's where you might take off your shoes and hang your coat. There's a small shelf above the coats in the mudroom, and I suppose it usually has a few books on it.

If you google mudroom, you won't see anything that looks like ours. Those mud rooms or mudrooms don't have mud in them and they never did.
I have books in bathroom and kitchen.
 

Rodders

|-O-| (-O-) |-O-|
Joined
Nov 6, 2008
Messages
3,838
#46
I used to have a ferocious appetite for reading... then I got an iPad and the lure of nonsense games took hold. I have gotten back into reading again on my daily commute, but it is tough.
 

Paul_C

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 20, 2016
Messages
456
Location
Northampton UK
#47
mostly as I was buying a number of guitar pedals, ;)When I'm not buying books I'm buying harmonicas (mostly diatonics). If wasn't for space, lack of income, and dytrophy I would be buying guitars.
This is my current collection of guitar pedals (well, not quite, one has since been removed and another added (yesterday) ;) ) :
 

Happy Joe

Apprentice Geezer
Joined
Feb 9, 2007
Messages
545
Location
Colorado, U.S.A.
#48
Since the shelf space filled up; I do E-books almost exclusively (now showing 10.7 Gig used on this memory card).... ~ 185, SF & Fantasy, authors; mostly with a minimum of 6 books per... No longer, just, a hard copy, book addict.
No idea how much space is occupied by e-books on the backup hard drives...
The e-reader goes along on camping trips (in case of rain/snow/sleet/graupel (tiny B-B sized snowballs that fall in the mountains) etc.). I even carry a tent light for reading... Still addicted to reading, I guess.

chair and lightDSCF0175.jpg

Enjoy!
 
Last edited:

vanye

Human, c.o. Earth
Joined
Mar 18, 2012
Messages
685
Location
Germany
#51
Addiction is such a harsh word. And it somehow implies that it‘s my fault when it‘s really the books who are attracted to me. Yes, I am a nat‘ral born book attractor. And soft-hearted enough to give them a home. So sue me ...
 

Anthoney

Bearded Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2018
Messages
445
Location
South Florida
#52
Addition-light, or addiction-like or close enough to not mind the difference. If I finish a book and don't have another in the cue ready to go it irritates me. Makes me a bit frantic. I always have a huge To Be Read pile but after that there's the What I'm Really Going to Read list. There's a lot of factors that go into making that final list. If it runs dry and I'm nearing the end of a book, not finished but close. I start to get worried. Nervous, maybe with a headache. If I actually finish without having set my next book I begin to exhibit signs of jonesing. I'm stressed, easily angered and begin to put other tasks off until I've found my next fix.
 

Happy Joe

Apprentice Geezer
Joined
Feb 9, 2007
Messages
545
Location
Colorado, U.S.A.
#54
@Happy Joe .... Methinks you need a Kindle Whitepaper. No lamp necessary.
The globe lamp also serves as the main tent light... no lanterns, candles (or twists of lint burning in a puddle of melted bear fat, smoky, dripping, torches) etc. needed...
Electricity is supplied by the, rechargeable, tent battery...

I have considered the kindle products several times, however their limited advantages do not, IMO, make up for their disadvantages; limited ability to read non kindle e-book/data formats, esp. EPUB.

For me this old Russian (I think) reader works fine yet...(another is waiting patiently in the wings for this one to wear out)...

Enjoy!
 
Last edited:

soulsinging

the dude abides
Joined
Oct 23, 2008
Messages
2,150
#55
10 signs that you are a Bibliophile.

3. You spend way to much time thinking about book organization
I spend so much time on this that my wife thinks I'm completely crazy. She tends to just roll her eyes and leave the room when I get on this topic.

That said, I actually don't own many books anymore, less than 2 dozen on my shelf. I moved so much I got tired of packing and unpacking boxes of books that I knew I probably wasn't going to read again. Sometimes I regret the purge... I'd have had a very impressive collection of literature (university studies), hard-boiled noir/mystery (law school) and SFF (the rest of my life). Now I just have a small selection of personal favorites or books that had a significant impact on me.

I'm definitely addicted in the classical sense though... as in I've blown off work and life responsibilities to read on more than one occasion and barely passed the bar exam because I was busy with the LOTR.
 

Happy Joe

Apprentice Geezer
Joined
Feb 9, 2007
Messages
545
Location
Colorado, U.S.A.
#57
When I need to convert e-books I typically use calibre;
calibre - E-book management
'though its usually not necessary since this e-reader can handle most formats including EPUB and PDF....
When I need to edit EPUB files; to correct OCR and other errors, add in missing sentences etc., I typically use Sigil;
Sigil Ebook
I used to really like LIT files but since Microsoft decided to discontinue support they have mostly died off...

Enjoy!
 
Last edited:

Similar threads

Top